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International or internationally most often describes interaction between nations, or encompassing two or more nations, constituting a group or association having members in two or more nations, or generally reaching beyond national boundaries. In American English, "International" is also commonly used as a euphemism for "foreign" or even "foreigner."

  • In team sports, "international" commonly refers either to a match between two national teams, or to a player capped by his national team.




  • In linguistics, an "international language" is one spoken by the people of at least two nations, but preferably a large number of nations.


  • In interlinguistics, international often has to do with languages rather than nations themselves. An "international word" is one that occurs in at least two languages, but preferable many more, as with linguistics above. These words are collected from widely spoken source or control languages and often used to establish language systems that people can use to communicate internationally, and sometimes for other purposes such as to learn other languages more quickly. The vocabulary of Interlingua has a particularly wide range, because the control languages of Interlingua were selected to give its words and affixes their maximum geographic scope. In part, the language Ido is also a product of interlinguistic research.




Global is commonly used as a synonym for "international", however such usage is typically incorrect as "global" implies "one world" as a single unit, while "international" recognizes that different peoples, cultures, languages, nations, borders, economies, and ecosystems exist. The word nonetheless sees usage as in various media buzzwords, such as "the global economy" eye.

See also



References

  1. Columbia Guide to Standard American English
  2. Columbia Guide to Standard American English
  3. Gode, Alexander, Interlingua: A Grammar of the International Language. New York: Frederick Ungar, 1951.

Sources




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