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 was the second ship in the two ship   of light cruisers in the Imperial Japanese Navy. It was named after the Tatsuta River in Nara Prefecturemarker, Japanmarker.


Background

The TenryŇę class light cruisers were essentially enlarged destroyers, inspired by and designed with a similar concept to the Royal Navy Arethusa class and s. These ships were designed to act as flagships for destroyer flotillas.

With improvements in oil-fired turbine engine technology, the TenryŇę-class had more than twice the horsepower of the previous , and were capable of the high speed of .

Service career

Early career

Tatsuta was completed at the Sasebo Navy Yard on 31 March 1919. The following year, it was assigned to the Japanese Second Fleet, and patrolled the coast of Russiamarker, providing support to Japanese troops in the Siberian Intervention against the Bolshevik Red Army.

On 19 March 1924, Tatsuta was involved in an accident outside Sasebo harbor, where it collided with (and sank) a training vessel.

Tatsuta was refitted between March 1927 and March 1930, when she was given a tripod foremast.

From 1937-1938, Tatsuta was assigned to patrols of the Chinamarker coast, as the situation between Japan and China deteriorated into the Second Sino-Japanese War. During a refit in 1939, Tatsuta gained two additional 13 mm AA machine guns.

Early Pacific War

In late 1940, Tatsuta was based out of Trukmarker, in the Caroline Islandsmarker, together with its sister ship TenryŇę in CruDiv 18 of the Fourth Fleet under Vice Admiral Marumo Kunimori. At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbormarker, CruDiv 18 was part of the Wake Islandmarker invasion force. Tatsuta was strafed with machine-gun fire by a USMC Grumman Wildcat on 11 December, but otherwise suffered no damage during the first Battle of Wake Island. Tatsuta also participated in the second (successful) invasion attempt on Wake Island on 21 December.

On 20 January 1942, Tatsuta and TenryŇę were assigned to cover troop transports during the invasion of Kaviengmarker, New Irelandmarker. During a refit at Truk on 23 February, two Type 96 twin-mount 25 mm AA guns were installed aft, as part of the heightened awareness of the threat posed by American aircraft.

Solomon Islands and New Guinea campaigns

From March through May, Tatsuta and CruDiv 18 covered numerous troop landings throughout the Solomon Islandsmarker and New Guineamarker, including Laemarker and Salamaua, Bukamarker, Bougainvillemarker, Rabaulmarker, Shortland, and Kietamarker, and Manus Islandmarker, Admiralty Islandsmarker, Tulagimarker and Santa Isabel Islandmarker.

Tatsuta returned to Japan for repairs on 24 May, remaining for a month. On 14 July 1942, in a major reorganization of the Japanese navy, CruDiv 18 under Rear Admiral Mitsuharu Matsuyama came under the newly created Eighth Fleet, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa. On 20 July, Tatsuta was assigned to cover Japanese troop landings in the invasion of Bunamarker, New Guinea. The invasion force was attacked by USAAF B-17 Flying Fortresss and B-26 Marauder bombers, but Tatsuta was unharmed.

On 25 August, Tatsuta was again bombed by B-17s during its coverage of the landing of 1,200 troops of the Kure No. 5 Special Naval Landing Force at Milne Bay, New Guinea, but again escaped without damage. On 6 September, Tatsuta was part of the force assigned to evacuate the surviving troops after their defeat, and in the process bombarded the Gili Gili wharves and sank the 3,199-ton British freighter Anshun. On 6 October, Tatsuta was tasked with the mission to transport the Seventeenth Army and troops to Guadalcanalmarker.

Return to Japan

Tatsuta returned to Maizuru on 19 January 1943 for repairs, and remained in Japan until October making training cruises in the Inland Seamarker with newly commissioned destroyers. On 8 June, while Tatsuta was moored near Hashirajima, the battleship exploded and sank due to an accidental magazine explosion. Tatsuta participated in the rescue operation and recovered 39 wounded survivors.

On 20 October 1943, Tatsuta returned to Truk, and made several troop transport runs to Ponapemarker over the couple of weeks. On its return to Japan on 5 November, the Tatsuta convoy was attacked by near the Bungo Suidomarker. However, the Halibut's main target was the aircraft carrier and battleship , and Tatsuta was ignored.

