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Association football, usually known simply as football or soccer, has been included in every Olympiad except 1896 and 1932 as a men's competition sport. Women's football was added to the official programme in 1996.

Early history

Football was not on the programme at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, as international football was in its infancy at the time. However, some sources claim that an unofficial football tournament was organised during the first competition, in which an Athensmarker XI lost to a team representing Smyrnamarker (Izmirmarker), then part of the Ottoman Empire. Smyrna went on to be beaten (15-0) by a team from Denmarkmarker. However, it is in fact unclear whether any competition took place at all; the Olympic historian Bill Mallon has written: "Supposedly a match between a Greek club and a Danish club took place. No such 1896 source supports this and we think this is an error which has been perpetuated in multiple texts. No such match occurred".

Tournaments were played at the 1900 and 1904 games and the Intercalated Games of 1906, but these were contested by various clubs and scratch teams, and although the IOCmarker considers the 1900 and 1904 tournaments to be official Olympic events, they are not recognized by FIFAmarker; neither recognizes the Intercalated Games today. In 1906 teams from Great Britain, Germanymarker, Austriamarker, the Netherlandsmarker and France were withdrawn from an unofficial competition and left Denmark, Smyrna (one Armenian, two Frenchmen and eight Britons), Athens and Thessaloniki Music Club to compete. Denmark won the final against Athens 9-0.

British successes

In the Londonmarker Games of 1908marker a proper international tournament was organised by the Football Association, featuring just six teams, rising to 11 in 1912 (at which event the competition was organised by the Swedish Football Association). These early matches were fairly unbalanced, as witnessed by some large scores; two players, Sophus Nielsen in 1908 and Gottfried Fuchs in 1912, each scored ten goals in a match, a record that stood for over 90 years. All players were amateurs, in accordance with the Olympic spirit, which meant that some countries could not send their full international team. The National Olympic Committee for Great Britain and Irelandmarker asked the Football Association to send an English national amateur team (some of whom played with professional clubs within England, most notably Derby County's Ivan Sharpe and Chelsea's Vivian Woodward), who managed to win the first two official tournaments convincingly, beating Denmark.

The 1920s and the rise of the Uruguayans

The competition became increasingly important throughout the 1920s, although that decade witnessed a bad day in the history of the Olympic movement when, during the 1920 final, Czechoslovakia walked from the field of play, in order to raise awareness of their displeasure regarding the refereeing of John Lewis and the militarised mood within the stadium in Antwerpmarker. In both the 1924 and 1928 editions of the competition, the Olympic movement was given an almighty fillip with the entrance of Uruguay and Argentina. The first of those teams were successful in both competitions (these were the only competitions that they have ever participated in) and FIFAmarker became conscious that the Olympic movement was not only hindering the ability of nations to participate on an equal footing but, given that the Olympics only permitted amateurs to participate, was not representing the true strength of the international game.

The Olympics after the first World Cup

With Henri Delaunay's proposal in 1929 to initiate a professional World Championship of football (hence the launch of the World Cup in Uruguaymarker in 1930), FIFAmarker did not want the Olympic tournament to overshadow their own showpiece event, so football was dropped from the 1932 Los Angeles Games (the official reason was that the game was not popular in the United Statesmarker), and it returned at the 1936 Berlin Games. The German organisers were intent on the return of the game to the Olympic movement since it guaranteed vital income into the organisation's coffers. In any event, it proved to be a considerable success, more so since the German national side was defeated by Norway in a second round match that was attended by Adolf Hitler. As professionalism spread around the world, the gap in quality between the two tournaments widened. The countries that benefited most were the Soviet Bloc countries of Eastern Europe, where the top athletes were state sponsored while retaining their status as amateurs. Between 1948 and 1980, 23 out of 27 Olympic medals were won by Eastern European countries, with only Sweden (gold in 1948 and bronze in 1952), Denmark (silver in 1960) and Japan (bronze in 1968) breaking their dominance.

Changes and developments

For the 1984 Los Angeles Games, the IOCmarker felt a change was necessary to bring interest back, and decided to admit professional players. FIFA still did not want the Olympics to rival the World Cup, so a compromise was struck that allowed teams from Africa, Asia, Oceania and CONCACAF to field their strongest professional sides, while only allowing UEFA and CONMEBOL teams to pick players who had not previously played in a World Cup. Many teams therefore fielded very young teams, including France, who won the 1984 Olympic title in between two semi-final appearances at World Cups.

