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The China national football team ( ) is the national football team of Chinamarker and is governed by the Chinese Football Association (CFA).

The China national team was founded in 1924 in the Republic of Chinamarker under the auspices of the China Football Association and joined FIFAmarker in 1931. Following the Chinese Civil War, the Chinese Football Association was formed in the newly founded People's Republic of Chinamarker. This body remained part of FIFA until 1958, when it withdrew, rejoining in 1979. They have been perennial contenders for the Asian Cup, most recently finishing second in the 2004 AFC Asian Cup at home. But China failed to score a goal in their maiden FIFA World Cup appearance in the 2002 FIFA World Cup. However just qualifying for the tournament has been considered the greatest accomplishment in China's football history.

After the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kongmarker from the United Kingdommarker in 1997, and Macaumarker from Portugalmarker in 1999, these two special administrative regions have continued to have their own teams, which play as "Hong Kong, China" and "Macau, China", respectively.

As football is widely followed in Chinamarker, national team success is considered to be a source of national pride. Around 300 million people tuned in to broadcasts of China's World Cup 2002 matches with a staggering 170 million new television sets being bought by citizens in order to watch their nation's first World Cup appearance. There were over 250 million viewers for the 2004 Asian Cup final, the largest single-event sports audience in the country's history. The team is colloquially referred to as Team China (中国队), the National Team (国家队) or Guozu (国足, lit. "national foot").

History

1949–1978

The national team under PRC name, played their first match in a friendly against Finland on 4 August 1952, which was one of the first nations to have diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China.

For nearly 30 years, the team primarily played only friendly matches with nations that recognized the PRC, such as Albania, Cambodia, Egypt, Guinea, Hungary, North Korea, North Vietnam, and Sudan.

China also played once in the World Cup qualifying rounds, in 1958.

After re-joining in 1978

The national team began to make their way to national and international prominence in the beginning of the late—1980s through the introduction of televisions in Chinese households. Previously, the most popular international sports in China were the national women's football and volleyball teams as well as men's and women's table tennis. By 1980, China could start competing for a berth in the 1982 World Cup Finals.

Over the next 16 years, however, China missed the World Cup qualification time after time. In 1981, China lost a playoff game against the New Zealand team in a heartbreaking loss for the large home audience that followed the qualification process. During 1986 World Cup qualifying, China faced Hong Kong team in Beijing in the final match of the first qualifying round on May 19, 1985, where China only needed a draw for advance. However, Hong Kong team produced a 2–1 upset win, which resulted in a riot by local fans. During the 1998 World Cup qualifiers, China was on the verge of qualifying, but lost crucial matches at home, especially the matches against Qatar and Iran. Simply because of the demographics of the People's Republic of China, the team arguably has the most fans of any sporting team in the world, as with basketball. As a result, expectations soared in 2001 as China, under the direction of head coach Bora Milutinović, advanced to the World Cup finals in 2002. This was the first time in its history that China reached the finals.

However, the team failed to score a single goal, losing all three group matches and was eliminated from the competition.

Recent history

In recent years, many have pointed to two main weaknesses of the team. Despite a very organized and well-drilled defense, team China lacks good strikers and creative playmakers, who can also keep possession of the ball well. The team's main tactics against stronger teams tend to be both defensive and counterattacking, with long balls to a lone striker, who is quickly dispossessed of the ball due to lack of support.

In 2004, Dutch coach Arie Haan summed up his impression of Chinese football by saying, "Chinese players are very skilled, but the problem seemed to be related to the culture and psychology of the players," and that the psychological aspect tended to strongly influence the players. Former captain Li Weifeng illustrated this when he said that the Chinese team usually expects wins against weaker opposition but quickly gets irritated when things do not go to plan. This has often been attributed to the pressure, due to massive public expectations of the team during the World Cup qualifiers, for example. Many critics also point to the complacency of the team at critical moments, especially when they are holding a lead or playing weaker teams. In the 2006 World Cup qualifiers, the team managed to only score a single goal against Hong Kong in Hong Kongmarker, a team which China was expected to washout with goals. European coaches who have worked or been in China often cite a lack of professionalism and discipline in Chinese football as the reasons for the Chinese national team's overall weakness. An example of this is the rampant corruption of the first division of the professional Chinese football league, especially the 'black whistles' scandals involving bribed referees fixing matches. This may be seen as an extension of modern Chinese society developing in a complex world of traditional culture involving personal relationships and capitalism.