Tatsuta remained in Japan, resuming its training operations through March 1944.

On 11 March 1944, Tatsuta was assigned to escort a major reinforcement convoy to Saipanmarker. On 13 March 1944 the convoy was attacked by the submarine , on her first war patrol, NNE of HachijŇćjima ( ). Two of four torpedoes hit and sank Tatsuta. Twenty-six crewmen were killed. The destroyers and rescued the survivors including Captain Torii and Rear Admiral Tamotsu Takama.

Tatsuta was removed from the Navy List on 10 May 1944.

List of Captains

  • Chief Equipping Officer - Cmdr. / Capt. Otohiko Kagara - 1 May 1918 - 31 March 1919
  • Capt. Otohiko Kagara - 31 March 1919 - 1 October 1920
  • Capt. Ryokichi Odera - 1 October 1920 - 20 November 1921
  • Cmdr. / Capt. Tatsuzo Kawamura - 20 November 1921 - 29 May 1922 (Promoted to Captain on 1 December 1921.)
  • Capt. Takeshi Takahashi - 29 May 1922 - 20 November 1922
  • Capt. Meijiro Tachi - 20 November 1922 - 10 May 1923
  • Capt. Masashi Takeuchi - 10 May 1923 - 1 December 1923
  • Capt. Hisao Ichimura - 1 December 1923 - 25 March 1924
  • Capt. Sunao Matsuzaki - 25 March 1924 - 10 November 1924
  • Cmdr. / Capt. Shiba Shibayama - 10 November 1924 - 1 December 1925 (Promoted to Captain on 1 December 1924.)
  • Capt. Yoshiyuki Niiyama - 1 December 1925 - 20 May 1926
  • Capt. Heiji Takagi - 20 May 1926 - 1 November 1926
  • Capt. Kanekoto Iwamura - 1 November 1926 - 1 December 1927
  • Capt. Matsushi Yamamoto - 1 December 1927 - 1 May 1929
  • Capt. Takeo Kawana - 1 May 1929 - 30 November 1929
  • Capt. Kunji Tange - 30 November 1929 - 20 November 1930
  • Capt. Takao Sakuma - 20 November 1930 - 1 December 1931
  • Capt. Masukichi Matsuki - 1 December 1931 - 1 December 1932
  • Capt. Aritaka Aihara - 1 December 1932 - 15 November 1933
  • Capt. Shiro Oshima - 15 November 1933 - 1 November 1934
  • Capt. Chuichi Hara - 1 November 1934 - 15 November 1935
  • Capt. Sukeyoshi Yatsushiro - 15 November 1935 - 1 June 1936
  • Capt. Teizaburo Fukuda - 1 June 1936 - 1 April 1937
  • Capt. Gihachi Takayanagi - 1 April 1937 - 1 December 1937
  • Capt. Jihei Yamaguchi - 1 December 1937 - 20 August 1938
  • Capt. Yasunoshin Ito - 20 August 1938 - 25 May 1939
  • Capt. Tadayuki Matsura - 25 May 1939 - 25 September 1940
  • Capt. Masao Sawa - 25 September 1940 - 20 August 1941
  • Capt. Yoshifumi Baba - 20 August 1941 - 20 July 1942
  • Capt. Matake Yoshimura - 20 July 1942 - 1 January 1943
  • Capt. Morie Funaki - 1 January 1943 - 5 April 1943
  • Capt. Nobuki Ogawa - 5 April 1943 - 22 December 1943
  • Capt. Takemi Torii - 22 December 1943 - 13 March 1944


References

Books



External links





Gallery

Image:IJN_Tatsuta_1919.jpg|In 1919Image:IJN_Tatsuta_in_Inland_Sea_1920s.jpg|In the Inland Sea with destroyer flotilla, 1920sImage:IJN Tatsuta at Kure in 1928.jpg|At Kure in 1928Image:IJN_Tatsuta_in_1927_with_Nagato_and_Mutsu.jpg|In 1927 with battleships Nagato and MutsumarkerImage:IJN Tatsuta in 1927.jpg|In 1927 with weather balloonImage:IJN Tatsuta in May 1932.jpg|In May 1932


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