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These are lists of religious demographics and religions by country.

Four largest religions

World Religions
Four largest religions Adherents % of World Population Wikipage
World Population 6.671 billion Figure used by individual articles
Christianity 1.637 billion - 1.923 billion 24.54% - 28.82% Christianity by country
Islam 1.525 billion - 1.559 billion 22.752% - 23.312% Islam by country
Buddhism 489 million - 1.512 billion 7.33% - 22.67% Buddhism by country
Hinduism 965 million - 971 million 14.47% - 14.55% Hinduism by country
Total 4.541 billion - 5.920 billion 68.08% - 88.74%




The table above is compiled from the relevant Wikipedia pages listing Religions by Country. Please note that although figures are an approximation there are many sources. Please see individual pages (Linked in Table) for details.

The numbers of adherents to organised religions in the world is difficult to accurately ascertain. Therefore figures and estimates are included from multiple sources to show the reader the problem in compiling such statistics.

Adherents.com Estimates

Adherents.com says "Sizes shown are 'approximate estimates, and are here mainly for the purpose of ordering the groups, not providing a definitive number."

Religion Adherents
Christianity 2.1 billion
Islam 1.5 billion
Secularism/irreligious/agnostic/atheism 1.1 billion
Hinduism 900 million
Chinese traditional religion 394 million
Buddhism 376 million
Animist religions 300 million
African traditional/diasporic religions 100 million
Sikhism 23 million
Juche 19 million
Spiritism 15 million
Judaism 14 million
Bahá'í Faith 7 million
Jainism 4.2 million
Shinto 4 million
Cao Dai 4 million
Zoroastrianism 2.6 million
Tenrikyo 2 million
Neo-Paganism 1 million
Unitarian Universalism 800,000
Rastafari Movement 600,000
Scientology 25,000 to 55,000


Notes

-Note that these figures may incorporate populations of secular/nominal adherents as well as syncretist worshipers, although the concept of syncretism is disputed by some.

-Note that for Eastern religions such as Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto or animism, etc...people often have religions which are a mix of belief systems. This leads to the unusually large uncertainty in the calculations for Buddhism. The lower number of approximately 400 million represents traditional Buddhists (have taken refuge in the Three Jewels, those following all of the precepts of Buddhisim laid down by the Buddha,) whereas the larger number of 1.5 billion includes "natural Buddhists" (as well as secular/nominal Buddhists), lacking specific ceremony, as long as they do not profess belief in another religion. Main article: Buddhism by country.

-Note that it is hard to accurately report the actual number of adherents of Judaism as there are Jews that do not practice the religion that may be under the secular/irreligious category even though they are fully Jewish.

-Note that atheists are a small subset of the nonreligious/Secular grouping. According to Adherents.com, half of the nonreligious/Secular group are theistic.

By proportion

Christians

Countries with the greatest proportion of Christians from Christianity by country (as of 2007):

  1. 100%
  2. 99.8% (mostly Apostolic {not protestant} & Orthodox)
  3. 99% (Roman Catholic 99%)
  4. 98.7%
  5. 40% to 98.5% (Eastern Orthodox 86.8%, Roman Catholic 4.7%, Protestant 7.5%)
  6. 81% to 98.3% (Orthodox 97.0%, Roman Catholic 1.0%, Protestant and Pentecostal 0.3%)
  7. 98.2% (mostly Eastern Orthodox)
  8. 31% to 98% (Evangelical Lutheran 95%, other Christian includes Protestant and Roman Catholic 3%)
  9. 98% (Roman Catholic)
  10. 98% (Roman Catholic 96%, Protestant 2%)
  11. 97% (Roman Catholic 95%)
  12. 96.9% (Roman Catholic 89.6%, Protestant 6.2%, other Christian 1.1%)
  13. 96.3% (Baptist 35.4%, Anglican 15.1%, Roman Catholic 13.5%, Pentecostal 8.1%, Church of God 4.8%, Methodist 4.2%, other 15.2%)
  14. 35% to 96.1% (mostly Ukrainian Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant)
  15. 96% (Orthodox 80%, Roman Catholic 20%)
  16. 95% (mostly Roman Catholic)
  17. 94.7% (mostly Roman Catholic)
  18. 40% to 94.5% (mostly Roman Catholic 90%)
  19. 94% (Roman Catholic 53%, Anglican 13.8%, other Protestant 33.2%)
  20. 87% to 94% (mostly Roman Catholic)
  21. 79% to 94% (mostly Roman Catholic 92%, Protestant 2%,)
  22. 76% to 94%(mostly Roman Catholic)


Muslims

Countries with the greatest proportion of Muslims from Islam by country (as of 2007):

