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The Governor of Indiana is the head of the executive branch of Indianamarker's government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Indiana General Assembly, to convene that body, and to grant pardons, except in cases of treason or impeachment.

The original 1816 Constitution of Indiana provided for the election of a governor and a lieutenant governor every three years. The second and current constitution of 1851 lengthened terms to four years and set the commencement of the governor's term on the second Monday in the January following the election. Governors were allowed to serve for four years in any eight-year period, but this was extended by a 1972 amendment permitting governors to serve for eight years in any twelve-year period. Should the office of governor become vacant, the lieutenant governor assumes the title of governor. Nine lieutenant governors have succeeded to the governorship. If the office of lieutenant governor is vacant, the president pro tempore of the Indiana Senate becomes governor; this has happened once, when James B. Ray succeeded William Hendricks.

While a territory, Indiana had two President-appointed governors. Since statehood in 1816, it has had 47 governors, serving 49 distinct terms; Isaac P. Gray and Henry F. Schricker are the only governors to have served non-consecutive terms. The longest-serving state governors are Otis R. Bowen and Evan Bayh at 8 years, 4 days; territorial governor William Henry Harrison served for over 12 years. The shortest-serving governor is Henry Smith Lane, who served two days before resigning to become a U.S. Senator. The current governor is Mitch Daniels, who took office in 2005 and was reelected in 2008 to serve until January 2013.

Governors

The land that became Indiana was acquired by the United States after the American Revolutionary War. The region was originally organized as the Northwest Territory, consisting of all of the land in the United States north and west of the Ohio River. Indiana Territory was split from the Northwest Territory in 1800.
For the period before Indiana Territory was formed, see the list of Governors of Northwest Territory.


Governors of Indiana Territory

Indiana Territory was formed on July 4, 1800, and consisted of present-day Indiana, Illinoismarker, Wisconsinmarker, and parts of Michiganmarker and Minnesotamarker. Michigan Territory was split from the territory on June 30, 1805, and Illinois Territory followed on March 1, 1809, leaving Indiana Territory with its final borders. From October 1, 1804, to July 4, 1805, the District of Louisiana was under the jurisdiction of Indiana Territory.

# Governor Took office Left office Days in office Appointed by
1 William Henry Harrison May 13, 1800 December 28, 1812 4612 John Adams
Thomas Jefferson
James Madison
John Gibson December 28, 1812 March 3, 1813 65 acting
2 Thomas Posey March 3, 1813 November 7, 1816 1345 James Madison


Governors of Indiana

Indiana was admitted to the Union on December 11, 1816.

#   Governor Took office Left office Party  Lt. Governor Days in office Terms
1   November 7, 1816 September 12, 1822 Democratic-Republican ,

Ratliff Boon
2135
2   September 12, 1822 December 5, 1822 Democratic-Republican vacant 84 ¼
3   December 5, 1822 February 12, 1825 Democratic-Republican 800 ¾Resigned to take elected seat in the United States Senate.
4 February 12, 1825 December 7, 1831 Independent ,

Milton Stapp
2489 ¼+2
5   December 7, 1831 December 6, 1837 Whig 2191 2
6   December 6, 1837 December 9, 1840 Whig 1099 1
7   December 9, 1840 December 6, 1843 Whig 1092 1
8   December 6, 1843 December 26, 1848 Democratic ,

Paris C. Dunning
1847 1⅔
9   December 26, 1848 December 5, 1849 Democratic vacant 344
10   December 5, 1849 January 12, 1857 Democratic ,

Ashbel P. Willard
2595 2
11   January 12, 1857 October 4, 1860 Democratic 1361 ¾
12   October 4, 1860 January 14, 1861 Democratic vacant 102 ¼
13   January 14, 1861 January 16, 1861 Republican 2
14   January 16, 1861 January 23, 1867 Republican 2198 ⅞+1+½
15   January 23, 1867 January 13, 1873 Republican 2182 ½+1
16   January 13, 1873 January 8, 1877 Democratic 1456 1
17   January 8, 1877 November 20, 1880 Democratic 1412 ¾
18   November 20, 1880 January 10, 1881 Democratic vacant 51 ¼
19   January 10, 1881 January 12, 1885 Republican 1463 1
20   January 12, 1885 January 14, 1889 Democratic 1463 1
21   January 14, 1889 November 23, 1891 Republican 1043 ½
22   November 23, 1891 January 9, 1893 Republican vacant 413 ½
23   January 9, 1893 January 11, 1897 Democratic 1463 1
24   January 11, 1897 January 14, 1901 Republican 1464 1
25   January 14, 1901 January 9, 1905 Republican 1456 1
26   January 9, 1905 January 11, 1909 Republican 1463 1
27   January 11, 1909 January 13, 1913 Democratic 1463 1
28   January 13, 1913 January 8, 1917 Democratic 1456 1
29   January 8, 1917 January 10, 1921 Republican 1463 1
30   January 10, 1921 April 30, 1924 Republican 1206 ¾
31   April 30, 1924 January 12, 1925 Republican vacant 257 ¼
32   January 12, 1925 January 14, 1929 Republican 1463 1
33   January 14, 1929 January 9, 1933 Republican 1456 1
34   January 9, 1933 January 11, 1937 Democratic 1463 1
35   January 11, 1937 January 13, 1941 Democratic 1463 1
36   January 13, 1941 January 8, 1945 Democratic 1456 1
37   January 8, 1945 January 10, 1949 Republican 1463 1
38   January 10, 1949 January 12, 1953 Democratic

