The Full Wiki

More info on England v Scotland (1870)

England v Scotland (1870): Map

Advertisements
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



Two football games between teams representing Englandmarker and Scotlandmarker took place in March and November 1870. These were the first international representative matches in any code of football and were organised under the auspices of the Football Association, but they are not currently recognised as official international games by FIFAmarker. The first of these matches/timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/991601.cms> took place on 5 March 1870 at The Ovalmarker, Londonmarker. The second game took place on 19 November.

Background

The 1870 match was initiated by CW Alcock who placed advertisements in Scottish newspapers, including the following letter in the Glasgow Herald on 3 November 1870 regarding the forthcoming match stated:

"FOOTBALL. ENGLAND V SCOTLAND. Sir, will you allow me a few lines in your newspaper to notify to Scotch players that a match under the above title will take place in London on Sat 10th inst., according to the rules of the Football Association. It is the object of the committee to select the best elevens at their disposal in the two countries, and I cannot but think that the appearance of some of the more prominent celebrities of football on the northern side of the Tweed would do much to disseminate a healthy feeling of good fellowship among the contestants and tend to promote a still greater extent the extension of the game..."

There was little evidence of any response to the gauntlet he had thrown down. As a result most of the Scottish players in these games were Londonmarker-based (see Controversy, below). The most notable exception was Robert Smith who was representing Glasgow's Queen's Park.

At the time of the games, the Football Association was the only existing national Football organisation in the world. The Scottish counterpart, the Scottish Football Association, was formed in 1873. As a result, the match was arranged entirely under the auspices of the FA.

The match on 5 March 1870

The game was organised by the FA resulted in a 1–1 draw.

The match was delayed two weeks from its advertised date due to excessive frost which had made the ground "dangerously unfit for play"

This is described in "The Sporting Gazette" of Saturday 12 March 1870 as follows:

"FOOTBALL. England v Scotland.By far the most important match of the season, both in respect of its representative character and the individual skill of the players engaged therein took place on Saturday on Kennington Oval, in the presence of a large number of spectators. England was represented by a picked team, and captained by Mr C.W. Alcock, than whom a better exponent of the game does not exist. Although on this occasion he appeared under the flag of the Old Harrovians, he is, we dare say, better known on both sides of the Tweed in Connexion with what may be termed the "M.C.C." of Football, the Wanderers Club. The Scottish team, lacking the valuable assistance of Lord Kilmarnock and Mr R.N. Ferguson, was under the command of Mr J Kirkpatrick, of the Civil Service. On the side of the Thistle were the son of the Premier, Mr W.H. Gladstone, M.P. and Mr J. W. Malcolm M.P. Upon somewhat slippery turf the English captain, having lost the toss, kicked off, in the teeth of a strong wind, about a quarter past three o'clock. Although the opening was vigorous on the part of the English, their opponents were "all there", and after the first five minutes the advantage, if any, was theirs. By the time the allotted three quarters of an hour had expired, involving, according to the new rule, a change of ends, neither side had scored, but may be fairly said the fortunes of the day were inclining towards the South. With the wind in their favour (when ends were changed at four o'clock) the English went to work manfully, and but for the excellent defence of Messrs W.H. Gladstone and A Morten (the latter of whom proved a most efficient goal-keeper,) Messrs Alcock, Baker Crake and Vidal would speedily have won a goal by a coup de main. A quarter of an hour before the time fixed for concluding the game, the English captain, over-confident, withdrew a goal-keeper, and Scotland gained a goal by a long and rather lucky kick on the part of Mr R.E. Crawford. The result was hailed with tremendous cheers, the partisans of the Scotch being apparently almost overpowered with joy. There was again a change of ends, and the spectators were treated to some splendid efforts on the part of the English to make the contest a tie. If the former kick was "almost a fluke", the brilliant run on the part of A. Baker, who, just before time was called, saved England from the odium of defeat was one of the finest exploits on a match that was throughout distinguished by skill, determination, and "dash" on the part of both teams. On the side of Scotland, Mr W.H. Gladstone shone out conspicuously among his brethren, his kicking and back-play generally showing no lack of the skill for which he was so distinguished at Eton; and Crawford, Hamilton and Lindsay were also worthy of the highest commendation. For England, Messrs C W Alcock and A Baker may be mentioned for the speed, as well as the energy, of their play; while Messrs E. Freeth and E. Lubbock were also very effective as backs. The sides were:

England: C.W. Alcock (Old Harrovians,) captain, E.E. Bowen (Wanderers), A. Baker (N.N.'s), W.C. Butler (Barnes Club,) W.P. Crake (Harrow School,) E. Freeth (Civil Service,) E Lubbock (Old Etonian,) A Nash (Clapham Rovers,) J.C. Smith (Crusaders,) A.H. Thornton (Old Harrovian) and R.W. Vidal (Westminster School)

Scotland: J. Kirkpatrick (Civil Service,) captain, R.E. Crawford (Harrow School,) W.H. Gladstone, M.P. (Old Etonian), G.C. Gordon (N.N.'s) C.R.B Hamilton (Civil Service,) W.A.B. Hamilton (Old Harrovian,) A.F. Kinnaird (Crusaders) W.Lindsay (Old Wykehamist,) J.W. Malcolm, M.P. (London Scottish Rifles) A. Morten (Crystal Palace Club) and K.Muir Mackenzie (Old Carthusian)

This match was described in the Glasgow Herald as "the great international football match"

The match on 19 November 1870

The match result was 1-0 to England.

