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Champions

Major League Baseball





Other champions



Awards and honors



MLB statistical leaders



  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Kirby Puckett MIN .339 Tony Gwynn SDP .336
HR Fred McGriff TOR 36 Kevin Mitchell SFG 47
RBI Rubén Sierra TEX 119 Kevin Mitchell SFG 125
Wins Bret Saberhagen KCR 23 Mike Scott HOU 20
ERA Bret Saberhagen KCR 2.16 Scott Garrelts SFG 2.28


Major League Baseball final standings





American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
East Division
1st Toronto Blue Jays 89   73 .549    --
2nd Baltimore Orioles 87   75 .537   2.0
3rd Boston Red Sox 83   79 .512   6.0
4th Milwaukee Brewers 81   81 .500   8.0
5th New York Yankees 74   87 .460 14.5
6th Cleveland Indians 73   89 .451 16.0
7th Detroit Tigers 59 103 .364 30.0

West Division
1st Oakland Athletics 99   63 .611    --
2nd Kansas City Royals 92   70 .568   7.0
3rd California Angels 91   71 .562   8.0
4th Texas Rangers 83   79 .512 16.0
5th Minnesota Twins 80   82 .494 19.0
6th Seattle Mariners 73   89 .451 26.0
7th Chicago White Sox 69   92 .429 29.5







National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
East Division
1st Chicago Cubs 93   69 .574    --
2nd New York Mets 87   75 .537   6.0
3rd St. Louis Cardinals 86   76 .531   7.0
4th Montreal Expos 81   81 .500 12.0
5th Pittsburgh Pirates 74   88 .457 19.0
6th Philadelphia Phillies 67   95 .414 26.0

West Division
1st San Francisco Giants 92   70 .568    --
2nd San Diego Padres 89   73 .549   3.0
3rd Houston Astros 86   76 .531   6.0
4th Los Angeles Dodgers 77   83 .481 14.0
5th Cincinnati Reds 75   87 .463 17.0
6th Atlanta Braves 63   97 .394 28.0


Events

January-April





May-August









  • June 8 - At Veterans Stadiummarker, the visiting Pittsburgh Pirates score 10 runs in the top of the first inning against the Philadelphia Phillies, three of which come on a Barry Bonds home run. As the Phillies come to bat in the bottom of the first, Pirate broadcaster Jim Rooker says on the air, "If we lose this game, I'll walk home." Both Von Hayes and Steve Jeltz hit two home runs (the latter would ony hit five during his Major League career) to trigger the comeback for the Phillies, who finally tie the game in the 8th on a wild pitch, then take the lead on Darren Daulton's two-run single and go on to win 15-11. After the season, Rooker conducts a 300-plus-mile charity walk from Philadelphiamarker to Pittsburghmarker.












  • August 24 - Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti announces in a press conference that Pete Rose is banned from baeball for life, in the wake of evidence that has come to light regarding Rose's gambling history.




September-December





  • October 3 - Kirby Puckett wins an unlikely, at the time, batting title taking advantage of an off year by Wade Boggs due to marital issues. Puckett would clinch the title in Seattlemarker on a double in the final game if the season.


  • October 9 - After 43 years on the air, NBC concludes its run as the number one over-the-air television broadcaster for Major League Baseball games.






  • November 20 - Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Robin Yount wins his second American League MVP Award. With his Award coming in a year he played shortstop, he is the first player to win two such awards while playing different positions.


  • November 22 - Free agent outfielder Kirby Puckett re-signs with the Minnesota Twins for $9 million over three years, making him the first ML player ever to sign a contract that calls for an average salary of $3 million per year.


Movies



Births

January-April

April 17 - Deolis Guerra

Deaths

January-March

  • January 9 - Bill Terry, 90, Hall of Fame first baseman for the New York Giants who batted .341 lifetime and was the last National Leaguer to hit .400 (.401 in 1930); also managed Giants to 1933 World Series title


  • January 12 - Clise Dudley, 85, pitcher who posted a 17-33 record for the Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Chicago National League teams from 1929 to 1933


  • January 13 - Pat Ankenman, 76, backup second baseman who hit .241 for the St. Louis Cardinals (1936) and Brooklyn Dodgers (1943-44)








  • January 21 - Carl Furillo, 66, All-Star right fielder for the Dodgers who batted .300 five times and won 1953 batting title


