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The Demographics of Ukraine is about the demographic features of the population of Ukrainemarker, including population growth, population density, ethnicity, education level, health, economic status, religious affiliations, and other aspects of the population.

The data in this article are based on the most recent Ukrainian Census, which was carried out in 2001, the CIA World Factbook, and the State Statistics Committee of Ukraine.

Population of Ukraine (in millions) from 1950-2009.


Demographic statistics

Births, deaths and net migration in Ukraine from 2003 to 2008.


Population

46,115,941 (February 2009)

Age structure

  • 0–14 years: 13.9% (male 3,277,905/female 3,106,012)
  • 15–64 years: 70% (male 15,443,818/female 16,767,931)
  • 65 years and over: 16.1% (male 2,489,235/female 4,909,386) (2008 est.)


Median age

  • total: 39.4 years
  • male: 36.1 years
  • female: 42.5 years (2008 est.)


Population growth rate

-5.3 persons/1,000 population (2008)

Birth rate

11.0 births/1,000 population (2008)

Death rate

16.3 deaths/1,000 population (2008)

Net migration rate

0.3 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2008)

Sex ratio

  • at birth: 1.06 male(s)/female
  • under 15 years: 1.06 male(s)/female
  • 15–64 years: 0.92 male(s)/female
  • 65 years and over: 0.51 male(s)/female
  • total population: 0.8375 male(s)/female (2008 est.)


Infant mortality rate

  • 10.4 deaths/1,000 infants (2008)


Life expectancy at birth

  • total population: 68.06 years
  • male: 62.24 years
  • female: 74.24 years (2008 est.)


Total fertility rate

1.25 children born/woman (2008 est.)

HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate

1.46% (2006 est.)

HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS

377,600 (2006 est.)

HIV/AIDS - deaths

20,000 (2003 est.)

Nationality

  • noun: Ukrainian(s)
  • adjective: Ukrainian


Ethnic groups

[[File:Ukraine cencus 2001 Ethnic groups.svg|thumb|250px|National structure of the population of Ukraine (2001).



]]Ukrainian 77.8%, Russian 17.3%, Romanian 0.8% (includingMoldovan 0.5%), Belarusian 0.6%, Crimean Tatar 0.5%, Bulgarian 0.4%, Hungarian 0.3%, Polish 0.3%, Jewish 0.2%, Greeks 0.2% and other 1.6% (including Albanians, otherwise known as Torbesh, old communities of Armenians living on the Sea of Azovmarker, and a microcosm of Gotlandermarker Swedes of Gammalsvenskbymarker).

Religions

Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Kiev Patriarchy 50.4%, Ukrainian Orthodox Church 26.1%, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church 8%, Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church 7.2%, Roman Catholic 2.2%, Protestant 2.2%, Islam 0.65%, Jewish 0.6%, other 2.55% (2008 est.)

Languages

Ukrainian 67%, Russian 30%, Crimean Tatar, Bulgarian-, Romanian-, Polish-, Hungarian-, Rusyn-speaking minorities and small remnants of a Yiddish speaking group among the local Jews.

Literacy

  • definition: age 15 and over can read and write
  • total population: 99.4%
  • male: 99.7%
  • female: 99.2% (2001 census)


Historical Data

The historical information is taken out of Demoscope.ru. Please, note that territory of the modern Ukraine at the times listed above varied greatly. The western regions of Ukraine, west of Zbruch rivermarker, until 1939 for most of time were part of the Kingdom Galicia and later the Polish Republicmarker. The detailed information for those territories is missing, for more information see Demographics of Poland. The Crimean peninsula was changing hands as well, in 1897 it was a part of the Taurida Governorate, but after the October Revolution became part of the Russian SFSR, and later was turned under the administration of the Ukrainian SSR. The territory of Budjak (southern Bessarabiamarker) became a part of the Ukrainian SSR in June 1940. The censuses of 1926 through 1989 were taken in the Ukrainian SSR. The census of 1897 is taken with the correspondence to nine gubernias that included in the territory of today's Ukraine. The statistics of 1905 records are taken from www.statoids.com which provides a broad degree of historical explanation on the situation in the Imperial Russiamarker. The census statistics of 1931 was estimated by the professor Zenon Kuzela of Berlin. His calculations are as of January 1, 1931. This ethnograph is mentioned in the encyclopedia of Ukraine as one of the sources only available due to lack of the official census.The 2001 census was the first official census of the independent republic of Ukraine. The 2009 stats were taken from the official web-site of www.ukrstat.gov.ua and represent the data as of February, 2009.