Recently, an increasing number of talented, young Chinese players have moved to Europe to gain experience in a professional setting. Many are or were key players in the national team, such as Du Wei (Celtic), Zheng Zhi (Charlton Athletic), Li Tie (mainly Everton), Sun Jihai (Manchester City and Sheffield United), Shao Jiayi (1860 Munich and Energie Cottbus), Sun Xiang (PSV), Zhang Enhua (Grimsby Town), Ma Mingyu (Perugia), Fan Zhiyi (Crystal Palace and Dundee), Li Jinyu (Nancy), Yang Chen (best performances for Eintracht Frankfurt), and Xie Hui (best performances for Alemannia Aachen). Rising star striker Dong Fangzhuo played for Manchester United, and after several successful seasons with Belgian club Royal Antwerp, his Premiership debut came in a match against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge. Another potential star is Yu Dabao, who has been regularly scoring for the Benfica B team and is touted to break into the senior Benfica team next season. More players with European experience may yield better results for the national team. Key players Li Tie and Li Jinyu were part of the 'Jianlibao' team in the mid—1990s that trained young, talented players in Brazilmarker.

The national team has produced some displays of controlled and creative football in friendlies, especially during the 0–0 draw against Brazil in November 2002 and the 3–1 loss to France in May 2006. After the 0–0 draw with Brazil, Cafu complimented the Chinese performance and said they were definitely capable of qualifying for the 2006 World Cup. The team, however, failed to advance through the preliminary qualification stage, losing to Kuwait on goals scored, even though China scored seven goals in a blow-out against Hong Kong in the last qualifying match. While qualifying for the 2007 Asian Cup, the team became the subject of immense criticism in the media and a national embarrassment when it scored only one goal (a Shao Jiayi penalty kick well into final injury time) against Singapore at home in Tianjinmarker, and tied the Southeast Asian city-state in the away game. In preparation for the 2007 Asian Cup, the team spend the weeks leading up to the tournament on a tour of the United States. While the 4–1 loss to a streaking United States was not unexpected, a 1–0 loss to a Real Salt Lake team that had been winless in MLS raised many eyebrows.

In the Asian Cup 2007 tournament, the team played three inconsistent games, winning against Malaysia, drawing Iran after leading 2–0 at half time, and losing to Uzbekistan with an embarrassing 3–0 scoreline. Under high expectations, China's performance drew immense criticism on online communities, which condemned the coach Zhu Guanghu, players, along with the Chinese Football Association in general. Zhu was later replaced by Vladimir Petrović for this poor performance. Some commented that China's reliance on foreign coaches for the past decade has been an indicator of its poor domestic coach development system. In June 2008, China had another poor performance at the World Cup Qualifiers, losing against Qatar and Iraq, and therefore missed the 2010 World Cup.

Rivalries

Traditionally, China's greatest rival has been Japan (although this is not typically reciprocated from the Japanese side). This was exemplified in August 2004 that saw rioting by Chinese fans near the north gate of Beijing's Workers Stadiummarker towards the end of the match between the two sides at the Asian Cup 2004 final, which Japan won 3–1 (accompanied by a handball). The rioting was said to be provoked by controversial officiating and anti-Japanese sentiment resulting from historical tensions arising from several military conflicts between the two nations from the late-nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century (see First and Second Sino-Japanese Wars), as well as from lingering controversies, such as the issue of Japanmarker's use of comfort women during World War II. China's most recent major tournament meeting with Japan was at the 2008 East Asian Football Championship finals in Chinamarker, where Japan beat China 1-0. China went on to finish third in the tournament.

One well-known rivalry is with neighbour South Korea. Although not as flammable as the rivalry with Japanmarker, it is interesting to note that while China has played about 30 matches against South Korea since 1950 they have never won a head-to-head match. This is despite China finishing higher than South Korea in a number of tournaments. The media has coined the term "Koreaphobia" to describe such embarrassing phenomenon. China's most recent major tournament meeting with South Korea was at the 2008 East Asian Football Championship finals in Chinamarker, where Korea beat China 3-2.

Home stadium

The Workers Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in Beijing, China. It is mostly used for football matches. The stadium was built in 1959 and it was last renovated in 2004. It currently has a capacity of 70,161.

The stadium was the main venue for the 1990 Asian Games, where the opening and closing ceremonies were held. Beijing Guoan Football Club also play their home league games at the stadium.