The idea of youth teams found favour at both FIFA and the IOC, and since 1992 players of the mens competition must be under 23 years of age, with three over-23 players allowed per squad. The tournament is now effectively an "Under-23 World Cup", complementing FIFA's own tournaments at Under-20 and Under-17 levels. The new format allows teams from around the world to compete equally, and African and Asian countries have taken particular advantage of this, with Nigeria and Cameroon winning in 1996 and 2000 respectively.

Because of the unusual format, several of the historically strongest footballing countries have unimpressive Olympic records. The Netherlands won bronze in the first three tournaments, but has not reached the finals since 1952. Uruguay won the tournament in their first two attempts, in 1924 and 1928, but those are their only appearances. Argentina won silver twice before the 2004 Athens Games, but its appearance in Athens, in which it won the first gold medal (the second was won in Beijing in 2008), was only their sixth overall. Brazil's two silver medals in the 1980s is the best they have achieved, and the men's team failed to qualify in 1992 and 2004. Hungary won three gold medals, in 1952, 1964 and 1968, but has not returned to the finals since 1996. Italy has only won once the Olympic title, in 1936, with two bronzes and has the most number of appearances in the tournament (15) and it is the only team present in every edition from 1984.

British non-involvement

After 1974, when the Football Association of England abolished the distinction between "amateur" and "professional" football, Great Britain no longer entered a football team into the qualifying competitions of the Olympics.

The four parts of the United Kingdommarker, known as the 'Home Nations' - England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales - have separate international football teams within FIFAmarker, which includes a guaranteed position as Vice-Presidency on the FIFAmarker Management Committee and have a 50% presence on the International Football Association Board (which sits annually to debate changes within the Laws of the Game).

With Londonmarker now selected as the host for the 2012 Games there is considerable pressure within the English FA, British Olympic Committee and the British Government for the UK to field men's and women's teams at those games [72322]; an idea the Football Association of Wales [72323] and Scottish Football Association[72324] have strongly objected to out of fear it may lead to their separate status in FIFA competitions being called into question. The Irish Football Association, which covers Northern Ireland, is less strong in its view [72325].

A suggestion put forward by the English FA is for the four constituent parts of the UK to play a tournament with the winning team going on to represent the UK in the Olympics. [72326]

On Thursday, 24 July 2008, speaking about the proposal for a United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland football team at the 2012 London Olympics, the Scottish Football Association's Chief Executive, Gordon Smith said:

"The Scottish FA's position on this issue remains the same - we are opposed to the concept of a British football team. As we have said many times before, we feel that such a move would threaten the independent status of the Home Nations.

"Also, when we speak to our fan groups about this issue, they tell us that they are strongly opposed to the idea. As the governing body of football in this country, we will always do what is best for the sport here in Scotland.

"On a personal note, I feel that the Olympics should be the pinnacle of any sport and it is doubtful as to whether an age restricted football competition in the Olympics would ever be able to rival the World Cup."[72327]

The row amongst the four UK associations ended when they agreed on a compromise by which England would exclusively organise men's and women's teams, made up entirely of English players, to play as Great Britain teams. On 29 May 2009, the four associations sent a joint letter to FIFA stating that while the Scottish, Welsh, and Northern Ireland associations would not participate in any joint UK team, they would not prevent England from using its own players to organise Great Britain teams for the 2012 Games.

Venues

Due to the great number of large stadia required for the Olympic tournament, venues in distant cities - often more than 200 km (120 miles) away from the main host city - are typically used for the football tournament, especially in the early rounds. In an extreme example, two early-round venues for the 1984 Games were on the U.S. East Coast, well over 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from the host city of Los Angelesmarker. The next Games held in the United States, the 1996 Games, were unique in that no matches were held in the host city of Atlantamarker; the nearest venue and the site of all finals was about 65 miles (105 km) away on the University of Georgiamarker campus in Athensmarker.

