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The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was the legislative branch of the United States, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, from January 3, 2005 to January 3, 2007, during the fifth and sixth years of George W. Bush's presidency. House members were elected in the 2004 elections on November 4, 2004. Senators were elected in three classes in the 2000 elections on November 7, 2000, 2002 elections on November 5, 2002, or 2004 elections on November 4, 2004. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-second Census of the United States in 2000. Both chambers had a Republican majority, the same party as President Bush.

Major events

Prominent events included the filibuster "nuclear option" scare, the failure of the federal government to promptly respond to Hurricane Katrina disaster relief, the Tom DeLay corruption investigation, the CIA leak scandal, the rising unpopularity of the Iraq War, the 2006 immigration reform protests and government involvement in the Terri Schiavo case.

In addition to the DeLay indictment, this Congress also had a number of scandals: Bob Ney, Randy "Duke" Cunningham, William J. Jefferson, Mark Foley scandal, and the Jack Abramoff scandals.

This Congress met for 242 days, the fewest since World War II and 12 days fewer than the 80th Congress. As the Congress neared its conclusion, some commentators labelled this the "Do Nothing Congress," a pejorative originally given to the 80th United States Congress by President Harry Truman.

The President vetoed only one bill, his first veto, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act of 2005.

Major legislation

Enacted



Proposed, but not enacted



More information: Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 109th Congress at U.S. Government Printing Office

Hearings



Party summary

Senate

The party summary for the Senate remained the same during the entire 109th Congress. On January 16, 2006, Democrat Jon Corzine resigned, but Democrat Bob Menendez was appointed and took Corzine's seat the next day.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Independent Vacant
End of previous Congress 51 48 1 100 0
Begin 55 44 1 100 0
Final voting share 55% 45%
Beginning of the next Congress 49 49 2 100 0


State ranked in partisan order Percentage
Republicans
Percentage
Democrats
Republican/
Democrat
Republican
seat plurality
Alabama 100% 0% 2/0 2
Alaska 100% 0% 2/0 2
Arizona 100% 0% 2/0 2
Georgia 100% 0% 2/0 2
Idaho 100% 0% 2/0 2
Kansas 100% 0% 2/0 2
Kentucky 100% 0% 2/0 2
Maine 100% 0% 2/0 2
Mississippi 100% 0% 2/0 2
Missouri 100% 0% 2/0 2
New Hampshire 100% 0% 2/0 2
North Carolina 100% 0% 2/0 2
Ohio 100% 0% 2/0 2
Oklahoma 100% 0% 2/0 2
Pennsylvania 100% 0% 2/0 2
South Carolina 100% 0% 2/0 2
Tennessee 100% 0% 2/0 2
Texas 100% 0% 2/0 2
Utah 100% 0% 2/0 2
Virginia 100% 0% 2/0 2
Wyoming 100% 0% 2/0 2
United States 55% 44% 55/44 11
Colorado 50% 50% 1/1 0
Florida 50% 50% 1/1 0
Indiana 50% 50% 1/1 0
Iowa 50% 50% 1/1 0
Louisiana 50% 50% 1/1 0
Minnesota 50% 50% 1/1 0
Montana 50% 50% 1/1 0
Nebraska 50% 50% 1/1 0
Nevada 50% 50% 1/1 0
New Mexico 50% 50% 1/1 0
Oregon 50% 50% 1/1 0
Rhode Island 50% 50% 1/1 0
South Dakota 50% 50% 1/1 0
Vermont 0% 50% 0/1
(1 independent)
-1
Arkansas 0% 100% 0/2 -2
California 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Connecticut 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Delaware 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Hawaii 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Illinois 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Maryland 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Massachusetts 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Michigan 0% 100% 0/2 -2
New Jersey 0% 100% 0/2 -2
New York 0% 100% 0/2 -2
North Dakota 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Washington 0% 100% 0/2 -2
West Virginia 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Wisconsin 0% 100% 0/2 -2


House of Representatives

Due to resignations and special elections, Republicans lost a net of three seats; Democrats gained one seat; three seats were left vacant; and one seat which was vacant at the beginning of the Congress was filled. All seats were filled though special elections. (See Changes in membership, below.)

