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List of United States Senators from Vermont: Map

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Vermontmarker was admitted to the Union on March 4, 1791. Its current United States Senators are Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders. Leahy is the only Democrat ever elected to the Senate from Vermont.

Class I Senators

Senator Party Took office Left office Reason Notes
Moses Robinson Democratic-
Republican
October 17, 1791 October 15, 1796 Resigned Governor of Vermont (1789–1790)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1778–1789)
Isaac Tichenor Federalist October 18, 1796 October 17, 1797 Resigned Governor of Vermont (1797–1807; 1808–1809)
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1883–1884)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1794–1796)

Nathaniel Chipman Federalist October 17, 1797 March 4, 1803 Lost re-election Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1790–1791; 1796–1797; 1813–1815)
Israel Smith Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 October 1, 1807 Resigned Governor of Vermont (1807–1808)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1797–1798)
Jonathan Robinson Democratic-
Republican
October 10, 1807 March 4, 1815 Retired Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1801–1807)
Isaac Tichenor Federalist March 4, 1815 March 4, 1821 Governor of Vermont (1797–1807; 1808–1809)
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1883–1884)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1794–1796)

Horatio Seymour Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 March 4, 1833 Retire
National
Republican
Benjamin Swift Whig March 4, 1833 March 4, 1839 Retired
Samuel S. Phelps Whig March 4, 1839 March 4, 1851 Also served in Vermont's class III seat
Solomon Foot National
Republican
March 4, 1851 March 28, 1866 Died Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1837–1838)
Whig
George F. Edmunds Republican April 3, 1866 November 1, 1891 Resigned President pro tempore of Senate (1883–1885)
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1856–1859)
President pro tempore of the Vermont Senate (1861–1862)
Member of the 1876 Electoral Commission (1877)


Redfield Proctor Republican November 2, 1891 March 4, 1908 Died Secretary of War (1889–1891)
Governor of Vermont (1878–1880)
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont (1876–1878)
President pro tempore of the Vermont Senate (1874–1875)


John W. Stewart Republican March 24, 1908 October 21, 1908 Retired Governor of Vermont (1870–1872)
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1865–1867; 1876)
Carroll S. Page Republican October 21, 1908 March 4, 1923 Retired Governor of Vermont (1890–1892)
Frank L. Greene Republican March 4, 1923 December 17, 1930 Died
Frank C. Partridge Republican December 23, 1930 March 31, 1931 Lost nomination for special election Minister Resident to Venezuela
Warren Austin Republican April 1, 1931 August 2, 1946 Resigned U.N. Ambassador (1947–1953)
Ralph Flanders Republican November 1, 1946 January 3, 1959 Retired President of the Federal Reserve Board of Boston (1944–1946)
Winston L. Prouty Republican January 3, 1959 September 10, 1971 Died Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1947)
Robert Stafford Republican September 16, 1971 January 3, 1989 Retired Governor of Vermont (1959–1961)
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont (1957–1959)
Jim Jeffords Republican January 3, 1989 January 3, 2007 Retired
Independent
Bernie Sanders Independent January 3, 2007 Incumbent


Class III Senators

Senator Party Took office Left office Reason Notes
Stephen R. Bradley Democratic-
Republican
October 17, 1791 March 4, 1795 Lost re-election Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1785)
Elijah Paine Federalist March 4, 1795 September 1, 1801 Resigned
Stephen R. Bradley Democratic-
Republican
October 15, 1801 March 4, 1813 Retired
Dudley Chase Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1813 November 3, 1817 Resigned Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1808–1812)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1817–1821)
James Fisk Democratic-
Republican
November 4, 1817 January 8, 1818 Resigned
William A. Palmer Democratic-
Republican
October 20, 1818 March 4, 1825 Retired Governor of Vermont (1831–1835)
National
Republican
Dudley Chase National
Republican
March 4, 1825 March 4, 1831 Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1808–1812)
Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1817–1821)
Samuel Prentiss National
Republican
March 4, 1831 April 11, 1842 Resigned Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1829–1831)
Whig
Samuel C. Crafts Whig April 23, 1842 March 4, 1843 Governor of Vermont (1828–1831)
William Upham Whig March 4, 1843 January 14, 1853 Died
Samuel S. Phelps Whig January 17, 1853 March 16, 1854 Lost entitlement to sit Also served in Vermont's class I seat
Lawrence Brainerd Free Soil October 14, 1854 March 4, 1855 Retired
Jacob Collamer Whig March 4, 1855 November 9, 1865 Died Postmaster General (1849–1850)
Republican
Luke P. Poland Republican November 21, 1865 March 4, 1867 Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1860–1865)
Justin S. Morrill Republican March 4, 1867 December 28, 1898 Died
Jonathan Ross Republican January 11, 1899 October 18, 1900 Retired Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court (1890–1899)
William P. Dillingham Republican October 18, 1900 July 23, 1923 Died Governor of Vermont (1888–1890)
Porter H. Dale Republican November 7, 1923 October 6, 1933 Died
Ernest W. Gibson Republican November 21, 1933 June 20, 1940 Died
Ernest W. Gibson, Jr. Republican June 24, 1940 November 5, 1940 Retired Governor of Vermont (1946–1950)
George Aiken Republican January 10, 1941 January 3, 1975 Retired Governor of Vermont (1937–1941)
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont (1935–1937)
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives (1933–1935)

Patrick Leahy Democratic January 3, 1975 Incumbent


Notes

  1. Phelps had been appointed by the governor during a recess of the state legislature, and the legislature later convened and adjourned a session without electing a senator to replace fill the vacancy. The Senate ruled that Phelps had lost his entitlement to sit when the legislature adjourned. See, The Constitution in Congress.


See also




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