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The Blackstone Memorial of 1891 was a petition written by William Eugene Blackstone, a Christian Restorationist, in favor of the delivery of Palestine to the Jews. It was signed by many leading American citizens and presented to President Harrison.

The Memorial was motivated by concern over the plight of the Jews in Russiamarker where they were being murdered in government-incited pogroms. It argued that it would be politically unwise to ask the Russian government to desist, "What shall be done for the Russian Jews? It is both unwise and useless to undertake to dictate to Russia concerning her internal affairs." But assumed that they would not be welcome in western countries, "Where shall 2,000,000 of such poor people go? Europe is crowded and has no room for more peasant population. Shall they come to America? This will be a tremendous expense, and require years."There was a solution:

"Why not give Palestine back to them again? According to God's distribution of nations it is their home, an inalienable possession from which they were expelled by force."

"Why shall not the powers which under the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, gave Bulgariamarker to the Bulgarians and |Serbia|Servia]] to the Servians now give Palestine back to the Jews? These provinces, as well as Roumaniamarker, Montenegromarker, and Greecemarker, were wrested from the Turks and given to their natural owners. Does not Palestine as rightfully belong to the Jews?"

The Memorial petition was circulated in five major cities: Bostonmarker, Baltimoremarker, Philadelphiamarker, New Yorkmarker, and Chicagomarker. It was signed by many prominent citizens from those cities: financiers John D. Rockefeller and J. P. Morgan, future President William McKinley, and Chief Justice Melville Fuller; many members of Congress; the editors of all major newspapers in those five cities, including the still-extant Boston Globe, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, and Washington Post; and a long list of university and seminary presidents, mayors, and leading businessmen.

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