Here is a list of all the venues used in the Olympic football tournaments

Edition of the Olympic Games City Stadium
Paris 1900 Parismarker Vélodrome de Vincennesmarker
Saint Louis 1904 St. Louis, Missourimarker Francis Fieldmarker
London 1908marker Londonmarker White City Stadiummarker
Stockholm 1912 Stockholmmarker Stockholms Olympiastadionmarker
Råsunda Stadiummarker
Tranebergs Idrottsplats
Antwerp 1920 Antwerpmarker Olympisch Stadionmarker
Royal Antwerp Football Club Stadium
Brusselsmarker Stade de l’Union St. Gilloisemarker
Ghentmarker Stade d’A.A.marker La Gantoisemarker
Paris 1924 Parismarker Stade Olympiquemarker, Colombes
Stade Bergeyremarker
Stade de Parismarker, Saint-Ouen
Stade Pershingmarker, Vincennes
Amsterdam 1928 Amsterdammarker Olympisch Stadionmarker
Rotterdammarker Het Kasteelmarker
De Kuipmarker
Arnhemmarker Monnikenhuize
Los Angeles 1932 No football tournament
Berlin 1936 Berlinmarker Olympiastadionmarker
Poststadionmarker, Tiergartenmarker
Mommsenstadionmarker, Charlottenburgmarker
Hertha-BSC-Platz
London 1948 Londonmarker Empire Stadium, Wembleymarker
White Hart Lanemarker, Tottenhammarker
Selhurst Parkmarker, Crystal Palacemarker
Craven Cottagemarker, Fulhammarker
Griffin Parkmarker, Brentfordmarker
Arsenal Stadiummarker, Highburymarker
Cricklefield Stadium, Ilfordmarker
Green Pond Road Stadiummarker, Walthamstowmarker
Champion Hillmarker, Dulwichmarker
Brightonmarker Goldstone Groundmarker
Portsmouthmarker Fratton Parkmarker
Helsinki 1952 Helsinkimarker Olympiastadionmarker
Football Grounds
Turkumarker Kupittaa Stadiummarker
Tamperemarker Ratina Stadionmarker
Lahtimarker Kisapuistomarker
Kotkamarker Kotka Stadionmarker
Melbourne 1956 Melbournemarker Melbourne Cricket Groundmarker
Football and Athletics Ground, Olympic Parkmarker
Rome 1960 Romemarker Stadio Flaminiomarker
Florencemarker Stadio Comunale
Grossetomarker Stadio Comunalemarker
Livornomarker Stadio Ardenzamarker
Pescaramarker Stadio Adriaticomarker
L'Aquilamarker Stadio Comunalemarker
Naplesmarker Stadio Fuorigrottamarker
Tokyo 1964 Tokyomarker National Olympic Stadiummarker
Prince Chichibu Memorial Fieldmarker
Komazawa Stadiummarker
Saitama, Saitama Omiya Football Stadiummarker
Yokohama Mitsuzawa Stadiummarker
Mexico City 1968 Mexico Citymarker Estadio Aztecamarker
Pueblamarker Estadio Cuauhtémocmarker
Guadalajaramarker Estadio Jaliscomarker
Leónmarker Estadio Leónmarker
Munich 1972 Munichmarker Olympiastadionmarker
Augsburgmarker Rosenaustadionmarker
Ingolstadtmarker ESV-Stadionmarker
Regensburgmarker Jahnstadionmarker
