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Boeing Commercial Airplanes is a unit of The Boeing Company, based in Renton, Washingtonmarker consisting of the Seattlemarker-based former Boeing Airplane Company (the civil airliner division), as well as the Long Beachmarker-based Douglas Aircraft division of the former McDonnell Douglas Corporation. In 2006, Boeing was the world’s largest civil aircraft company in terms of orders, overtaking Airbus for the first time since 2000. President and CEO Alan Mulally led Boeing's civil aircraft arm, until he was nominated as CEO of Ford Motor Company on 5 September 2006. He was succeeded by Scott Carson.

Airplane numbering system

The Boeing numbering system for commercial airliners starts with the airplane's model number, e.g. 377 followed by a dash and three digits (two numbers) following the pattern Boeing xxx-scc. In general, since the Boeing 707, the model number takes the form of a 7 followed by a digit and then by another 7, e.g. 737.

The series number is a single digit (s), e.g. -200. The following two digits number (cc) is attributed according to the company to which the aircraft was first delivered. These two digits are called Boeing customer codes. For instance, a Boeing 747-400 delivered to Malaysia Airlines would take the designation "747-4H6" while a 777-200 delivered to American Airlines would take the designation "777-223". See List of Boeing customer codes for a more complete list.

Additional letters are sometimes used. These include, "ER" for an "extended range" version or "LR" for the "long range" version.

Current production

Product list and details (date information from Boeing)
Aircraft Variants Description Nickname Capacity 1st flight 1st delivery Launch Customer In Service Out of Production Models
737 600, 700, 700C, 700ER, 800, 900ER Twin‑engined narrowbody 85‑215 Apr 9, 1967 Dec 28, 1967 Lufthansamarker Feb 10, 1968 100, 200, 200C, 200 Adv, 300, 400, 500
747 400F, 400ERF, 400BCF, 8I, 8F Four‑engine, partial double decker, large widebody Jumbo Jet 366‑524 Feb 9, 1969 Dec 13, 1969 Pan American Airways and Trans World Airlines Jan 21, 1970 100, 100SR, 100B, 200, 200F, 200C, SP, 200M, 300, 300M, 300SR, 400, 400M, 400D
767 200ER, 300ER, 300F, 400ER, KC-767 Tanker Twin engine, medium widebody 180‑375 Sep 26, 1981 Aug 19, 1982 United Airlines Sep 8, 1982 200, 300
777 200ER, 200LR, 300ER, Freighter Twin engine, medium to large widebody Triple Seven, Worldliner (200LR only) 301‑550 Jun 12, 1994 May 15, 1995 United Airlines Jun 7, 1995 200, 300
BBJ BBJ, BBJ2, BBJ3 Twin engine executive jet 20‑50 Oct 1998 Nov 1998 Nov 1998 All currently in production (December 2008)
787 3, 8, 9 Twin engine short (3) & long (8, 9) range widebody Dreamliner 210-330 Late-2009 2010 All Nippon Airways 2010 All currently in production (December 2008)


Future products
Expected
EIS
Type Description Notes
2009 Sukhoi Superjet 100 Twin-engine narrowbody risk sharing partner with Sukhoi
2010 787 Dreamliner Twin-engine widebody Launch Customers: All Nippon Airways and Air New Zealand
2009 747-8 Freighter Four-engine widebody freighter Launch Customers: Cargolux and Nippon Cargo Airlines
2010 747-8 Intercontinental Four-engined widebody Launch Customer: Lufthansamarker
2010 747 BBJ Four-engine widebody executive jet based on 747-8
787 BBJ Twin-engine widebody executive jet based on 787-8 & 787-9
Y1/737RS code name for the 737 and 757-200 replacement project.
Y3 code name for the 747 and 777-300 replacement project.


Deliveries

Boeing 747 under construction at factory in Everett, Washington, USA.


Aircraft production rates
Month 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003
January 29 22 17 20 30
February 36 35 32 25 33
March 41 41 32 32 31
April 35 28 33 22 32
May 40 34 24 27 23
June 39 35 28 26 32
July 33 30 23 20 32
August 42 33 32 25 17
September 34 37 6 22 26
October 42 35 23 20 20
November 36 34 28 23 28
December 34 22 24 23
Year Total 407 398 300 285 310
Monthly Average 37 33.16 25 23.75 25.83


Discontinued aircraft

Boeing

Boeing 707


Aircraft Number
Built
Notes
247 75
307 Stratoliner 10
314 Clipper 12
377 Stratocruiser 56 (civil development of the military B-29)
707/720 1,010
717 156 (formerly the MD-95, evolved from the DC-9 family)
727 1,832
757 1,050


McDonnell Douglas and Douglas Aircraft Company

McDonnell Douglas MD-88
McDonnell Douglas DC-10


Aircraft Number
Built
Notes
DC-1 1
DC-2 156 Similar to the DC-3
DC-3 13,000+ Licensed models were built in Russia and Japan
DC-4 79 4 engines
DC-5 16 High-wing with 2 engines
DC-6 704 4 engines, modernized version of the DC-4
DC-7 338 4 engines, cargo version of DC-6
DC-9 976 Predecessor to the MD-80 and the MD-90
DC-10 446 Also available as the MD-10 upgrade
MD-80 series 1,191 Stretched and modernized version of the DC-9
MD-11 200 Stretched and modernized version of the DC-10
MD-90 117 Stretched and modernized version of the MD-80


Specially built models

Although aircraft are commonly ordered with features or options at the request of the ordering airline, there are certain models which have been built specifically for the customer.

The Boeing 707-138B was a shortened fuselage, long range model only sold to Qantas.

The Boeing 757-200 Combi was a single example model built for Royal Nepal Airlines (later renamed Nepal Airlines), though the engineering design of the freight door was subsequently used when UPSmarker was the launch customer for the 757-200PF several years later.

The 747SP production line was re-opened nearly four years after the supposedly final 747SP was built. One aircraft was built for the United Arab Emiratesmarker. The cockpit, unlike that of other 747SP, had a crew of two instead of three.

Douglas, prior to its merger with McDonnell, built the DC-9-20 for Scandinavian Airlines. This model combined the fuselage of the DC-9-10 with the wings of a DC-9-30. No other airline ordered the aircraft.

Concept designs



Organization

Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) is currently organized as:

  • Airplane Programs
    • Renton - 737, BBJ, P-8A Poseidon
    • Everett - 747, 767, 777, 787
    • Fabrication Division
    • Global Partners
    • Propulsion Systems
  • 787 Program
  • Commercial Aviation Services


BCA subsidiaries:

Major facilities



See also



References

  1. The Boeing 747
  2. Boeing 787-3 Fact Sheet, 787-8 Fact Sheet, 787-9 Fact Sheet. Boeing.


External links




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