Rue J. Alexander
1463 1
39   January 12, 1953 January 14, 1957 Republican 1463 1
40   January 14, 1957 January 9, 1961 Republican 1456 1
41   January 9, 1961 January 11, 1965 Democratic 1463 1
42   January 11, 1965 January 13, 1969 Democratic 1463 1
43   January 13, 1969 January 9, 1973 Republican 1457 1
44   January 9, 1973 January 13, 1981 Republican 2926 2
45   January 13, 1981 January 9, 1989 Republican 2918 2
46   January 9, 1989 January 13, 1997 Democratic 2926 2
47   January 13, 1997 September 13, 2003 Democratic 2434
48   September 13, 2003 January 10, 2005 Democratic 485 ½
49   January 10, 2005 incumbent Republican 1+


Notes

  1. IN Const. art V
  2. 1816 Const. art. IV, § 3
  3. IN Const. art. V, § 1
  4. McLauchlan p. 94
  5. IN Const. art. V, § 10
  6. Woollen, p. 56
  7. Funk, p. 204
  8. Funk, p. 188
  9. Funk, p. 36
  10. Does not include acting lieutenant governors. All lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor.
  11. The fractional terms of some governors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple governors served due to resignations and deaths. Note that before 1851 the gubernatorial term was three years, and it was four years after 1851.
  12. Christopher Harrison served as acting governor for three months in 1819 while Jennings conducting negotiations with native tribes
  13. Resigned to take elected seat in the United States House of Representatives.
  14. As lieutenant governor, filled unexpired term.
  15. As president pro tempore of the Indiana Senate, filled unexpired term.
  16. At age 31, the youngest person to serve as governor
  17. Died in office.
  18. Governor Daniels' term expires on January 14, 2013; he is term limited.
  19. Woollen, pp. 1–5
  20. Woollen, p. 28
  21. Woollen, pp. 29–31
  22. Woollen, p. 96


Other high offices held

This is a table of congressional seats and other federal offices held by governors. All representatives and senators mentioned represented Indiana except where noted. * denotes those offices which the governor resigned to take. † denotes those offices from which the governor resigned to take the governorship.

Governor Gubernatorial term U.S. House U.S. Senate Other offices held Sources
1800–1812 (territorial) Delegate from Northwest Territory†, U.S. Representative and Senator from Ohiomarker, Minister to Gran Colombia, President of the United States
1813–1816 (territorial) U.S. Senator from Louisianamarker
1816–1822 H* Delegate from Indiana Territory
1822 H
1822–1825 H† S*
1837–1840 H
1843–1848 S*
1849–1857 H S Minister to Prussia
1861 H S*
1861–1867 S*
1873–1877 H S Vice President of the United States
1877–1880 H†
1881–1885 H Minister to Italy
1888–1891 H† Minister to Peru
1905–1909 H
1909–1913 Vice President of the United States
1913–1917 S
1933–1937 High Commissioner to the Philippines, Ambassador to the Philippines
1973–1981 U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services
1981–1989 Ambassador to Singapore
1989–1997 S
2005– Director of the Office of Management and Budget


Living former governors

, four former governors were alive. The most recent governor to die was Robert D. Orr (1981–1989), on March 10, 2004. The most recently-serving governor to die was Frank O'Bannon (1997–2003), in office on September 13, 2003.


Name Gubernatorial term Date of birth
Edgar Whitcomb 1969–1973
Otis R. Bowen 1973–1981
Evan Bayh 1989–1997
Joe Kernan 2003–2005


See also



References

General


Constitutions


Specific
  1. IN Const. art V
  2. 1816 Const. art. IV, § 3
  3. IN Const. art. V, § 1
  4. McLauchlan p. 94
  5. IN Const. art. V, § 10
  6. Woollen, p. 56
  7. Funk, p. 204
  8. Funk, p. 188
  9. Funk, p. 36
  10. Does not include acting lieutenant governors. All lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor.
  11. The fractional terms of some governors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple governors served due to resignations and deaths. Note that before 1851 the gubernatorial term was three years, and it was four years after 1851.
  12. Christopher Harrison served as acting governor for three months in 1819 while Jennings conducting negotiations with native tribes
  13. Resigned to take elected seat in the United States House of Representatives.
  14. As lieutenant governor, filled unexpired term.
  15. As president pro tempore of the Indiana Senate, filled unexpired term.
  16. At age 31, the youngest person to serve as governor
  17. Died in office.
  18. Governor Daniels' term expires on January 14, 2013; he is term limited.
  19. Woollen, pp. 1–5
  20. Woollen, p. 28
  21. Woollen, pp. 29–31
  22. Woollen, p. 96



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