Nurembergmarker Frankenstadionmarker
Passaumarker Drei Flüsse Stadion
Montreal 1976 Montrealmarker Olympic Stadiummarker
Sherbrookemarker Municipal Stadium
Torontomarker Varsity Stadiummarker
Ottawamarker Lansdowne Stadiummarker
Moscow 1980 Moscowmarker Lenin Stadiummarker
Dynamo Stadiummarker
Leningradmarker Kirov Stadiummarker
Kievmarker Republican Stadiummarker
Minskmarker Dinamo Stadiummarker
Los Angeles 1984 Pasadena, Californiamarker Rose Bowlmarker
Boston, Massachusettsmarker Harvard Stadiummarker
Annapolis, Marylandmarker Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadiummarker
Stanford, Californiamarker Stanford Stadiummarker
Seoul 1988 Seoulmarker Jamsil Olympic Stadiummarker
Dongdaemun Stadiummarker
Daegumarker Daegu Stadiummarker
Busanmarker Busan Stadiummarker
Gwangjumarker Gwangju Stadiummarker
Daejeonmarker Daejeon Stadiummarker
Barcelona 1992 Barcelonamarker Camp Noumarker
Estadio Sarriámarker
Sabadellmarker Estadi de la Nova Creu Altamarker
Zaragozamarker Estadio La Romaredamarker
Valenciamarker Estadio Luis Casanovamarker
Atlanta 1996 Athens, Georgiamarker Sanford Stadiummarker
Orlando, Floridamarker Citrus Bowlmarker
Birmingham, Alabamamarker Legion Fieldmarker
Miami, Floridamarker Miami Orange Bowlmarker
Washington, D.C.marker Robert F.marker Kennedy Memorial Stadiummarker
Sydney 2000 Sydneymarker Olympic Stadiummarker
Sydney Football Stadiummarker
Brisbanemarker Brisbane Cricket Groundmarker
Adelaidemarker Hindmarsh Stadiummarker
Canberramarker Bruce Stadiummarker
Melbournemarker Melbourne Cricket Groundmarker
Athens 2004 Athensmarker Athens Olympic Stadiummarker
Karaiskaki Stadiummarker
Patrasmarker Pampeloponnisiako Stadiummarker
Volosmarker Panthessaliko Stadiummarker
Thessalonikimarker Kaftanzoglio Stadiummarker
Iraklionmarker Pankritio Stadiummarker
Beijing 2008 Beijing Beijing National Stadiummarker
Workers' Stadiummarker
Tianjinmarker Tianjin Olympic Center Stadiummarker
Shanghai Shanghai Stadiummarker
Qinhuangdaomarker Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Centre Stadiummarker
Shenyangmarker Shenyang Olympic Sports Centre Stadiummarker
London 2012 Londonmarker Wembley Stadiummarker
Glasgowmarker Hampden Parkmarker
Cardiffmarker Millennium Stadiummarker
Manchestermarker Old Traffordmarker
Newcastle upon Tynemarker St James' Parkmarker
Rio de Janeiro 2016 Rio de Janeiromarker Maracanãmarker
São Paulomarker Morumbimarker
Brasíliamarker Estádio Nacional de Brasíliamarker
Salvador Fonte Novamarker
Belo Horizontemarker Mineirãomarker