According to Bell's Life of Saturday 26 November 1870 (issue 446), this match afforded "judges of the game [of soccer] a treat of unusual excellence for the many scientific points it evolved... was a tussle full of interest to the uninitiated, and ... was heartily enjoyed by a large crowd of on lookers" The match commenced at three o'clock and was described thus: "After the northerners had kept their opponents at bay for some time, Mr Alcock made a splendid run from the centre of the ground, and being cleverly supported by Mr Walker, a goal was obtained - the successful kick being made by the latter, and it was the only one made throughout the game. Ends being changed, Mr Baker made a good attempt to reach the Scotch goal, but failed in effecting a twist when within a few yards of it. The ball was soon after retained in the middle of the grounds, and the Scotch team pressing their opponents, the match became very exciting, the lines of Scotland being afterwards menaced by the energetic rushes of England, who were successfully repulsed by Messrs Nepean, Hogg, and Kinnaird, who played admirably as backs; for although Mr Hogg was slightly lame, he was formidable in opposition. Thus the game progressed, and most evenly; for while those named were most indefatigable in their endeavours to lower the English goal, Messrs Alcock, Vidal, Cockerell, Baker and Hooman, were equally so in trying successfully to send the ball through the Scotch lines. At one time Mr Kirkpatrick got the ball down to the English goal by a fine exhibition of dribbling and for a time England seemed in imminent danger of losing the only advantage that had been gained. To protecttheir goal the Englishmen rushed en masse on their opponents and after some more fine play succeeded in bringing the ball away to the other end of the field, where the captain of the English team in quick succession made two brilliant attempts to reduce the Scotch lines, the first failing on account account of the ball glancing outwards from one of the posts. Mr Hooman also got the ball in near the Scotch goal, and Mr Baker having brought it to bear at once drove it under the line, but it was disallowed. Mr Cockerell made some good runs" The account in Bell's also confirms the presence of R. Smith of Queen's Park FC (Glasgow)in the Scottish squad.

This match was also described by the Scotsman newspaper:

"The second of the international [The Scotsman's italics] between the champion players of England and Scotland ... took place on Saturday.. in the presence of an army of spectators so large as to leave hardly a vacant place in the line of ropes which bounded the ground...
At three o'clock precisely proceedings were commenced with a kick off by C.E.
Nepean on behalf of the Scottish team, the opposition have derived little advantage from the success in securing choice of positions.
No time was wasted, and the very outset was productive of no little excitement among the spectators as the English eleven whose organisation was faultless throughout the game, with a united rush drove the ball into the enemy's quarters and the first point of advantage fell to the English in carrying the fight behind the goal line of Scotland.
The kick off made matters still worse as only a few moments were allowed to elapse before, by a well executed run down by CW Alcock in conjunction with a final kick from the foot of R.S.F.
Walker enforced the surrender of the Scottish goal to the accompaniment of no little cheering from the English portion of the spectators.
According to custom the position of the two elevens were then reversed and everything seemed to augur another increase to the score achieved by England as the ball was once more driven into the ground...
any Scotch players who may be desirous of assisting their country on that day may communicate with Messrs A F Kinnaird"


The players in the November 1870 match were as follows:

England: CW Alcock (Harrow Pilgrims), A.J Baker (Wanderers), T.N. Cartes (captain of Eton College eleven), J. Cockerell (captain of Brixton Club), W.P. Crake (Barnes Club), T.O. Hooman (Wanderers), E. Lubbock (West Kent), W.B Paton (Captain of Harrow School), H.J. Preston (Eton college eleven), R.W.S Vidal (Westminster School) and R.S.F. Walker (Clapham Rovers).

Scotland: J. Kirkpatrick (Civil Service), A.F. Kinnaird (Wanderers) R.E.W. Crawford (Harrow School) C.E. Nepean (University College, Oxon), Q.Hogg (Wanderers), W.Lindsay (Rochester club)W. Bailey (Civil Service), G.F. Congreve (Old Rugbean), Robert Smith (Queen's Park club, Glasgow), G.G. Kennedy (Wanderers) and H.Primrose (Civil Service)

There was "every satisfaction" with the "no hands" rules of the FA The match was described in the Glasgow Herald as "THE FOOTBALL MATCH BETWEEN SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND (their capitals)"

Controversy

After these matches there was resentment in Scotland that their team did not contain more home grown players. Alcock himself was categorical about where he felt responsibility for this fact lay, writing in the Scotsman newspaper:

"I must join issue with your correspondent in some instances.
First, I assert that of whatever the Scotch eleven may have been composed the right to play was open to every Scotchman [Alcock's italics] whether his lines were cast North or South of the Tweed and that if in the face of the invitations publicly given through the columns of leading journals of Scotland the representative eleven consisted chiefly of Anglo-Scotians ... the fault lies on the heads of the players of the north, not on the management who sought the services of all alike impartially.
To call the team London Scotchmen contributes nothing.
The match was, as announced, to all intents and purposes between England and Scotland".