Regional Differences in Demographics

Ethnic Ukrainians in Ukraine by oblast (2001)
Between the Soviet census of 1989 and the Ukrainian census of 2001, Ukraine's population declined from 51,271,996 to 48,077,020, a loss of 3,194,976 people or 6.23% of the 1989 population. Making it to date a country with the lowest birth rate in Europe However, this trend has been quite uneven and varied regionally. Three regions in western Ukraine — Volyn, Rivne, and Zakarpattia saw a slight population increase of 0.2%, 0.8% and 1%, respectively. Collectively, between 1989 and 2001 the seven western regions annexed to the USSR in 1939 lost 119,893 people or 1.2% of their 1989 population. The total population of these regions in 2001 was 9,593,800.

Between 1989 and 2001, the population of Kiev regionmarker increased by 6.9% and that of Kievmarker City by 1.5%. Outside the capital, the central, southern and eastern regions experienced a severe decline in population. Between 1989 and 2001, the Dontesk region lost 470,681 people or 8.9% of its population, and neighbouring Luhansk region lost 10.9% of its population. Cherkasy region, in central Ukraine south of Kiev, lost 10.8%, while Odessa regionmarker lost 155,245 people, or 5.9% of its 1989 population. By 2001, Crimea's population declined by 396,795 people, representing 16.33% of the 1989 population, despite the return of displaced groups such as Crimean Tatars. Collectively, the net population loss in those parts of Ukraine that had belonged to the USSR prior to 1939 was 3,075,083 people or 6% of the 1989 population. The total population of these regions in 2001 was 38,483,220.

Thus, from 1989 until 2001 the pattern of population change was one of modest growth in Kiev, slight declines in western Ukraine, significant declines in eastern, central and southern Ukraine and a catastrophic decline in Crimea.

Regional differences in birth rates may account for some of the demographic differences. In the third quarter of 2007, for instance, the highest birth rate among Ukrainian regions occurred in Volyn Oblast, with a birth rate of 13.4/1,000 people, compared to the Ukrainian country-wide average of 9.6/1,000 people, which is the lowest in Europe. Volyn's birthrate is higher than the birth rate in any European country with the exceptions of Iceland and Albania. In 2007, for the first time since 1990, five Ukrainian regions (Zakarpattia Oblast, Rivne Oblast,Volyn Oblast, Lviv Oblastmarker, and Kiev Oblastmarker) experienced more births than deaths. This demonstrates a positive trend of increasing birthrates in the last couple of years throughout Ukraine. The ratio of births to deaths in those regions in 2007 was 119%, 117%, 110%, 100.7%, and 108%, respectively. With the exception of Kiev region, all of the regions with more births than deaths were in western Ukraine.

Migration

Ukraine is the major source of migrants in many of the European Union Member States. During the 1990s and early 2000s, Ukraine's sputtering economy and political instability contributed to rising emigration, especially to nearby Polandmarker and Hungarymarker, but also to other States such as Italymarker, Portugalmarker, Spainmarker, Turkeymarker, Israelmarker, Russiamarker and Canadamarker. Although estimates vary, approximately two to three million Ukrainian citizens are currently working abroad, most of them illegally, in construction, service, housekeeping, and agriculture industries.

Between 1991 and 2004, the government counted 2,537,400 individuals who emigrated; 1,897,500 moved to other post-Soviet states, and 639,900 moved to other, mainly Western, states.