Events

Event 96 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 Years
Men's event X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 24
Women's event X X X X 4


Participating nations

Men

(Note: Where applicable, numbers refer to the number of teams from each country)
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 Years
- - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - Y - - - - Y Y - - - - - Y - Y - Y Y 7
- - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y 7
- - - Y - - - Y Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4
Y - - - Y Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y 5
- - - - - - - - - Y - Y Y Y Y Y - Y Y - Y Y - Y 11
- - - - - Y - - - Y Y Y - Y - - - - - - - - - - 5
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - Y - Y 3
- Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - - - - - 3
- - - - - - Y - - Y - - - - - - - Y - - - Y - - 4
- - - - - - - Y Y - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - Y 4
- - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y Y - Y - - Y - - - - 4
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y Y - - - - Y - 3
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y Y - - - - - - - 2
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - 1
- - - - Y Y - - - - - - Y Y - - Y - - - - - - - 5
- - Y Y Y - - - Y Y - Y - - Y - - - - Y - - - - 8
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y Y Y - - - - - - - 4
- - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y - Y Y - - - - Y - Y - - - - 10
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - Y - - - Y - Y - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - 4
Y - 2 - Y Y - - Y Y - Y - Y - Y - Y - - Y - - - 11
- - - Y - - Y Y - Y Y - - - Y - - Y Y - - - - - 8
- - - - - - - - - - - - Y Y Y - - - - Y Y - Y - 6
Y - Y Y Y - - Y Y Y Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - 9
- - - - Y - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - 3
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - Y - - - - - 3
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y 2
- - - - Y Y Y - Y Y - - Y Y Y Y - - - - Y - - - 10
- - - - - - - - Y Y Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - 4
- - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y Y - - - - - - - - 3
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y Y Y - - - Y - 4
- - - - - Y - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - - - - - - - 2
- - - Y Y Y Y Y Y Y - Y - - - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 15
- - - - - - - Y - - Y - Y Y - - - - - - Y Y Y Y 8
- - - - - - - - Y - - - Y - - - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y 8
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - Y - Y - - 3
- - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - 1
- - - - - - - - Y - - - Y Y Y Y - - - Y Y - Y - 8
- - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - Y - Y - Y Y - 6
- - Y Y Y Y Y - Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y 8
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y 1
- - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - Y - Y - Y Y - Y 6
- - - Y Y - - Y - Y - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - 5
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - Y - 2
- - - - - - - Y - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - 2
- - - - - Y - Y - Y - Y - - Y Y - - - Y - - - - 7
- - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - 3
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - - - 2
- - - - - Y - - - Y - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - 3
- - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - Y - - - 2
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - 1
- - - - - - - - - Y Y - - - Y Y Y - Y - - - - - 6
- - - - Y Y Y - - - - - - Y - Y Y - - Y Y Y - - 9
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - 1
- - Y Y Y Y - Y Y Y - - - - - - - - Y Y - - - - 9
- - - - - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - 1
- - - - - - - - - - Y - - Y - - - - - - - - - - 2
- - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - Y - Y - Y - 4
- - - - - Y - Y Y Y - Y - - - - - - - - - - - - 5
- 2 - - - Y Y Y Y Y Y - - - Y - - Y Y Y Y Y - Y 14
- - - - - Y Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - - - - - - - 1
- - - - Y Y - - Y Y Y Y Y - - - Y Y Y - - - - - 10
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Y - Y - - - - - 2
Total nations 3 2 5 11 14 22 17 16 18 25 11 16 14 16 16 13 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16


Women

Numbers refer to the final placing of each team at the respective Games.
Nation 96 00 04 08 Years
=11 1
7 5 2
4 4 2 2 4
8 1
2 5 9 5 4
8 1
5 3 3 3 4
10 1
7 7 4 3
8 1
10 1
8 6 =11 3
9 1
3 1 7 3
6 6 4 6 4
1 2 1 1 4
Total nations 8 8 10 12


Men's tournament

The qualifying tournament, like that for the World Cup, is organised along continental lines. Most continental confederations organise a special Under-23 qualifying tournament, although the European qualifiers are drawn from the finalists of the UEFA Under-21 Championship (in practice, an U-23 event). For the 2008 Beijing Games, the number of places allocated to each continent was:



Women's tournament

The women's tournament is contested between full national sides, with no age restrictions. The teams are chosen from the best of the previous year's World Cup, with one spot reserved for the host country.

The first women's tournament was at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The US won the gold medal, and picked up silver in 2000 after an extra time defeat by . The finals of the next two tournaments, in 2004 and 2008, also went to extra time, with the USA defeating both times.

Allocation of places for each continent in the 2008 Games was:



Records

Men's medal table

1 3 1 1 5
2 3 0 0 3
3 2 2 0 4
4 2 0 3 5
5 2 0 0 2
6 1 3 1 5
7 1 2 0 3
1 2 0 3
9 1 1 2 4
10 1 1 0 2
1 1 0 2
1 1 0 2
13 1 0 2 3
1 0 2 3
15 1 0 1 2
16 1 0 0 1
1 0 0 1
18 0 3 1 4
19 0 2 2 4
20 0 1 1 2
0 1 1 2
22 0 1 0 1
0 1 0 1
0 1 0 1
25 0 0 3 3
26 0 0 1 1
0 0 1 1
0 0 1 1
0 0 1 1
0 0 1 1


