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Felix Josef von Mottl (24 August 18562 July 1911) was an Austrianmarker conductor and composer.

Born in Unter Sankt Veit, today Viennamarker, Mottl was regarded as one of the most brilliant conductors of his day. He composed some operas, of which Agnes Bernauer (Weimarmarker, 1880) was the most successful, and numerous songs and other music. His orchestration of Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder is still the most commonly performed version. He was also a teacher, counting among his pupils Ernest van Dyck and Wilhelm Petersen.

Mottl had a successful career at the Vienna Conservatoire. He became known as a gifted conductor of Wagner's music, and assisted Hans Richter in the preparations for the first complete Ring Cycle at Bayreuth; in 1886 he directed the performance of Tristan und Isolde at the Bayreuth Festivalmarker. From 1881 to 1903 he was conductor at the Karlsruhemarker Opera, and made a wide reputation for his activity there, particularly in producing the works of Wagner, Hector Berlioz and Emmanuel Chabrier, whose operas he championed; Mottl also orchestrated Chabrier's Bourrée fantasque and Trois valses romantiques. In later years, as a conductor of Wagner especially, he visited Londonmarker and New Yorkmarker, where he was guest conductor for the Metropolitan Opera in 1903. In 1904 he was made a director of the Akademie der Künstemarker at Berlinmarker.

In June 1907 he cut some player piano rolls with Welte-Mignon, including his own piano transcription of the Prelude, the Love Duet and Brangäne's Warning from Tristan. He died in a Munichmarker hospital on July 2, 1911, after suffering a heart attack on June 21, while conducting his 100th performance of Tristan in Munich.

References

  • Frithjof Haas: Der Magier am Dirigentenpult. Felix Mottl. Karlsruhe: Hoepfner-Bibliothek. Info Verlag ,2006, ISBN 3881904247


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