  • January 22 - Willie Wells, 83, All-Star shortstop of the Negro Leagues who combined batting power with excellent defense


  • January 23 - George Case, 73, All-Star outfielder for the Washington Senators who led the AL in stolen bases six times










  • February 17 - Lefty Gómez, 80, Hall of Fame pitcher for the New York Yankees who had four 20-win seasons and a .649 career winning percentage; led AL in strikeouts three times and in wins and ERA twice each, and was 6-0 in World Series


  • February 21 - Chet Ross, 70, backup outfielder who hit .241 with 34 home runs and 170 RBI in 413 games for the Boston Bees/Braves from 1939 to 1944


  • February 24 - Sparky Adams, 94, infielder for the Cubs, Pirates, Cardinals and Reds between the 1922 and 1934 seasons




  • March 19 - Joe Malay, 83, backup first baseman form the New York Giants in 1933 and 1935


  • March 28 - Nick Bremigan, 43, American League umpire since 1974 who officiated in four ALCS and the 1980 World Series


April-June

  • April 6 - Carlos Bernier, 62, Puerto Rican outfielder who hit .213 in 105 games for the 1953 Pittsburgh Pirates


  • April 8 - Andy Karl, 75, pitcher who posted a 18-23 record with a 3.51 ERA for the Boston Red Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Braves from 1943 to 1946


  • April 8 - Bus Saidt, 68, sportswriter who covered the Phillies, Mets and Yankees for the Trenton Times since 1967; previously a minor league broadcaster


  • April 9 - Otto Huber, 75, backup infielder who hit ,273 in 11 games for the 1939 Boston Bees


  • April 12 - Arnold Carter, 71, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds from 1944-45, one of many players who only appeared in the majors during World War II, who posted a 13-11 record with a 2.72 ERA in 46 games


  • April 14 - Carr Smith, 88, backup outfielder for the Washington Senators from 1923 to 1924


  • April 16 - Jocko Conlan, 89, Hall of Fame umpire who worked in the National League from 1941 to 1964, including five World Series and six All-Star Games


  • April 19 - Gale Staley, 89, backup second baseman who hit .429 in seven games for the 1925 Chicago Cubs


  • April 23 - Howie Krist, 73, pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals between the 1937 and 1946 season, including World Series championship teams in 1942 and 1946




  • May 7 - Howie Moss, 69, outfielder/third baseman for the New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians in the early 1940s, also the only player in International League history to lead the circuit in home runs four times, including 53 in 1947, a mark has not been reached since then


  • May 13 - Al Reiss, 80, shortstop for the 1932 Philadelphia Athletics


  • May 17 - Specs Toporcer, 90, infielder for the Cardinals for eight seasons, and the first non-pitcher to wear eyeglasses; later a minor league manager




  • June 6 - Whitey Glazner, 95, pitcher who posted a 41-48n record for the Pirates and Phillies from 1920 to 1924


  • June 8 - Bibb Falk, 90, left fielder who batted .314 with White Sox and Indians; coached Texas to two College World Series titles


  • June 8 - Glenn McQuillen, 74, reserve outfielder who hit .274 for the St. Louis Browns from 1939 to 1947, and later spent 10 years playing and managing in the minor leagues


  • June 8 - Emil Verban, 73, All-Star second baseman for four NL teams who hit .412 in the 1944 World Series


  • June 10 - Joe Stripp, 86, fine defensive third baseman who hit .294 for the Cincinnati, Brooklyn, St. Louis and Boston National League teams from 1928 through 1938




  • June 15 - Judy Johnson, 89, Hall of Fame third baseman of the Negro Leagues who became the major leagues' first black coach, and later a scout




  • June 23 - Rick Anderson, 35, relief pitcher for the Yankees and Mariners from 1979-80, who in 1979 was named International League Pitcher of the Year, after going 13-3 with a 1.63 ERA and a league-leading 21 saves


July-September

  • July 13 - Vern Olsen, 71, pitcher who posted a 30-26 record with a 3.40 ERA in five seasons for the Chicago Cubs


  • July 18 - Donnie Moore, 35, All-Star relief pitcher who never overcame the disappointment from giving up a pivotal home run in the 1986 ALCS


  • July 24 - Wally Kimmick, 92, backup infielder who hit .261 in 163 games with the Cardinals, Reds and Phillies from 1919 to 1926


  • August 1 - Don Heffner, 78, who spent 36 seasons in the majors (1934-1969) as a player, coach and manager




