The Full Wiki

7th century: Map

  
  
  
  
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:

Eastern Hemisphere at the beginning of the 7th century.
Eastern Hemisphere at the end of the 7th century.


The 7th century is the period from 601 to 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian/Common Era.

Overview

The Muslim conquests began after the death of Muhammad in 632. Islam expanded beyond the Arabian Peninsula under the Rashidun Caliphate (632–661) and the Umayyad Caliphate (661–750). The Islamic conquest of Persia in the 7th century led to the downfall of the Sassanid Empire. Also conquered during the 6th century were Syria, Armenia, Egypt, and North Africa.

The Eastern Empire continued suffering setbacks during the rapid expansion of the Arab Empire. Although life in the countryside deteriorated, Constantinoplemarker grew to become the largest and wealthiest city in the world. It is estimated that the Plague of Justinian killed as many as 100 million people across the world. It caused Europe's population to drop by around 50% between 550 and 700. It also may have contributed to the success of the Arabs.

In the Iberian Peninsulamarker, the seventh century was the Siglo de Concilios, that is, century of councils, referring to the Councils of Toledo.

In the 7th century, Harsha united Northern India, which had reverted to small republics and states after the fall of the Gupta Empire in the 6th century. In Chinamarker, the Sui Dynasty was replaced by the Tang Dynasty. Silla allied itself with the Tang Dynasty, subjugating Baekje and defeating Goguryeo to unite the Korean Peninsula under one ruler. The Asuka Period persisted in Japanmarker throughout the 7th century.

Events



Significant persons



Inventions, discoveries, introductions



Decades and years

References

  1. The History of the Bubonic Plague
  2. The good and bad of a population drop
  3. Roberts, J: "History of the World.". Penguin, 1994.
  4. Jeffrey Richards. The Popes and the Papacy in the Early Middle Ages, 476–752



Embed code:






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message