Media coverage

Home and away matches are shown on CCTV-5, GDTV-Sports, STV-Sports, BTV-6 and the other local sports channels.

Kits

China's home kit is all red and the away kit is all white. The team's kit is currently sponsored by Adidas. China in certain climates use special heat body cooling vests.

Fixtures and results

Honours

Runners-up (2): 1984, 2004
Third places (2): 1976, 1992


Silver medal (1): 1994
Bronze medal (2): 1978, 1998


Winners (1): 2005
Runners-up (2): 1990, 1998
Third places (2): 2003, 2008


Competition history

  • Pos = Position; P = Matches played; W = Matches won; D = Matches drawn; L = Matches lost; F = Goals for; A = Goals against.
  • Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.


FIFA World Cup record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1930 to 1954 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1958 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
1962 to 1978 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1982 to 1998 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
2002 First round 31 3 0 0 3 0 9
2006 to 2010 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Total 1/19 - 3 0 0 3 0 9


AFC Asian Cup record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1956 to 1972 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1976 Third Place 3 4 1 1 2 2 4
1980 First round 7 4 1 1 2 9 5
1984 Runner-up 2 6 4 0 2 11 4
1988 Fourth Place 4 6 2 2 2 7 5
1992 Third Place 3 5 1 3 1 6 6
1996 Quarter-finals 6 4 1 0 3 6 7
2000 Fourth Place 4 6 2 2 2 11 7
2004 Runner-up 2 6 3 2 1 13 6
2007 First round 9 3 1 1 1 7 6
2011 - - - - - - - -
Total 9/15 - 44 16 12 16 72 50
For 2011, see 2011 AFC Asian Cup qualification

Olympic Games record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1900 to 1928 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1936 First round 12 1 0 0 1 0 2
1948 First round 14 1 0 0 1 0 4
1952 to 1956 Withdrew after qualifying - 0 0 0 0 0 0
1960 to 1976 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1980 to 1984 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
1988 First round 14 3 0 1 2 0 5
Total* 4/25 - 8 0 2 6 1 17
* Including 1988 onwards

For 1992 to 2012, see China national under-23 football team

Asian Games record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1951 to 1970 Did not enter - - - - - - -
1974 First round 10 3 1 0 2 7 4
1978 Third place 3 7 5 0 2 16 5
1982 Quarter-finals 11 4 2 1 1 4 3
1986 Quarter-finals 9 4 2 1 1 10 7
1990 Quarter-finals 10 4 2 0 2 8 4
1994 Runners-up 2 7 5 1 1 16 8
1998 Third place 3 8 6 0 2 24 7
Total* 9/15 - 45 29 4 12 102 43
* Including 1998 onwards

For 2002 to 2010, see China national under-23 football team

East Asian Cup record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1990 Runners-up 2 4 2 1 1 4 2
1992 Fourth place 4 3 0 1 2 2 6
1995 Fourth place 4 4 0 3 1 2 3
1998 Runners-up 2 3 2 0 1 4 2
2003 Third place 3 3 1 0 2 3 4
2005 Champions 1 3 1 2 0 5 3
2008 Third place 3 3 1 0 2 5 5
2010 - - - - - - - -
Total 7/8 - 23 7 7 9 25 25


Far Eastern Championship Games record

Year Result Pos P W D L F A
1913 Runners-up 2 2 1 0 1 2 2
1915 Champions 1 3 1 2 0 2 1
1917 Champions 1 2 2 0 0 8 0
1919 Champions 1 3 2 0 1 5 3
1921 Champions 1 2 2 0 0 5 1
1923 Champions 1 2 2 0 0 8 1
1925 Champions 1 2 2 0 0 7 1
1927 Champions 1 2 2 0 0 8 2
1930 Champions 1 2 1 1 0 8 3
1934 Champions 1 3 3 0 0 7 3
Total 10/10 9 23 18 3 2 60 17


