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Hirosaki Castle, the seat of the Hirosaki Domain
The was a Japanese domain of the Edo period, located in northern Mutsu Province (modern-day Hirosaki, Aomori). It was ruled by the Tsugaru clan. A branch of the family ruled the adjoining Kuroishi Domain.

History

Background

Modern-day map of Japan.
Aomori Prefecture, which contains the former Hirosaki and Kuroishi territories, is highlighted in dark green.


Foundation

The domain was headquartered at Hirosaki Castlemarker.

The domain's karō was Daidōji Naohide; the position of karō remained hereditary in his family.

The Tsugaru clan sided with Tokugawa Ieyasu's Eastern Army during the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600. Its immediate neighbors also all supported the Eastern Army. After the Tokugawa victory at Sekigahara, the Tsugaru clan was granted an increase in territory, along with permission to keep its existing domain of Hirosaki (named for the family's castle town). The domain started out small at 45,000 koku, before being increased in size to 100,000 koku. Tamenobu remained politically active in the early years of the Edo era, mainly in the Kansaimarker area; he died in Kyoto in 1608.

The early years of the Edo era were marked by a series of major O-Ie Sōdō disturbances that shook the Tsugaru family: the of 1607, of 1612, the of 1634, and the of 1647. In 1821, there was a foiled plot by Sōma Daisaku, a former retainer of the Nanbu clan, to assassinate the Tsugaru lord; this stemmed from the old enmity between the two clans.

A major branch of the Tsugaru clan was founded in 1656, which was first given hatamoto rank, before being promoted to daimyo status in 1809; this became the ruling family of the Kuroishi Domain, which immediately bordered its parent family's domain. A lesser branch was founded by Tsugaru Nobuzumi, the son of the first Kuroishi-Tsugaru family head; this branch remained hatamoto through the end of the Edo period. The main Tsugaru family's funerary temple in Hirosaki was located at Chōshō-ji. Though neither Tsugaru daimyo family ever held shogunate office, the Tsugaru of Hirosaki (together with many of the other domains of northern Honshūmarker) assisted the shogunate in policing the frontier region of Ezochimarker (now Hokkaidomarker). In the late Edo period, during the headship of Tsugaru Tsuguakira, the Hirosaki domain's forces were modernized along western lines.

Sub-domains

Disturbances

The early years of the Edo era were marked by a series of major O-Ie Sōdō disturbances that shook the Tsugaru family: the of 1607, of 1612, the of 1634, and the of 1647. In 1821, there was a foiled plot by Sōma Daisaku, a former retainer of the Nanbu clan, to assassinate the Tsugaru lord; this stemmed from the old enmity between the two clans.

Boshin War and dissolution

The Hirosaki domain ceased to exist in 1871. Its territory is now part of Aomori Prefecturemarker.

List of lords



  1. Tamenobu
  2. Nobuhira
  3. Nobuyoshi
  4. Nobumasa
  5. Nobuhisa
  6. Nobuaki
  7. Nobuyasu
  8. Nobuakira (also known as Nobuharu)
  9. Yasuchika
  10. Nobuyuki
  11. Yukitsugu
  12. Tsuguakira


Notes

References

  • McClellan, Edwin (1985). Woman in the Crested Kimono. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Sasaki Suguru (2002). Boshin sensō: haisha no Meiji ishin. Tokyo: Chūōkōron-shinsha.


Further reading

In Japanese

  • Kurotaki, Jūjirō (1984). Tsugaru-han no hanzai to keibatsu 津軽藩の犯罪と刑罰. Hirosaki: Hoppō shinsha.


In English

  • Dazai, Osamu (1985). Return to Tsugaru: travels of a purple tramp. Tokyo: Kodansha International.



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