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The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburghmarker, Scotlandmarker. There have been three creations since 1726 (or four if one considers the royal dukedom of Gloucester and Edinburgh). The current holder is Prince Philip, the husband of and royal consort to Queen Elizabeth II.

History of title

The dukedom was first created on July 26, 1726, in the Peerage of Great Britain. The title was bestowed by King George I on his grandson Prince Frederick Lewis, who also became Prince of Wales the following year. Upon Frederick's death, the title was inherited by his son Prince George. When Prince George became King George III, the dukedom "merged into the crown," and ceased to exist.

King George III revived the title on November 19, 1764 for his younger brother, Prince William of Wales, the full form of the title being "Gloucestermarker and Edinburgh". The title passed to the Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh's only son, William Frederick, who died without a male heir, causing the title to become extinct.

Queen Victoria created the title on 24 May 1866 for her second son Prince Alfred, this time in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Alfred died without a male heir in 1900.

The title was next created by George VI in 1947 for his future son-in-law Lt. Philip Mountbatten. Philip married Princess Elizabeth the following day, and became a Prince of the United Kingdom in 1957. After her marriage but before her accession, Elizabeth was known as the Duchess of Edinburgh.

Future Dukes

It was announced in 1999, at the time of the wedding of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, that he would eventually follow his father as Duke of Edinburgh.[23622] However, the process by which this might happen is not simple, and will almost certainly not involve Edward directly inheriting the title from his father. Like any normal dukedom, the present Dukedom of Edinburgh passes to the heirs-male of the first duke, and Edward is currently fifth in this line of succession, following his two older brothers and his two nephews.

Rather, when the present duke dies, the dukedom will be inherited by his eldest son, Charles, Prince of Wales (or his heir, if he is deceased). If Charles is not yet king when this occurs, he would add "Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich" to his own list of titles. Only after Charles (or his heir) has both inherited the title of Duke of Edinburgh and ascended the throne would the present creation merge in the crown.

Presuming that there is no intention to call a new creation of the Dukedom into being while the current remains living, then, Edward will not become Duke of Edinburgh until after the death of both his parents. At that time the monarch of the day (although in no way legally bound to do so) will presumably carry out the announced scheme.

Dukes of Edinburgh, first Creation (1726)

subsidiary titles: Marquess of the Isle of Ely; Earl of Eltham; Viscount of Launceston; Baron of Snaudon

Dukes of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1764)

subsidiary title: Earl of Connaught (in the Peerage of Ireland)

Dukes of Edinburgh, second Creation (1866)

subsidiary titles: Earl of Kent; Earl of Ulster

Dukes of Edinburgh, third Creation (1947)

subsidiary titles: Earl of Merioneth, Baron Greenwich

Line of succession to the Edinburgh dukedom

It was announced at the time of the marriage of HRH The Earl of Wessex that he would inherit the Dukedom of Edinburgh. However the line of succession according to succession in the Peerages of the United Kingdom would be:-



Dukes of Edinburgh, in fiction

Prince Edmund (1461–1498) in the BBC historical comedy television series The Black Adder. Rowan Atkinson played the fictional Prince Edmund Plantagenet, Duke of Edinburgh, Laird of Roxburgh, Selkirk and Peebles, Lord Warden of the Royal Privies, Archbishop of Canterbury, who was the illegitimate son of Donald MacAngus, third duke of Argyll and Queen Gertrude of Flanders. Prince Edmund was therefore the stepson of King Richard IV (a fictionalised version of Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York).

In Tom Clancy's novel Patriot games Duke of Edinburgh is mentioned.

See also



External links




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