Player history

China captains

Period Captain Vice Captain Third Captain
1951 Wang Shouxian - -
1952–1954 Guo Hongbin - -
1955–1959 Sun Fucheng - -
1960–1964 Chen Jialiang - -
1965–1969 Gao Fengwen Xu Genbao -
1969–1972 Gao Fengwen Qi Wusheng Xiang Hengqing
1972–1975 Qi Wusheng Xu Genbao Xiang Hengqing
1976–1979 Xiang Hengqing Chi Shangbin He Jia
1979–1981 Chi Shangbin Rong Zhihang Huang Xiangdong
1981–1982 Chi Shangbin Huang Xiangdong Zuo Shusheng
1983–1985 Zuo Shusheng Li Fusheng
1986–1987 Zhu Bo Jia Xiuquan Ma Lin
1987–1988 Jia Xiuquan Zhu Bo Ma Lin
1989–1992 Zhu Bo Jia Xiuquan Ma Lin
1993–1994 Zhu Bo Wu Qunli Xu Hong
1994–1996 Xu Hong
1996–1997 Fan Zhiyi Xu Hong
1998–1999 Fan Zhiyi Zhang Enhua
2000–2001 Ma Mingyu Li Ming Qi Hong
2002 Ma Mingyu Fan Zhiyi Jiang Jin
2003–2004 Li Weifeng Zheng Zhi Zhao Junzhe
2005–2006 Li Weifeng Zhao Junzhe Ji Mingyi
2006 Zheng Zhi Zhao Junzhe Ji Mingyi
2007 Zheng Zhi Sun Jihai Ji Mingyi
2008 Zheng Zhi Li Weifeng Zhao Junzhe
present Du Wei Wang Xiao Zhou Haibin


Most capped players

As of June 22, 2008, the players with the most caps for China are:

Pos Player Caps Tenure
1 Li Ming 141 1991–2004
2 Jia Xiuquan 136 1982–1993
3 Fan Zhiyi 132 1987–2002
4 Xie Yuxin 120 1987–1996
5 Li Fusheng 119 1976–1984
6 Hao Haidong 116 1987–2004
7 Lin Lefeng 113 1977–1986
8 Ou Chuliang 109 1990–2002
9 Li Weifeng 105 1997–present


* The players in bold typeface are still active in football.

Top goalscorers

As of Nov 14, 2009, the players with the most goals scored for China are:

Pos Player Goals Tenure
1 Hao Haidong 41 1987 - 2004
2 Liu Haiguang 36 1983 - 1990
3 Ma Lin 33 1984 - 1990
4 Li Hui 28 1983 - 1988
5 Su Maozhen 26 1992 - 2002
5 Li Jinyu 26 1996 - present
7 Zuo Shusheng 23 1979 - 1985
8 Zhao Dayu 19 1982 - 1986
8 Fan Zhiyi 19 1987 - 2002
8 Mai Chao 19 1986 - 1992
11 Gu Guangming 15 1979 - 1985
12 Jia Xiuquan 14 1982 - 1993
12 Qu Bo 14 2000 - present
14 Xie Yuxin 13 1987 - 1996
14 Li Weifeng 13 1997 - present
16 Peng Weiguo 12 1992 - 2000
16 Huang Xiangdong 12 1977 - 1983
16 Ma Mingyu 12 1993 - 2002
16 Zheng Zhi 12 1998 - present
20 Gao Hongbo 11 1992 - 1997
20 Yang Chen 11 1995 - 2004
20 Qi Hong 11 1997 - 2004
* The players in bold typeface are still active in football.

China squad

Most recent squad



Squad called up for the training session from 4 November to 23 November 2009.

Name DOB Club Caps (Goals)
Goalkeepers
Guan Zhen Feb 6, 1985 Jiangsu Sainty 1 (0)
Yang Zhi Jun 6, 1983 Beijing Guoan 9 (0)
Zeng Cheng Jan 8, 1987 Henan Construction 3 (0)
Defenders
Li Weifeng Dec 1, 1978 Suwon Bluewings 106 (13)
Du Wei Feb 9, 1982 Shanghai Shenhua 42 (3)
Feng Xiaoting Oct 22, 1985 Daegu FC 12 (0)
Liu Jianye Jun 17, 1987 Changsha Ginde 6 (0)
Rong Hao Apr 7, 1984 Jiangsu Sainty 10 (0)
Sun Xiang Jan 15, 1982 Shanghai Shenhua 49 (4)
Wan Houliang Feb 25, 1986 Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors 2 (0)
Wang Qiang Jul 23, 1984 Changsha Ginde 4 (0)
Zhao Peng Jun 20, 1983 Henan Construction 9 (1)
Midfielders
Cui Peng May 31, 1987 Shandong Luneng 3 (0)
Deng Zhuoxiang Oct 24, 1988 Jiangsu Sainty 6 (0)
Hao Junmin Mar 24, 1987 Tianjin Teda 26 (5)
Huang Bowen Jul 13, 1987 Beijing Guoan 11 (1)
Xu Yang Jun 18, 1987 Henan Construction 1 (0)
Yan Feng Feb 7, 1982 Changchun Yatai 2 (0)
Yang Hao Aug 19, 1983 Beijing Guoan 8 (2)
Yu Hanchao Feb 25, 1987 Liaoning Hongyun 3 (0)
Yu Hai Jun 4, 1987 Shaanxi Chanba 6 (3)
Zhao Xuri Dec 3, 1985 Dalian Shide 30 (1)
Zheng Long Apr 15, 1988 Qingdao Jonoon 6 (1)
Zheng Zhi Aug 20, 1980 Celtic 49 (12)
Strikers
Gao Lin Feb 14, 1986 Shanghai Shenhua 30 (6)
Han Peng Sep 13, 1983 Shandong Luneng 27 (9)
Jiang Ning Sep 1, 1986 Qingdao Jonoon 19 (2)
Qu Bo Jul 15, 1981 Qingdao Jonoon 70(14)