Men's results

Year Host Final Third Place Match
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th Place
1900
Details
Parismarker
Great Britain
only three teams entered
1904
Details
St. Louismarker only three teams entered
1908
Details
Londonmarker
Great Britain
2 - 0 2 - 0
1912
Details
Stockholmmarker
Great Britain
4 - 2 9 - 0
Finland
1920
Details
Antwerpmarker
1924
Details
Parismarker 3 - 0 1 - 1
aet
Match replay: 3 - 1
1928
Details
Amsterdammarker 1 - 1
aet
11 - 3
Match replay: 2 - 1
1932 Los Angelesmarker No football tournament
1936
Details
Berlinmarker 2 - 1
aet
3 - 2
1948
Details
Londonmarker 3 - 1 5 - 3
Great Britain
1952
Details
Helsinkimarker 2 - 0 2 - 0
1956
Details
Melbournemarker 1 - 0 3 - 0
1960
Details
Romemarker 3 - 1 2 - 1
1964
Details
Tokyomarker 2 - 1 3 - 1
1968
Details
Mexico Citymarker 4 - 1 2 - 0
1972
Details
Munichmarker 2 - 1 2 - 2
aet
1976
Details
Montrealmarker 3 - 1 2 - 0
1980
Details
Moscowmarker 1 - 0 2 - 0
1984
Details
Los Angelesmarker 2 - 0 2 - 1
1988
Details
Seoulmarker 2 - 1
aet
3 - 0
1992
Details
Barcelonamarker 3 - 2 1 - 0
1996
Details
Atlantamarker 3 - 2 5 - 0
2000
Details
Sydneymarker 2 - 2
asdet
2 - 0
5 - 3 on penalty shootout
2004
Details
Athensmarker 1 - 0 1 - 0
2008
Details
Beijing 1 - 0 3 - 0
2012
Details
Londonmarker




Men's top scorers by tournament

Year Player Goals
1900 Unknown
1904 Alexander Hall

Tom Taylor
3
1908 Sophus Nielsen 11
1912 Gottfried Fuchs 10
1920 Herbert Karlsson 7
1924 Pedro Petrone 8
1928 Domingo Tarasconi 9
1936 Annibale Frossi 7
1948 John Hansen

Gunnar Nordahl
7
1952 Rajko Mitic

Branko Zebec
7
1956 Todor Veselinovic

Dimitar Milanov

Neville D'Souza
4
1960 Harald Nielsen 8
1964 Ferenc Bene 12
1968 Kunishige Kamamoto 7
1972 Kazimierz Deyna 9
1976 Andrzej Szarmach 6
1980 Sergei Andreev 5
1984 Borislav Cvetković

Stjepan Deveric

Daniel Xuereb
5
1988 Romario 7
1992 Andrzej Juskowiak 7
1996 Bebeto

Hernán Crespo
6
2000 Iván Zamorano 6
2004 Carlos Tévez 8
2008 Giuseppe Rossi 4


Women's medal table

1 3 1 0 4
2 1 0 1 2
3 0 2 0 2
4 0 1 0 1
5 0 0 3 3


Women's results

Year Host Final Third Place Match
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th Place
1996
Details
Atlantamarker 2 - 1 2 - 0
2000
Details
Sydneymarker 3 - 2
asdet
2 - 0
2004
Details
Athensmarker 2 - 1
aet
1 - 0
2008
Details
Beijing 1 - 0
aet
2 - 0




Women's top scorers by tournament

Year Player Goals
1996 Ann Kristin Aarønes

Linda Medalen

Pretinha
4
2000 Sun Wen 4
2004 Cristiane

Birgit Prinz
5
2008 Cristiane 5


See also



References

  1. The East German team represented the United Team of Germany in 1964, winning the bronze medal.
  2. The team represented the United Team of Germany in 1956, and the Federal Republic of Germany (i.e., West Germany) in 1972, 1984 and 1988, and winning the bronze medal in 1988.
  3. The United States had two of the three teams at the 1904 Games, taking the silver and bronze medals.
  4. The 1900 tournament was originally a pair of demonstration matches between the three teams, but has subsequently been upgraded to official status by the IOC with medals attributed to the teams based upon the match results.
  5. The 1904 tournament was originally a set of demonstration matches between the three teams (two from the United States), but has subsequently been upgraded to official status by the IOC with medals attributed to the teams based upon the round-robin results.
  6. In 1920, Czechoslovakia abandoned the final match against Belgium after 40 minutes with the latter up 2-0. They were disqualified, and a mini-tournament to figure out the other medalists was held, with Spain beating the Netherlands for second place 3-1.
  7. In 1972, the third place match between the Soviet Union and East Germany was a 2-2 tie after extra time had expired. Both teams were awarded bronze medals.



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