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Alexander Gennadevitch Mogilny ( ) born on February 18, 1969, in Khabarovskmarker, Russian SFSR, Soviet Unionmarker) is a Russianmarker professional ice hockey player currently without a contract. Mogilny has not played since the end of the 2005–06 season, but has yet to announce his retirement.

Mogilny was best known for his lightning quick speed and lethal wrist shot in his early years which led to his career year of 76 goals in the 1992–93 NHL season. As his career progressed he grew to become a selfless player and was not only known for his speed and shooting but also his vision, passing and skilled stick handling ability.

His most common nickname was "Alexander the Great" (coined by Sabres broadcaster Rick Jeanneret) but he has sinced passed that down to Russian phenomenon Alexander Ovechkin. Ovechkin later said in an interview how he was honored to be receiving the nickname of one of his boyhood heroes.

His contract expired with the New Jersey Devils at the end of the 2006–07 NHL season, with Mogilny not playing in a single game all season due to injury.

Playing career

In the Soviet Union, he played on a line with center Sergei Fedorov and winger Pavel Bure, a lethal combination that is best remembered as one of the most productive lines in hockey history, as all three posted spectacular numbers with their combination of speed and puck-handling skills. He represented the Soviet Union in 1988 and 1989 at the World Junior Championships, winning the Best Forward award in 1988. Mogilny also played for the senior Soviet Team that won a gold medal at the 1988 Winter Olympics. After the medal ceremony of the 1989 World Junior Championships, he left the Soviet team and defected to North America with the help of representatives of the Buffalo Sabres, the NHL club that had drafted him, 89th overall, a year earlier in the 1988 NHL Entry Draft. Mogilny chose the number 89 in recognition of both the year he defected and his place in the draft.

Mogilny tied Teemu Selänne for the most goals scored in the 1992–93 NHL season, scoring 76 goals in 77 games. In that same season he scored his 50th goal in his 46th game; however, it does not count as an official 50 goals in 50 games because his 50th goal came in his team's 53rd game.

In the National Hockey League, he played for the Buffalo Sabres, Vancouver Canucks, and the New Jersey Devils (winning the Stanley Cup in 2000). He signed as a free agent with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2001, and quickly became one of their top players. In the process, he became the only person to dethrone Leafs captain Mats Sundin as the team's leading scorer since his Leafs debut, beating him by 7 points in 2002–03. He finished the year winning the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy for sportsmanship and gentlemanly conduct. In the 2003–04 season he injured his hip and had to have major surgery and missed most of the season.

After recovering over the lockout cancelled 2004–05 season, he re-signed with New Jersey in August 2005, agreeing to US$7 million for two years. Mogilny was placed on waivers by the New Jersey Devils, and was assigned to the Albany River Rats, the Devils minor league affiliate at the time, in order to make salary cap room for Patrik Eliáš' return. His 473 career NHL goals at the time were the most ever for a player entering the AHL.

Alexander Mogilny was the first European to lead the league in goals scored (along with Teemu Selänne from Finlandmarker), first Russian to be named to the NHL All-Star Team, first Russian to be named captain of an NHL team, and is (as of the end of the 2008–09 season) the second all-time Russian scorer in the NHL. Mogilny would have also been the first Russian player to score 1000 points in the NHL but several injuries delayed his reaching that goal until fellow Russian star Sergei Fedorov reached the mark just a few games before Mogilny.

Awards



Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1986–87 CSKA Moscow USSR 28 15 1 16 4
1987–88 CSKA Moscow USSR 39 12 8 20 14
1988–89 CSKA Moscow USSR 31 11 11 22 24
1989–90 Buffalo Sabres NHL 65 15 28 43 16 4 0 1 1 2
1990–91 Buffalo Sabres NHL 62 30 34 64 16 6 0 6 6 2
1991–92 Buffalo Sabres NHL 67 39 45 84 73 2 0 2 2 0
1992–93 Buffalo Sabres NHL 77 76 51 127 40 7 7 3 10 6
1993–94 Buffalo Sabres NHL 66 32 47 79 22 7 4 2 6 6
1994–95 Spartak Moscow IHL 1 0 1 1 0
1994–95 Buffalo Sabres NHL 44 19 28 47 36 5 3 2 5 2
1995–96 Vancouver Canucks NHL 79 55 52 107 16 6 1 8 9 8
1996–97 Vancouver Canucks NHL 76 31 42 73 18
1997–98 Vancouver Canucks NHL 51 18 27 45 36
1998–99 Vancouver Canucks NHL 59 14 31 45 58
1999–00 Vancouver Canucks NHL 47 21 17 38 16
1999–00 New Jersey Devils NHL 12 3 3 6 4 23 4 3 7 4
2000–01 New Jersey Devils NHL 75 43 40 83 43 25 5 11 16 8
2001–02 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 66 24 33 57 8 20 8 3 11 8
2002–03 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 33 46 79 12 6 5 2 7 4
2003–04 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 37 8 22 30 12 13 2 4 6 8
2005–06 New Jersey Devils NHL 34 12 13 25 6
2005–06 Albany River Rats AHL 19 4 10 14 17
NHL totals 990 473 559 1032 432 124 39 47 86 58


International play

Played for the Soviet Union in:



Played for Russia in:

International statistics
Year Team Event Place   GP G A Pts PIM
1987 Soviet Union WJC DSQ 6 3 2 5 4
1988 Soviet Union WJC 7 9 9 18 2
1988 Soviet Union Oly 6 3 2 5 2
1989 Soviet Union WJC 7 7 5 12 4
1989 Soviet Union WC 10 0 3 3 2
1996 Russia WCH SF 5 2 4 6 0
Junior Int'l Totals 20 19 16 35 10
Senior Int'l Totals 21 5 9 14 4

See also



External links



note: Mogilny served as captain, during most of the 1993–94 season, while Pat LaFontaine was injured & out of the line-up



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