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Derry is a town in Rockingham Countymarker, New Hampshiremarker, United Statesmarker. The population was 34,021 at the 2000 census. Although it is a town and not a city, Derry is the fourth most-populous community in New Hampshiremarker.

The primary settlement in town, where over 66% of the population resides, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Derry census-designated place (CDP) and includes the densely-populated portions of the town centered on the intersection of New Hampshire Route 28 and New Hampshire Route 102.

History

Although it was first settled by Scottish-Irish (also known as Ulster-Scots) families in 1719, Derry was not incorporated until 1827. It was for a long time part of Londonderrymarker, which included Windhammarker and portions of Manchestermarker, Salemmarker and Hudsonmarker. The town was named for the city of Derrymarker, Northern Irelandmarker, the Irish word "Doire" meaning "oak woods." The first potato planted in the United Statesmarker was planted here in 1719. The town is the location of two of America's oldest private schools, Pinkerton Academymarker, founded in 1814 and still in operation, and the closed Adams Female Seminary.

Derry was once a linen and leather-making center until New Englandmarker textile industries moved south in the 20th century. As recently as World War II, Derry was also a sleepy farming community. The post-war suburban boom, the town's proximity to Bostonmarker in the south and Manchestermarker to the northwest, and the construction of Interstate 93 through town led to a huge population boom. Although this growth has slowed somewhat, the population of Derry still increased by 15 percent during the 1990s.

Antique postcards

Image:Thornton Square, Derry Village, NH.jpg|Thornton Square c. 1915Image:Baptist Church, West Derry, NH.jpg|Birch Street c. 1905Image:HEH Shoe Factory, West Derry, NH.jpg|HEH Shoe Factory in 1909

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of , of which is land and is water, comprising 2.40% of the town. Derry is drained by Beaver Brookmarker. The highest point in the town is Warner Hill, at above sea level, where from the top one can see the Boston skyline on a clear day. Derry lies almost fully within the Merrimack River watershed, with a small section along the northern border of town lying in the Piscataqua River watershed.

The urban part of the town, defined as a census-designated place (CDP), covers an area of , about 42.8% of the area of the town. of the CDP is land, and of it is water, about 1.60% of the total area of the CDP.

Derry is crossed by Interstate 93, New Hampshire Route 28, and New Hampshire Route 102.

Neighboring cities and towns

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 34,021 people, 12,327 households, and 8,789 families residing in the town. The population density was 950.7 people per square mile (367.0/km²). There were 12,735 housing units at an average density of 137.4 persons/km² (355.9 persons/sq mi). The racial makeup of the town was 96.05% White, 0.90% African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.06% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. 1.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 12,327 households out of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 10.6% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 28.7% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the town the population was spread out with 30.1% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 35.5% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 6.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $54,634, and the median income for a family was $61,625. Males had a median income of $41,271 versus $30,108 for females. The per capita income for the town was $22,315. 4.6% of the population and 3.3% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 5.0% are under the age of 18 and 7.1% are 65 or older.

Town center

As of the census of 2000, there were 22,661 people, 8,670 households, and 5,739 families residing in the CDP (census-designated place), the urban center of Derry. The population density was 1,469.3 people per square mile (567.4/km²). There were 8,942 housing units at an average density of 223.9 persons/km² (579.8 persons/sq mi). The racial makeup of the town was 95.58% White, 1.05% African American, 0.22% Native American, 1.12% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.75% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. 2.21% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 8,670 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 12.0% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 33.8% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 29.0% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 35.9% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.

The median income for a household is $49,792, and the median income for a family was $56,332. Males had a median income of $40,185 versus $28,580 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,938. 6.0% of the population and 4.3% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 6.9% are under the age of 18 and 7.6% are 65 or older.

Education

Pinkerton Academy

Public schools







Private schools



Media

Derry has three media sources, the weekly Derry News, which is owned by The Eagle-Tribune, the weekly Nutfield News, which is locally owned by Nutfield Publishing, and WZMY-TVmarker. Derry is located within the Bostonmarker broadcast media market.

Notable inhabitants

Tshieneto Boat Club c.
1910


Sites of interest



References



Further reading



External links




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