By the early 2000s, Ukrainian embassies reported that 300,000 Ukrainian citizens were working in Poland, 200,000 in Italy, approximately 200,000 in the Czech Republicmarker, 150,000 in Portugal, 100,000 in Spain, 35,000 in Turkey, 20,000 in the United Statesmarker and small significant numbers in Austriamarker, Belgiummarker, Francemarker, Germanymarker, Greecemarker, Swedenmarker, Switzerlandmarker and the UKmarker. The largest number of Ukrainian workers abroad, about one million, are in the Russian Federation. Since 1992, 232,072 persons born in Ukraine have emigrated to the US.

From the point of view of the economic impact on natives, more appropriate than the absolute numbers is the volume of immigration as a proportion of the native population. Portugal and the Czech Republic have the highest rate of Ukrainian emigrants as a proportion of the native population.

Ethnic Groups

The below table gives the total population of various ethnic groups in Ukraine, according to the 2000 census and the language ability.

Group Pop Native Ukrainian Russian Other
Ukrainians 37541693 31970728 x 5544729 532
Russians 8334141 7993832 328152 x 402
Belarusians 275763 54573 48202 172251 x
Moldavians 258619 181124 27775 45607 22
Crimean Tatars 248193 228373 184 15208 43
Bulgarians 204574 131237 10277 62067 9
Hungarians 156566 149431 5367 1513 14
Romanians 150989 138522 9367 2297 4
Poles 144130 18660 102268 22495 390
Jews 103591 3213 13924 85964 16
Armenians 99894 50363 5798 43105 11
Greeks 91548 5829 4359 80992 9
Tatars 73304 25770 3310 43060 6
Roma (Gypsies) 47587 21266 10039 6378 6
Azerbaijanis 45176 23958 3224 16968 36
Georgians 34199 12539 2818 18589 15
Germans 33302 4056 7360 21549 20
Gagauzs 31923 22822 1102 7232 2
Koreans 12711 2223 700 9662 0
Uzbeks 12353 3604 1818 5996 0
Chuvashs 10593 2268 564 7636 1
Mordvinians 9331 1473 646 7168 0
Turks 8844 7923 133 567 0
Lithuanians 7207 1932 1029 4182 4
Arabs 6575 4071 897 1235 0
Slovaks 6397 2633 2665 335 0
Czechs 5917 1190 2503 2144 2
Kazakhs 5526 1041 822 3470 11
Latvians 5079 957 872 3188 1
Ossets 4834 1150 401 3110 4
Udmurts 4712 729 380 3515 0
Lezghians 4349 1507 330 2341 4
Tadjiks 4255 1521 488 1983 0
Bashkirs 4253 843 336 2920 0
Maris 4130 1059 264 2758 7
Vietnamese 3850 3641 29 164 0
Turkmen 3709 719 1079 1392 0
Albanians 3308 1740 301 1181 0
Assyrians 3143 883 408 1730 0
Chechens 2877 1581 212 977 0
Estonians 2868 416 321 2107 4
Chinese 2213 1817 73 307 0
Kurds 2088 1173 236 396 0
Darghins 1610 409 199 955 0
Komis 1545 330 127 1046 0
Karelians 1522 96 145 1244 1
Avars 1496 582 121 761 0
Indo-Pakistanis 1483 1092 26 192 0
Abkhazians 1458 317 268 797 0
Karaites 1196 72 160 931 0
Komi-Permians 1165 160 79 898 1
Kirghiz 1128 208 221 617 19
Laks 1019 199 271 514 13
Afghans 1008 551 60 213 0
Tabasarans 977 482 114 356 0
Spaniards 965 146 412 379 1
Orocks 959 12 179 710 50
Izhors 812 2 1 62 0
Finns 768 73 89 558 0
Kumyks 718 244 111 350 0
US (Americans) 709 556 34 88 0
Serbs 623 219 104 218 0
Udins 592 342 9 188 1
Nivkhs 584 4 76 352 0
Kabardinians 473 89 57 319 0
Ingushes 455 164 33 240 0
Italians 420 91 110 199 0
Persians 419 251 16 110 0
Crimchaki 406 68 41 263 6
Buriats 391 41 35 312 0
Nogays 385 227 12 130 1
Adygeis 338 67 19 242 0
Turks-Meskhetians 336 272 2 35 0
Kalmyks 325 17 130 170 0
Yakuts 304 56 47 198 0
Orochis 288 5 52 174 2
Vepses 281 11 186 63 0
Cubans 262 139 30 87 0
French 258 105 52 93 0
Livs 235 46 23 43 0
Chuvans 226 36 16 160 0
Nants 217 6 32 175 2
Balkars 206 40 36 115 0
Circassians 199 25 20 136 0
Uigurs 197 23 18 127 0
Karachais 190 35 22 113 0
Swedes 188 32 122 28 0
Mountain-Jews 166 23 12 121 0
Khakases 162 17 21 120 0
Innuit (Eskimos) 153 6 9 86 1
Dutch 139 32 36 64 0
Ruthulians 137 36 12 80 0
Lapps 136 3 20 95 0
Dungans 133 4 74 49 0
Talishes 133 28 19 78 0
Abazins 128 24 4 86 0
Croatians 126 23 27 38 0
Kara-Kalpaks 117 40 12 50 0
Austrians 112 16 28 54 0
English 112 50 16 37 0
Aguls 108 20 28 53 0
Georgian-Jews 108 1 70 29 0
Evens 104 19 6 7 0
Khalhas 104 56 2 40 0
Khanties 100 6 29 55 0
Cakhuries 83 16 16 31 0
Altaians 81 6 9 62 0
Ulchis 76 5 8 43 1
Koryaks 69 5 5 55 0
Tats 64 9 0 46 0
Selkups 62 1 6 49 0
Negidals 52 31 0 11 0
Canadians 51 21 9 15 1
Evenks 48 4 3 35 0
Nganasans 44 3 0 26 0
Japanese 44 21 4 18 0
Mansis 43 5 9 26 0
Tuvinian 43 4 2 24 0
Nanais 42 4 3 33 0
Udygeis 42 8 6 19 0
Kets 37 2 7 22 0
Shors 33 3 1 28 0
Baluchi 31 16 6 7 0
Chukchi 30 3 2 24 0
Dolgans 26 4 2 10 0
Ents 26 18 0 6 0
Itelmens 18 1 4 6 0
Tofalars 18 0 5 11 0
Jews-Central Asian 13 0 0 12 0
Chileans 13 2 5 4 0
Yucagiris 12 2 0 6 0
Aleutians 6 0 1 4 0
other 3228 1027 144 790 0
NA 188639 0 1108 1844 1


