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The One Hundred Eleventh United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. It began during the last two weeks of the George W. Bush administration, with the remainder spanning the first two years of the Barack Obama administration. The Congress will last from January 3, 2009, until January 3, 2011, and it began its first session on January 6, 2009. The apportionment of seats in the House is based on the 2000 U.S. Census. In the November 4, 2008 elections, the Democratic Party increased its majorities in both chambers. A new delegate seat was created for the Northern Mariana Islandsmarker.

Major events



Major legislation

Enacted



Proposed

(in alphabetical order)


See also: Active Legislation, 111th Congress, via senate.gov


Vetoed

  • None


Major resolutions

  • TBD


Select committees



Hearings



Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

[[File:US Senate apportionment (current).png|thumb|Party distribution in the Senate, since September 24, 2009

]]


Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 48 2 49 99 1
Begin 55 2 41 98 2
January 15, 2009 56 99 1
January 20, 2009 55 98 2
January 27, 2009 56 99 1
April 30, 2009 57 40
July 7, 2009 58 100 0
August 25, 2009 57 99 1
September 25, 2009 58 100 0
Latest voting share 60% 40%


Recent party distribution in the House of Representatives (from November 6, 2009).


House of Representatives

Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 235 0 198 433 2
Begin 256 0 178 434 1
January 26, 2009 255 433 2
February 24, 2009 254 432 3
April 21, 2009 255 433 2
April 29, 2009 256 434 1
June 26, 2009 255 433 2
July 16, 2009 256 434 1
September 21, 2009 177 433 2
November 5, 2009 257 434 1
November 6, 2009 258 435 0
Latest voting share 59.3% 0.0% 40.6%
Non-voting members 5 1 0 6 0


Leadership

Senate



Majority (Democratic) leadership



Minority (Republican) leadership



House of Representatives



Majority (Democratic) leadership



Senators' party membership by state, as of September 25, 2009


Minority (Republican) leadership



Members



Senate

Alabama



Alaska



Arizona



Arkansas



California



Colorado



Connecticut



Delaware



Florida



Georgia



Hawaii



Idaho



Illinois



Indiana



Iowa



Kansas



Kentucky



Louisiana



Maine



Maryland



Massachusetts



Michigan



Minnesota



Mississippi



Missouri



Montana



Nebraska



Nevada



New Hampshire



New Jersey



New Mexico



New York



North Carolina



North Dakota



Ohio



Oklahoma



Oregon



Pennsylvania



Rhode Island



South Carolina



South Dakota



Tennessee



Texas



Utah



Vermont



Virginia



Washington



West Virginia



Wisconsin



Wyoming



House of Representatives

Members' party membership by district
Percentage of members from each party by state at the opening of the 111th Congress in January 2009, ranging from dark blue (most Democratic) to dark red (most Republican).


Alabama

(3 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

Alaska

(1 Republican)

Arizona

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

Arkansas

(3 Democrats, 1 Republican)

California

(34 Democrats, 19 Republicans)

Colorado

(5 Democrats, 2 Republicans)

Connecticut

(5 Democrats)

Delaware

(1 Republican)

Florida

(10 Democrats, 15 Republican)

Georgia

(6 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

Hawaii

(2 Democrats)

Idaho

(1 Democrat, 1 Republican)

Illinois

(12 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

Indiana

(5 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

Iowa

(3 Democrats, 2 Republicans)

Kansas

(1 Democrat, 3 Republicans)

Kentucky

(2 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

Louisiana

(1 Democrat, 6 Republicans)

Maine

(2 Democrats)

Maryland

(7 Democrats, 1 Republicans)

Massachusetts

(10 Democrats)

Michigan

(8 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

Minnesota

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

Mississippi

(3 Democrats, 1 Republican)

Missouri

(4 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

Montana

(1 Republican)

Nebraska

(3 Republicans)

Nevada

(2 Democrats, 1 Republican)

New Hampshire

(2 Democrats)

New Jersey

(8 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

New Mexico

(3 Democrats)

New York

(27 Democrats, 2 Republicans)

North Carolina

(8 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

North Dakota

(1 Democrat)

Ohio

(10 Democrats, 8 Republicans)

Oklahoma

(1 Democrat, 4 Republicans)

Oregon

(4 Democrats, 1 Republican)

Pennsylvania

(12 Democrats, 7 Republicans)

Rhode Island

(2 Democrats)

South Carolina

(2 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

South Dakota

(1 Democrat)

Tennessee

(5 Democrats, 4 Republicans)

Texas

(12 Democrats, 20 Republicans)

Utah

(1 Democrat, 2 Republicans)

Vermont

(1 Democrat)

Virginia

(6 Democrats, 5 Republicans)

Washington

(6 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

West Virginia

(2 Democrats, 1 Republican)

Wisconsin

(5 Democrats, 3 Republicans)

Wyoming

(1 Republican)

Non-voting members



Changes in membership

Senate

Four of the changes are associated with the 2008 presidential election and appointments to the Obama administration, one Senator changed parties, one election was disputed, one Senator died, one Senator resigned, and three appointed Senators will serve only until special elections are held during this congress.
Date seat became vacant or otherwise affected State

(class)
Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of successor's taking seat
January 3, 2009 Minnesota

(2)
Vacant Incumbent Norm Coleman (R) challenged the election of Al Franken (D). Following recounts and litigation, Coleman conceded. Al Franken

(D)
July 7, 2009
January 3, 2009 Illinois

(3)
Vacant Barack Obama (D) resigned near the end of the previous Congress, after being elected President of the United States. Due to a credentials challenge, his successor—appointed December 31, 2008, during the last Congress—was not sworn in to fill his seat until 12 days after the initiation of this Congress. Roland Burris

(D)
January 15, 2009
January 15, 2009 Delaware

(2)
Joe Biden

(D)
Resigned to assume the position of Vice President.