  1. 99.9% (mostly Sunni)
  2. 99.9% (mostly Sunni)
  3. 99.8% (mostly Sunni)
  4. 99.41% (mostly Sunni)
  5. 99% (80% Sunni, 19% Shi'a)
  6. 99% (mostly Sunni)
  7. 99% (85% Sunni, 15% Alevis)
  8. 99% (65-70% Sunni, 30-35% Shi'a)
  9. 98.7% (mostly Sunni)
  10. 98% (mostly Shi'a)
  11. 98% (mostly Sunni)
  12. 98% (mostly Sunni)
  13. 97% (mostly Sunni)
  14. 97% (60-65% Shi'a, 32-37% Sunni)
  15. 97% (75-80% Sunni, 20-25% Shi'a)
  16. 95% (mostly Sunni)
  17. 94% (mostly Sunni)
  18. 94% (mostly Sunni)
  19. 93.4% (75% Shi'a, 18% Sunni)
  20. 92.66% (divided Ibadhi and Sunni)


Remarks: Although Islam is the state religion of most Middle Eastern countries,this list excludes Saudi Arabiamarker where 100% of national citizens are Muslims, because there are large numbers of non-Muslims there (mostly Hindu and Christian; as well as Buddhist, Sikh and Jewish minorities). So the total Muslim population in Saudi Arabia is around 25 million (20 million native Saudi citizens with 1.5 million Bangladeshismarker, 1 million Pakistanismarker, 1 million Egyptians, 600,000 Indonesiansmarker, 250,000 Palestinians, and significant Muslim numbers among 1.6 million Indiansmarker, 150,000 Lebanese, as well as 100,000 Eritreansmarker) or only about 90% of the total population. Some other Persian Gulf countries such as Bahrainmarker, Kuwaitmarker, Qatarmarker and United Arab Emiratesmarker are also excluded due to their large number of non-Muslim foreign immigrants.

Buddhists

Countries with the greatest proportion of Buddhists (included other folk religions) from Buddhism by country (as of 2007):
  1. 67% - 98% (mostly 67% Theravada with 31% traditional animist.)
  2. 20% - 95% (mostly Mahayana with Shinto, Japanese 3%, Christian 0.8%, Muslim 0.1%)
  3. 95% (mostly Theravada, Muslim 3%, Christian and other 2%)
  4. 95% (Theravada, Muslim 4%, Christian 0.7%, other 0.3%)
  5. 50% - 94% (mostly Tibetan, Muslim 5%, Christian and other 1%)
  6. 35.1% - 93% (mostly "Triple religion", Christian 4.5%, other 2.5%)
  7. 10% - 90% (mostly "Triple religion", Christian and others 10%)
  8. 89% (Theravada with traditional animist, Christian 4%, Muslim 4%, other)
  9. 12% - 85% ("Triple religion", Christian 8%, Cao Dai 3%, Atheist and other 3.5%)
  10. 17% - 85% ("Triple religion", Christian 8%, Atheist or other 7%)
  11. 8% - 80% ("Triple religion", Atheist 12.5%, Christian 4%, Muslim 1.5%)
  12. 75% (mostly Lamaistic, Hindu 2%, other 1%)
  13. 70% (Theravada, Hindu 15%, Christian 7.9%, Muslim 7.1%)
  14. 2% - 64.5% (Mahayana with Confucianist, over 90% influenced by Juche)
  15. 42.5% - 61% ("Triple religion", Muslim 14.9%, Christian 14.6%, Hindu 4%, other)
  16. 22.8% - 50% (Mahayana with Confucianist, Christian 30%, other 1%)
  17. 19.2% - 22% (Muslim 60.3%, "Triple religion", Christian 9%, Hindu 6.3%, other 2.4%)
  18. 14% (Muslim 67%, "Triple religion", Christian 10%, other 9%)
  19. 11% (Hindu 81%, Tibetian Buddhist, Muslim 4%, other 4%)


Remarks:"Triple religion" (or "Chinese-Mahayana Buddhism" or "Far East Asian Buddhism") is the mixture of Mahayana Buddhism, with Taoism and Confucianism. Because officially Communist governments that often forcibly suppressed religious expressions still rule a number of traditionally Buddhist countries, and because Buddhists often practice other traditional East Asian religions, the figures could be much higher in these regions. Mahayana Buddhism in Far East Asian countries has a very wide meaning. That is why in such countries as China, Japan, Vietnam, North and South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, the three religions of Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism are often all considered at once. This is referred to as a "Triple religion", with Gautama Buddha in the center, Laozi in the left, and Confucius in the right. In some regions, such as Japan, belief systems vary with differing emphasis on Shintoism, as well as Ancestor Worship. As such, the Buddhist population is difficult to gauge exactly, but is often nominal. The lesser percentage given is a number of Buddhists who have taken the formal step of going for refuge. And the wider percentage given are informal/nominal adherents of combined Buddhism with its related religions

In India the scheduled caste and scheduled Tribes(SC/ST) people are mostly accepted Buddhist religion,but due to some reason they are still counting as Hindu by authorities.this people are around 24 cores.so the Buddhist population in India rises.



. See Buddhism by country and Irreligion for more.