Recent call-ups (within the last 12 months)

Name DOB Club Caps (Goals) Last Appearance
Goalkeepers
Song Zhenyu Sep 11, 1981 Changsha Ginde 12 (0) v Vietnam (Jan 21, 2009)
Yang Jun Jun 10, 1981 Tianjin Teda 4 (0) v Saudi Arabia (Jun 4, 2009)
Zong Lei Jul 26, 1981 Changchun Yatai 12 (0) v Iran (Dec 19, 2008)
Defenders
Cao Yang Dec 15, 1981 Tianjin Teda 32 (2) v Saudi Arabia (Jun 4, 2009)
Chen Lei Oct 16, 1985 Shenzhen Asia Travel 2 (0) v Singapore (Aug 12, 2009)
He Yang Feb 23, 1983 Tianjin Teda 1 (0) v Iran (Jun 1, 2009)
Jiao Zhe Aug 21, 1981 Shandong Luneng 5 (0) v Vietnam (Jan 21, 2009)
Wang Xiao Aug 30, 1979 Tianjin Teda 13 (0) v Syria (Jan 14, 2009)
Wu Hao Feb 19, 1983 Shandong Luneng 8 (0) v Vietnam (Jan 21, 2009)
Yuan Weiwei Nov 25, 1985 Shandong Luneng 3 (0) v Jordan (Dec 21, 2008)
Zhang Xiaofei Jul 11, 1982 Changchun Yatai 7 (0) v Jordan (Dec 21, 2009)
Zhang Yaokun Apr 17, 1981 Dalian Shide 39 (3) v Syria (Jan 14, 2009)
Midfielders
Chen Tao Mar 11, 1985 Shanghai Shenhua 9 (0) v Kyrgyzstan (Jul 25, 2009)
Du Zhenyu Feb 10, 1983 Changchun Yatai 24 (2) v Vietnam (Jan 21, 2009)
Hui Jiakang Jan 15, 1989 Unattached 1 (0) v Iran (Dec 19, 2008)
Liu Jian Aug 20, 1984 Qingdao Jonoon 21 (4) v Iran (Jun 1, 2009)
Liu Jindong Dec 9, 1981 Shandong Luneng 14 (1) v Singapore (Aug 12, 2009)
Shen Longyuan Mar 2, 1985 Shanghai Shenhua 5 (0) v Vietnam (Jan 21, 2009)
Wang Dong Sep 10, 1981 Changchun Yatai 30 (4) v Syria (Jan 14, 2009)
Wang Xinxin Apr 27, 1981 Tianjin Teda 5 (1) v Saudi Arabia (Jun 4, 2009)
Wang Yongpo Jan 19, 1987 Shandong Luneng 1 (0) v Iran (Jun 1, 2009)
Wu Wei'an Sep 1, 1981 Tianjin Teda 5 (1) v Saudi Arabia (Jun 4, 2009)
Zhou Haibin Jul 19, 1985 PSV Eindhoven 39 (3) v Iran (Jun 1, 2009)
Strikers
Cao Tianbao Apr 3, 1982 Changchun Yatai 1 (0) v Iran (Jun 1, 2009)
Du Wenhui Dec 19, 1983 Beijing Guoan 3 (0) v Iran (Dec 19, 2008)
Mao Biao Jul 24, 1987 Tianjin Teda 1 (0) v Saudi Arabia (Jun 4, 2009)
Shi Jun Oct 9, 1982 Chengdu Blades 6 (0) v Jordan (Dec 21, 2008)
Tan Yang Jan 9, 1989 Hangzhou Greentown 1 (0) v Palestine (Jul 18, 2009)
Yang Xu Feb 12, 1987 Liaoning Hongyun 1 (0) v Botswana (Sep 30, 2009)
Zhu Ting Jul 15, 1985 Dalian Shide 16 (3) v Iran (Jan 9, 2009)