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Independent Vacant
End of previous Congress 225 207 1 433 2
Begin 232 201 1 434 1
March 10, 2005 202 435 0
April 29, 2005 231 434 1
August 2, 2005 230 433 2
September 6, 2005 231 434 1
December 1, 2005 230 433 2
December 7, 2005 231 434 1
January 16, 2006 201 433 2
June 9, 2006 230 432 3
June 13, 2006 231 433 2
September 29, 2006 230 432 3
November 3, 2006 229 431 4
November 13, 2006 230 202 433 2
December 31, 2006 229 432 3
Final voting share 53.0% 47.0%
Non-voting members 1 4 0 5 0
Beginning of next Congress 202 233 0 435 0


State ranked in partisan order Percentage
Republicans
Percentage
Democrats
Republican/
Democrat
Republican
seat plurality
Nebraska 100% 0% 3/0 3
Idaho 100% 0% 2/0 2
New Hampshire 100% 0% 2/0 2
Alaska 100% 0% 1/0 1
Delaware 100% 0% 1/0 1
Montana 100% 0% 1/0 1
Wyoming 100% 0% 1/0 1
Kentucky 83% 17% 5/1 4
Iowa 80% 20% 4/1 3
Oklahoma 80% 20% 4/1 3
Indiana 78% 22% 7/2 5
Arizona 75% 25% 6/2 4
Kansas 75% 25% 3/1 2
Virginia 73% 27% 8/3 5
Florida 72% 28% 18/7 11
Alabama 71% 29% 5/2 3
Louisiana 71% 29% 5/2 3
Ohio 67% 33% 12/6 6
South Carolina 67% 33% 4/2 2
Nevada 67% 33% 2/1 1
New Mexico 67% 33% 2/1 1
Utah 67% 33% 2/1 1
Texas 65% 35% 20/11
(1 vacancy)
9
Pennsylvania 63% 37% 12/7 5
Michigan 60% 40% 9/6 3
Connecticut 60% 40% 3/2 1
Colorado 57% 43% 4/3 1
Missouri 56% 44% 5/4 1
Georgia 54% 46% 7/6 1
North Carolina 54% 46% 7/6 1
United States 53% 47% 231/201 30
Minnesota 50% 50% 4/4 0
Wisconsin 50% 50% 4/4 0
Mississippi 50% 50% 2/2 0
New Jersey 50% 50% 6/6
(1 vacancy)
0
Vermont 0% 0% 0/0
(1 independent)
0
Illinois 47% 53% 9/10 -1
Tennessee 44% 56% 4/5 -1
California 38% 62% 20/33 -13
West Virginia 33% 67% 1/2 -1
Washington 33% 67% 3/6 -3
New York 31% 69% 9/20 -11
Arkansas 25% 75% 1/3 -2
Maryland 25% 75% 2/6 -4
Oregon 20% 80% 1/4 -3
North Dakota 0% 100% 0/1 -1
South Dakota 0% 100% 0/1 -1
Hawaii 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Maine 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Rhode Island 0% 100% 0/2 -2
Massachusetts 0% 100% 0/10 -10
State ranked in partisan order Percentage
Republicans
Percentage
Democrats
Republican/
Democrat
Republican
seat plurality


Leadership

Senate



Majority (Republican) leadership



Minority (Democratic) leadership



House of Representatives



Majority (Republican) leadership



Minority (Democratic) leadership



Members

Senate

Senators' party membership by state


Alabama



Alaska



Arizona



Arkansas



California



Colorado



Connecticut



Delaware



Florida



Georgia



Hawaii



Idaho



Illinois



Indiana



Iowa



Kansas



Kentucky



Louisiana



Maine



Maryland



Massachusetts



Michigan



Minnesota



Mississippi



Missouri



Montana



Nebraska



Nevada



New Hampshire



New Jersey



New Mexico



New York



North Carolina



North Dakota



Ohio



Oklahoma



Oregon



Pennsylvania



Rhode Island



South Carolina



South Dakota



Tennessee



Texas



Utah



Vermont



Virginia



Washington



West Virginia



Wisconsin



Wyoming



House of Representatives



The names of members of the House of Representatives are preceded by their district numbers.

