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This article is about the student fraternity of the United States. For the student fraternity of the Philippines, see Alpha Tau Omega .


ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) (commonly known as, ATOs, Taus, or Alpha Taus) is an American Leadership fraternity that annually ranks among the top ten national fraternities for number of chapters, and total number of members. ATO has more than 250 active and inactive chapters with more than 200,000 members and more than 6,500 active undergraduate members. The 200,000th member was initiated in early 2009. The ATΩ Foundation provides more than $150,000 in annual scholarships to members including scholarships to attend the LeaderShape Institute, Inc. ATO is also one-third of the Lexington Triad, along with Kappa Alpha Order and Sigma Nu. The oldest active chapter is the Delta Chapter located at the University of Virginiamarker. The newest active chapter is the Kappa Lambda Chapter at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan; it was chartered on September 26, 2009. Also, Alpha Tau Omega does not have chapters or affiliated organizations in the Philippines or in any other countries or territories outside of the United States→[771761]

History

During and after the Civil War, families were torn apart, due to brothers fighting on opposite sides. A Virginia Military Institutemarker student, Otis Allan Glazebrook, had a vision to reunite the North and the South in brotherhood. His ideals started Alpha Tau Omega as the first fraternity that would be considered a national fraternity, and it was with Erskine Mayo Ross and Alfred Marshall that he sought to bring together the two factions that had been torn apart. ATΩ was not established in imitation of or in opposition to any existing fraternity. In June 1935, the ATΩ Foundation's inception occurred at the 34th Congress in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1950 Indiana University Worthy Master Robert Lollar created "Help Week" setting the pledges to doing good deeds around campus and replacing the traditional "Hell Week." The LeaderShape Institute, Inc. was created in 1986 by Alpha Tau Omega, and today is considered one of the nation's finest leadership skills training programs in the country. ATΩ was honored by the Smithsonian Institutionmarker for innovative use of technology with an award for Information Technology in the field of Government and Non-Profit Organizations in June 1995. The award was given for ATΩ's innovative use of CompuServe as a communications tool.

A more complete history of Alpha Tau Omega may be viewed on their homepage here →[771762]

Creed

The Creed of Alpha Tau Omega:

To bind men together in a brotherhood based upon eternal and immutable principles, with a bond as strong as right itself and as lasting as humanity; to know no North, no South , no East , no West but to know man as man , to teach that true men the world over should stand together and contend for supremacy of good over evil; to teach, not politics, but morals; to foster, not partisanship, but the recognition of true merit wherever found; to have no narrower limits within which to work together for the elevation of man than the outlines of the world: These were the thoughts and hopes uppermost in the minds of the founders of the Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity.-Otis Allan Glazebrook 1880

Founders

Otis Allan Glazebrook, Alfred Marshall, and Erskine Mayo Ross are recognized as the three founders of ATO. Following these, the next leader of ATO was Thomas Arkle Clark; Clark was the first Dean education at the [[University of Illinois and the President of the Gamma Zeta chapter at the University. Thomas A. Clark served the national fraternity as "Worthy Grand Chief" for several terms. To this day, the highest honor a graduating senior can achieve is the Thomas Arkle Clark Award.

Another man, Joseph R. Anderson, is known as the second founder of ATO. Because of a lack of organization and many chapters ignoring their responsibilities to the national fraternity—including financial ones, ATO was on a devastating decline. In 1876, of the 22 chapters in existence at the time, only 2 attended the annual Congress. Joseph R. Anderson was appointed and accepted the position of Senior Grand Chief, or the National President, in 1870. Under Anderson, ATO was able to get back on track and become the well established fraternity it is today.

The Firsts

ATΩ was the first fraternity founded after the Civil War in 1865 , striving to heal the wounds created by the devastating war and help reunite the North and South.

ATΩ was the first fraternity founded as a national fraternity, not a local or sectional fellowship.

ATΩ was the first fraternity founded on Christian principles, not Greek

The first meeting of ATΩ was at 114 E. Clay St. in Richmond, Virginia, where Glazebrook read the Constitution of ATΩ to Marshall and Ross for the first time.

The first chapter north of the Mason - Dixon line, was chartered at the University of Pennsylvaniamarker sixteen years after the founding of ATΩ, helping to bring a realization to the founders' dreams.

The ATΩ chapter at the University of the South (Sewanee) was the first of any fraternity in the South to have a chapter house in 1880.

ATΩ's first fraternity west of the Rockies and first of any fraternity in the Northwest was at Oregon State University with the chartering in 1882.

Thomas Arkle Clark, the first initiate of the Gamma Zeta chapter at the University of Illinois, was the nation's first college dean of men.

The first World War I Medal of Honor was given to Captain C. L. Irwin, Wyoming '13, as one of the first American heroes mentioned in dispatches to the U.S.

ATΩ was the first national fraternity to start a chapter free of alcohol and tobacco on fraternity property.

ATΩ was the first national fraternity to sponsor and conduct co-educational leadership conferences nationwide in 1992.

Famous ATO members

References



External links




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