Previous squads



Coaching staff

Current coaching staff

Head Coach Gao Hongbo
Assistant coaches Fu Bo
Ou Chuliang


List of head coaches

# Name Period Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Achievements
1 Li Fenglou 1951–1952 1 0 0 1 0 4 00.00%
2 A Joseph 1954–1956 3 2 0 1 4 6 66.67%
3 Dai Linjing 1957 4 1 1 2 5 7 25.00%
4 Chen Chengda 1958–1962 7 4 0 3 14 8 57.14%
5 Nian Weisi 1963 13 7 3 3 26 11 53.85%
6 Fang Renqiu 1964 0 0 0 0 0 0 00.00%
7 Nian Weisi (2nd time) 1965–1973 28 19 6 3 97 40 67.86%
Nian Weisi

Ren Bin
1974–1976 27 14 5 8 58 40 51.85% 3rd place at the 1976 AFC Asian Cup
8 Zhang Honggen 1977 10 6 1 3 20 12 60.00%
9 Nian Weisi (3rd time) 1978 14 8 1 5 25 12 57.14% Bronze medal at the 1978 Asian Games
10 Zhang Honggen (2nd time) 1979 0 0 0 0 0 0 00.00%
11 Nian Weisi (4th time) 1980 5 2 2 1 11 4 40.00%
12 Su Yongshun 1980–1982 20 9 5 6 20 18 45.00%
13 Zhang Honggen (3rd time) 1982 10 3 5 2 11 10 30.00%
14 Zeng Xuelin 1983–1985 42 24 6 12 99 35 57.14% Runners-up of the 1984 AFC Asian Cup
15 Nian Weisi (5th time) 1985–1986 26 14 7 5 44 24 53.85%
16 Gao Fengwen 1986–1990 56 27 13 16 112 40 48.21% 4th place at the 1988 AFC Asian Cup
17 Xu Genbao 1991–1992 5 3 0 2 9 10 60.00%
18 Klaus Schlappner 1992–1993 25 9 6 10 35 27 36.00% 3rd place at the 1992 AFC Asian Cup
19 Qi Wusheng 1994–1997 55 27 13 15 97 60 49.09% Silver medal at the 1994 Asian Games
20 Bobby Houghton 1997–1999 17 10 3 4 36 15 58.82% Bronze medal at the 1998 Asian Games
* Jin Zhiyang (caretaker) 2000 5 5 0 0 31 0 100.00%
21 Bora Milutinović Jan 2000–Jun 2002 46 20 11 15 75 50 43.48% Round 1 of the 2002 FIFA World Cup

4th place at the 2000 AFC Asian Cup
* Shen Xiangfu (caretaker) 2002 3 1 2 0 5 3 33.33%
22 Arie Haan Dec 2002–Nov 2004 30 17 7 6 52 22 56.67% Runners-up of the 2004 AFC Asian Cup
23 Zhu Guanghu Mar 2005–Jul 2007 27 9 6 12 35 37 33.33% Winners of the East Asian Cup 2005
24 Vladimir Petrović

Ratomir Dujković
Sep 2007–Jun 2008 18 6 7 5 28 16 33.33% Third place at the East Asian Cup 2008
* Yin Tiesheng (caretaker) Dec 2008–Jan 2009 6 2 0 4 11 12 33.33%
25 Gao Hongbo Apr 2009– 12 6 5 1 19 10 45.00%


References and notes

  1. FootballAsia.com, Asian Cup final smashes viewing records, 12 August 2004.
  2. China Daily. Jobless Haan reflects China's football crisis. 2004-11-20.
  3. ESPNSoccernet. 'Hand of Koji' brings Japan third title Aug. 8, 2004
  4. Gulf Times – Qatar’s top-selling English daily newspaper - First Page
  5. Sporting Vests - New Cooling Vest Product - Body Cooling Vest Sport Cooling Vest - ARCTIC HEAT USA


See also



External links




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