The appointed successor will fill the seat until a special election in November 2010.
Ted Kaufman

(D)
January 16, 2009
January 20, 2009 Colorado

(3)
Ken Salazar

(D)
Resigned to become Secretary of the Interior.

The appointed successor will fill the seat until a special election in November 2010.
Michael Bennet

(D)
January 22, 2009
January 21, 2009 New York

(1)
Hillary Clinton

(D)
Resigned to become Secretary of State.

The appointed successor will fill the seat until a special election in November 2010.
Kirsten Gillibrand

(D)
January 27, 2009
April 30, 2009 Pennsylvania

(3)
Arlen Specter

(R)
Changed party affiliation. Arlen Specter

(D)
April 30, 2009
August 25, 2009 Massachusetts

(1)
Ted Kennedy

(D)
Died.

The appointed successor will fill the seat until a special election in January 2010.
Paul G. Kirk

(D)
September 25, 2009
September 9, 2009 Florida

(3)
Mel Martinez

(R)
Resigned for personal reasons.

The appointed successor will serve the remainder of the Congress.
George LeMieux

(R)
September 10, 2009


TBD, after January 19, 2010 Massachusetts

(1)
Paul G. Kirk

(D)
The appointment lasts only until the January 19, 2010 special election, in which he is not a candidate.

The winner of the special election will serve the remainder of the term that expires January 3, 2013.
TBD TBD, after January 19, 2010
TBD, after November 2, 2010 Delaware

(2)
Ted Kaufman

(D)
The appointment lasts only until the November 2, 2010 special election, in which he is not a candidate.

The winner of the special election will serve the remainder of the term that expires January 3, 2015.
TBD TBD, after November 2, 2010
TBD, after November 2, 2010 Illinois

(3)
Roland Burris

(D)
The appointment lasts only until the November 2, 2010 special election, in which he is not a candidate.

The winner of the special election will serve the remainder of the term that expires January 3, 2011.
TBD TBD, after November 2, 2010


House of Representatives

The five changes to date have been associated with appointments to the Obama administration, four directly and one indirectly. One Congressman will resign to take a public policy job. House vacancies are only filled by elections. State laws regulate when (and if) there will be special elections.
Date seat became vacant District Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of successor's taking office
January 3, 2009 Vacant Rahm Emanuel (D) resigned near the end of the previous Congress after being named White House Chief of Staff.

A special election was held April 7, 2009
Michael Quigley

(D)
April 21, 2009
January 26, 2009 Kirsten Gillibrand

(D)
Resigned when appointed to the Senate, replacing Hillary Clinton who became Secretary of State.

A special election was held March 31, 2009.
Scott Murphy

(D)
April 29, 2009
February 24, 2009 Hilda Solis

(D)
Resigned to become Secretary of Labor.

A special election was held July 14, 2009.
Judy Chu

(D)
July 16, 2009
June 26, 2009 Ellen Tauscher

(D)
Resigned to become Undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.

A special election was held November 3, 2009.
John Garamendi

(D)
November 5, 2009
September 21, 2009 John M. McHugh

(R)
Resigned to become Secretary of the Army.

A special election was held November 3, 2009.
Bill Owens

(D)
November 6, 2009
TBD, sometime in January 2010 Robert Wexler

(D)
Will resign to become president of the Center for Middle East Peace & Economic Cooperation.

A special election might be held.
TBD TBD


Employees



Senate



House of Representatives



See also

Elections



Membership lists



References

  1. Consolidated Natural Resources Act of 2008,
  2. See . Section 1 sets the beginning of the first session of the 111th Congress. Section 2 sets the date for counting Electoral College votes.
  3. , resolution to provide for the appointment of a committee to receive and to report evidence with respect to the articles of impeachment against Judge Samuel B. Kent.
  4. Articles of impeachment against Judge Kent were dismissed by the Senate on July 22, 2009, and the Impeachment Trial Committee terminated.
  5. The Democratic Senate Majority Leader also serves as the Chairman of the Democratic Conference.
  6. Burris was appointed on December 31, 2008, during the 110th United States Congress. However, he was not allowed to take the oath until January 15, 2009, due to the controversy surrounding Gov. Rod Blagojevich, who appointed him.
  7. Al Franken was elected to the term beginning January 3, 2009, but did not take office until July 7, 2009 due to a recount and subsequent election challenge.
  8. Arlen Specter announced his switch from the Republican to the Democratic party on April 28, and it officially took effect on April 30.
  9. Vacancy resulted because a senator could not be seated due to a disputed election
  10. Vacancy continued from previous congress


External links




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