Alcock then proceeded to offer another challenge with a Scottish team drawn from Scotland and proposed the north of England as a venue. Alcock appeared to be particularly concerned about the number of players in Scottish football teams at the time, adding: "More than eleven we do not care to play as it is with greater numbers it is our opinion the game becomes less scientific and more a trial of charging and brute force... Charles W Alcock, Hon Sec of Football Association and Captain of English Eleven"..

One reason for the absence of a response to Alcock's challenge may have been different football codes being followed in Scotland at the time. A written reply to Alcock's letter above states: "Mr Alcock's challenge to meet a Scotch eleven on the borders sounds very well and is doubtless well meant. But it may not be generally well known that Mr Alcock is a very leading supporter of what is called the "association game"... devotees of the "association" rules will find no foemen worthy of their steel in Scotland". As late as 1872 it was noted that "Scottish players, with but few exceptions, follow the Rugby rules"

All of these early matches were, however, described as internationals in both The Scotsman and Glasgow Herald newspapers. Indeed the Glasgow Herald described the first match as "the great international football match"

Scottish supporters represented "no small portion of the spectators"

The following letter is typical of the invitations from Alcock published in Scottish newspapers to invite players from within Scotland: "FOOTBALL. ENGLAND V SCOTLAND. Sir, will you allow me a few lines in your newspaper to notify to Scotch players that a match under the above title will take place in London on Sat 10th inst., according to the rules of the Football Association. It is the object of the committee to select the best elevens at their disposal in the two countries, and I cannot but think that the appearance of some of the more prominent celebrities of football on the northern side of the Tweed would do much to disseminate a healthy feeling of good fellowship among the contestants and tend to promote a still greater extent the extension of the game..." Short notice was an early criticism of these invitations and Alcock was careful to provide more notice (more than five weeks) in subsequent games, for example the February 1871 match

Despite a current feeling in Scotland that they were not fully represented in these matches, the Glasgow Herald introduced its Feb 1871 match report with the following appraisal of the team:

"ENGLAND V SCOTLAND. The third of the international matches which have now been decided between the cream of the football players under the above nationalities took place under most favourable circumstances at the County of Surrey cricket ground in London on Saturday. Much interest has been attached to this contest for some time past as it was known that both captains had been successful in the composition of elevens capable of efficiently representing their respective causes and additional excitement was manifested from .... Scotland by the appearance on the present occasion of several skilled exponents of the game who were absent in the previous engagement..."

Subsequent international matches

This was the first of four such internationals organised by the FA to take place between the two nations over the next couple of years, for example England v Scotland and England v Scotland . Eventually, the FA decided in its minutes of 3 October 1872 note that:

The challenge was taken up by Queen's Park and this match, in 1872 is currently the earliest international football match recognised by FIFA as official. It was, however, still organised under the umbrella of one official football body, the FA.

It continued to be many years before whole football teams travelled abroad for international games: even in the 1873 England v Scotland game, the first official match in England, only 3 Scottish players were not from English sides

References

  1. http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/sportscotland/asportingnation/article/0012/index.shtml
  2. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Thursday, 3 November 1870; Issue 9623
  3. The Scotsman newspaper, 21 November 1870, page 7
  4. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415
  5. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415.
  6. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415.
  7. Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle, Saturday 26 November 1870, issue 446
  8. Bell's life in London and sporting chronicle, Saturday 26 November 1870, issue 446
  9. The Scotsman newspaper, 21 November 1870, page 7
  10. The Scotsman newspaper, 21 November 1870, page 7
  11. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 21 November 1870; Issue 9637.
  12. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Saturday, 19 November 1870; Issue 9636.
  13. Charles W Alcock, The Scotsman newspaper, 28 November 1870, page 7
  14. Charles W Alcock, The Scotsman newspaper, 28 November 1870, page 7
  15. H>M. The Scotsman newspaper, 1 December 1870, page 12
  16. The Graphic (London, England), Saturday, 24 February 1872; Issue 117.
  17. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415
  18. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415.
  19. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 7 March 1870; Issue 9415.
  20. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Thursday, 3 November 1870; Issue 9623
  21. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Saturday, 7 January 1871; Issue 9678
  22. Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, 27 February 1871; Issue 9721
  23. Harvey, Adrian in Football The First Hundred Years The Untold Story, Routledge


See also




Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message