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The Junkers Ju 322 Mammut (Mammoth) was a heavy transport military glider, resembling a giant flying wing, proposed for use by the Luftwaffe in World War II. Only two prototypes were ever built.

Development

Designed in late 1940 by Junkers, the Ju 322 was to be a large glider for transport, to fulfill the same role as the Me 321 Gigant (Giant) glider. The Ju 322 was to be built out of non-strategic materials, using all-wooden construction. Originally it was estimated that the Ju 322 would be capable of carrying 20,000 kg of cargo. It was required to carry a Pz.Kpfw.IV, a Flak 88, a Half-Track or a self propelled gun, plus personnel, ammo and fuel. The Ju 322 carried almost all cargo inside the giant wing. At the centre section of the leading edge of the wing, was a curved cargo door, above the cargo door was the cockpit. The glider's tail extended from the centre section, and had a typical arrangement of stabilizing fins and vertical rudder. Armament for production gliders was planned to be three turrets each housing a single 7.92x57mm machine gun.

Testing

During construction of the first prototype (Ju 322 V1), problems were encountered with building an all-wooden glider. Consequently the planned payload weight for the Ju 322 was reduced to 16,000 kg, and later to 11,000 kg. The Ju 322 V1 made its maiden flight in April 1941, towed by a Junkers Ju 90. The test flight was largely successful, however although design improvements were planned for the Ju 322, the RLMmarker ordered the Ju 322 project dropped in May 1941, considering it an inherently poor design.

Following the cancellation of the project, the Ju 322 V1 completed a few more test flights, but was cut up for fuel along with the Ju 322 V2, and 98 partially completed gliders.

Specifications Ju 322 V1

See also

References

  • Kay, A.L. and Smith, J.R. German Aircraft of World War II. Naval Institute Press, 2002.



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