Alabama

(5-2 Republican)

Alaska

(1 Republican)

Arizona

(6-2 Republican)

Arkansas

(3-1 Democratic)

California

(33-20 Democratic)

Colorado

(4-3 Republican)

Connecticut

(3-2 Republican)

Delaware

(1 Republican)

Florida

(18-7 Republican)

Georgia

(7-6 Republican)

Hawaii

(2 Democrats)

Idaho

(2 Republicans)

Illinois

(10-9 Democratic)

Indiana

(7-2 Republican)

Iowa

(4-1 Republican)

Kansas

(3-1 Republican)

Kentucky

(5-1 Republican)

Louisiana

(5-2 Republican)

Maine

(2 Democrats)

Maryland

(6-2 Democratic)

Massachusetts

(10 Democrats)

Michigan

(9-4 Republican)

Minnesota

(4-4 Split)

Mississippi

(2-2 Split)

Missouri

(5-4 Republican)

Montana

(1 Republican)

Nebraska

(3 Republicans)

Nevada

(2-1 Republican)

New Hampshire

(2 Republicans)

New Jersey

(7-6 Democratic)

New Mexico

(2-1 Republican)

New York

(20-9 Democratic)

North Carolina

(7-6 Republican)

North Dakota

(1 Democrat)

Ohio

(12-6 Republican)

Oklahoma

(4-1 Republican)

Oregon

(4-1 Democratic)

Pennsylvania

(12-7 Republican)

Rhode Island

(2 Democrats)

South Carolina

(4-2 Republican)

South Dakota

(1 Democrat)

Tennessee

(5-4 Democratic)

Texas

(21-11 Republican)

Utah

(2-1 Republican)

Vermont

(1 Independent, caucausing with Democrats)

Virginia

(8-3 Republican)

Washington

(6-3 Democratic)

West Virginia

(2-1 Democratic)

Wisconsin

(4-4 Split)

Wyoming

(1 Republican)

Non-voting members



Changes in membership

Members who came and left during this Congress.

Senate

State

(class)
Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of successor's taking seat
New Jersey

(class 1)
Jon Corzine (D) Corzine resigned to become Governor of New Jersey on January 17, 2006. Bob Menendez (D) Appointed January 18, 2006
Connecticut

(class 1)
Joseph Lieberman (D) Change of party affiliation from Democrat to Independent Democrat Joseph Lieberman (ID) August 9, 2006


House of Representatives

All seats were filled though special elections.
District Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of Successor's Installation
None. Representative Bob Matsui (D) died January 1 2005 — before the end of the previous Congress. Doris Matsui (D) March 10, 2005
Rob Portman (R) Resigned April 29, 2005 to become the United States Trade Representative. Jean Schmidt (R) September 6, 2005
Chris Cox (R) Resigned August 2, 2005 to become chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. John Campbell (R) December 7, 2005
Duke Cunningham (R) Resigned December 1, 2005 after pleading guilty to conspiracy for bribes and tax evasion. Brian Bilbray (R) June 13, 2006
Bob Menendez (D) Resigned January 16, 2006 to become a U.S. Senator. Albio Sires (D) November 13, 2006
Tom DeLay (R) Resigned June 9, 2006 after a series of criminal indictments. Shelley Sekula-Gibbs (R) November 13, 2006
Mark Foley (R) Resigned September 29, 2006 after a teen sex scandal. Remained vacant until the next Congress.
Bob Ney (R) Resigned November 3, 2006 after pleading guilty to conspiracy. Remained vacant until the next Congress.
Jim Gibbons (R) Resigned December 31, 2006 to become Governor of Nevada. Remained vacant until the next Congress.


Employees



Senate



House of Representatives

See also: Rules of the House, Rule 2: "Other officers and officials"


See also

Elections



References

  1. cnn.com
  2. cbsnews.com
  3. The Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is affiliated with the United States Democratic Party.
  4. : A primary election was held on June 14, 2005. A runoff election was held on August 2, 2005. Jean Schmidt won and took her seat the next month. See Ohio 2nd congressional district election, 2005.
  5. : A primary election was held on October 4, 2005. A runoff election was held on December 6, 2005. John Campbell won and took his seat the next day.See California 48th Congressional District Election, 2005.
  6. : A primary election was held on April 11, 2006. A runoff election was held on June 6, 2006. Brian Bilbray won and took his seat one week later.See California 50th congressional district special election, 2006.
  7. : An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sires was sworn in on November 13. See New Jersey 13th congressional district special election, 2006.
  8. An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sekula-Gibbs took her seat on November 13.
  9. 2 Election Winners to Fill Vacancies", via wtopnews.com


External links




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