See also



References

  1. Population census of Ukraine, 2001
  2. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine Retrieved on 09-09-18
  3. Demoscope Retrieved on 09-09-18
  4. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine Retrieved on 01-07-09
  5. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine - Total population Retrieved on March 26, 2009
  6. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine - Natural population growth for 2008 Retrieved on March 26, 2009
  7. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine - Migration Retrieved on March 26, 2009
  8. UNAIDS Eastern Europe 2008 report Retrieved on September 6, 2008
  9. US Department of State, International Religious Freedom Report 2006
  10. Ukraine: A Concise Encyclopedia Vol. 1, Book by Volodymyr Kubiyovych; University of Toronto Press, 1963
  11. Posted availability of the book
  12. Рождаемость в Украине самая низкая в Европе, Demoscope.ru, April 16–29, 2007
  13. MIGnews: Volyn Region – Fertility Leader in Ukraine, 10 Oct 2007. Retrieved 19 Oct 2007.
  14. CIA world factbook.
  15. Ukrainian News: Birth Rate Exceeds Death Rate in Five Regions of Ukraine First Since 1990s 4th Oct 2007. Retrieved 19 Oct 2007.
  16. By Olena Malynovska, National Institute for International Security Problems, Kyiv Caught Between East and West, Ukraine Struggles with Its Migration Policy
  17. Population census 2001: Population by nationality


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