  • August 5 - Max Macon, 73, pitcher, first baseman and outfielder who posted a 17-18 record and hit .265 in six seasons for the St. Louis Cardinals, Brooklyn Dodgers and Boston Braves


  • August 8 - Bob Harris, 25, pitcher who won 30 games for the Tigers, Browns and Athletics from 1938 to 1942


  • August 10 - Tom Hughes, 82, backup outfielder who hit .373 in 17 games for the 1930 Detroit Tigers




  • August 21 - Ted Wilks, 73, relief pitcher who posted a 59-30 record with a 3.26 ERA and 46 saves for the Cardinals, Pirates and Indians from 1944 through 1953


  • August 25 - Jim Brideweser, 62, backup shortstop who hit .252 in 329 games for the Yankees, Orioles, White Sox and Tigers from 1951 to 1956


  • August 27 - Hal Kelleher, 76, pitcher who was 4-9 in part of four seasons for the Phillies in the mid-1930s


  • August 28 - Fred Waters, 62, relief pitcher who posted a 2-2 record with a 2.89 ERA in 25 games for the Pirates from 1955-56




  • August 31 - Skeeter Newsome, 78, shortstop for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies from 1935 to 1947; later a successful minor league manager between 1949 and 1960


  • September 1 - A. Bartlett Giamatti, 51, commissioner of baseball since April, previously NL president since 1986, known for numerous writings on the sport as well as his banishment of Pete Rose


  • September 3 - Rip Sewell, 82, All-Star pitcher who won 143 games for the Pirates, known for his "eephus" pitch


  • September 4 - Hal Lee, 84, outfielder for the Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Boston National League teams, who replaced Babe Ruth in left field in what turned out to be Ruth's last game on May 30,


  • September 17 - Leon Culberson, 71, outfielder for the Washington Senators and Boston Red Sox from 1943-48, who hit .313 in 1946, as the Red Sox won the American League pennant


  • September 21 - Murry Dickson, 73, All-Star pitcher who won 20 games for the 1951 Pirates, but led NL in losses the next three years




  • September 30 - Roy Weir, 78, pitcher who posted a 6-4 record for the Boston Bees/Braves from 1936 to 1939


October-December

  • October 11 - Bill Phebus, 80, pitcher who was 3-2 in 13 games for the Washington Senators from 1936 through 1938


  • October 12 - Joe Foy, 46, third baseman for the Boston Red Sox, Kansas City Royals, New York Mets and Washington Senators from 1966 to 1971, who also won the International League batting title, MVP award and Rookie of the Year during the 1965 season


  • October 15 - Lou Guisto, 94, backup first baseman who hit .196 in 156 games for the Indians from 1916 to 1923






  • November 2 - Steve Simpson, 41, relief pitcher who posted a 0-2 record in nine games for the 1972 San Diego Padres


  • November 7 - Tommy Tatum, 70, center fielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds in the 1940s, who served in World War II and later managed in the minor leagues


  • November 8 - Johnny Lanning, 79, pitcher who posted a 58-60 record with a 3.58 ERA in 278 games for the Boston Bees/Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1936-1947




  • November 20 - Dolan Nichols, 59, relief pitcher for the 1958 Chicago Cubs, who had one career save and surrendered only one home run in 41.0 innings


  • November 26 - Lew Fonseca, 90, infielder who batted .316 with four teams, winning 1929 batting title with Indians; later headed the major leagues' motion picture department


  • November 27 - Ray Boggs, 84, relief pitcher who appeared in four games with the 1928 Boston Braves


  • November 28 - Bill Posedel, 83, pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Boston Braves between 1938 and 1946, who posted a 41-43 mark and also was a World War II veteran




  • December 6 - Art Parks, 78, outfielder who hit .275 in 78 games for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the late 1930s




  • December 21 - Blackie Schwamb, 63, pitcher for the 1948 St. Louis Browns, who later became the first major league player to ever be convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison




  • December 25 - Billy Martin, 61, manager of the Yankees on five occasions who won the 1977 World Series title but was also known for his tempestuous behavior off the field; managed Minnesota, Detroit and Oakland to playoff appearances as well, and was an All-Star second baseman with Yankees


  • December 26 - Roy Joiner, 83, pitched three years for the Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees, another 15 seasons in the minor leagues, and also served during World War II



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