Hindus

Countries with the greatest proportion of Hindus from Hinduism by country (as of 2007):

  1. 81%
  2. 80.5%
  3. 54%
  4. 33%
  5. 27.4%
  6. 25%
  7. 22.5%
  8. 15%
  9. 15%
  10. 12%
  11. 10.5%
  12. 7.2%
  13. 6.7%
  14. 6.3%
  15. 6.25%
  16. 4%
  17. 3%
  18. 2.3%
  19. 2.02%
  20. 2%; 2%


Jews

Countries with the greatest proportion of Jews (as of 2007):
  1. 76.2% (Muslim 16.1%, Christian 2.1%)
  2. 11.09% (Muslim 83.54%, Christian 4.73%)
  3. 3% (Christian 90%)
  4. 2.5% (Christian 78%, Muslim 1%)
  5. 2.1% (Christian 88.3%, Muslim 4%, Hindu 1.8%)
  6. 1.71% (Christian 77.95%)
  7. 1.3% (Christian 92.3%)
  8. 1.1% (Christian 77.1%, Muslim 2%, Buddhist 1.1%)
  9. 1% (Christian 83.3%, Muslim 10%, Buddhist 1.2%)
  10. 1% (Christian 96%)
  11. 0.8% (Christian 94%, Muslim 1.5%)
  12. 0.8% (Christian 75%)
  13. 0.75% (Christian 65% - 68%, Atheist 30% - 34%)
  14. 0.5% (Christian 78%, Muslim 10 - 14%, Buddhist 1.1% - 1.45%)
  15. 0.5% (Christian 71.6%, Muslim 2.7%, Buddhist 1.2%, Hindu 1%)
  16. 0.45% (Christian 63.9%, Buddhist 2.1%, Muslim 1.7%, others)
  17. 0.3% (Christian 29% - 51%, Atheist 41% - 50%, Muslim 5.5% - 5.8%)
  18. 0.25% (Christian 68%, Non-Religious 25.5%, Muslim 3.9%, Buddhist 1%)
  19. 0.22% (Christian 88.6%, Muslim 9.9%, Atheist 0.7%)


Bahá'ís

Countries with the greatest proportion of Bahá'ís (as of 2000):
  1. 9.22%
  2. 6.09%
  3. 5.86%
  4. 4.70%
  5. 4.33%
  6. 3.72%
  7. 3.25%
  8. 2.98%
  9. 2.78%
  10. 2.73%
  11. 2.37%
  12. 2.09%
  13. 1.95%
  14. 1.88%
  15. 1.84%
  16. 1.70%
  17. 1.61%
  18. 1.61%
  19. 1.53%
  20. 1.50%


Sources: Year 2000 Estimated Baha'i statistics from: David Barrett, World Christian Encyclopedia, 2000; Total population statistics, mid-2000 from Population Reference Bureau [73014] and The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2004.

By population

Christians

Largest Christian populations (as of 2007):

  1. 234,889,159
  2. 169,109,476
  3. 103,265,846
  4. 100,964,426
  5. 84,246,490
  6. 59,176,360
  7. 56,032,677
  8. 55,216,284
  9. 54,012,466
  10. 51,874,076
  11. 47,131,322
  12. 43,515,786
  13. 42,572,167
  14. 41,938,720
  15. 38,021,300
  16. 37,883,811
  17. 36,977,511
  18. 35,066,269
  19. 32,496,275
  20. 28,792,702


Muslims

Largest Muslim populations (as of 2007):

  1. 207,000,105
  2. 159,799,666
  3. 151,402,065
  4. 132,446,365
  5. 72,301,532
  6. 70,047,060
  7. 67,515,582
  8. 64,089,571
  9. 33,723,418
  10. 32,999,884
  11. 31,571,023
  12. 27,565,551
  13. 26,674,649
  14. 25,095,899
  15. 24,564,924
  16. 24,446,452
  17. 22,008,225
  18. 19,827,778
  19. 19,792,885
  20. 17,383,272


Buddhists

Largest Buddhist populations (as of 2007):

  1. 105,748,151 - 1,057,481,510
  2. 25,486,699 - 122,336,154
  3. 13,641,977 - 72,473,003
  4. 61,814,742
  5. 42,636,562
  6. 11,427,436 - 24,522,395
  7. 8,000,605 - 21,258,751
  8. 16,947,992
  9. 466,035 - 15,029,613
  10. 14,648,421
  11. 13,296,109
  12. 4,369,739 - 6,391,558
  13. 705,022 - 6,282,371
  14. 2,107,980 - 6,022,799
  15. 5,460,683
  16. 3,179,197
  17. 1,935,029 - 2,781,888
  18. 1,475,893 - 2,774,679
  19. 2,346,940
  20. 2,276,932


Hindus

Largest Hindu populations (as of 2007):

  1. 909,542,254
  2. 23,410,450
  3. 15,797,076
  4. 4,693,880
  5. 3,327,787
  6. 3,138,947
  7. 1,563,741
  8. 1,204,560
  9. 944,352
  10. 625,441
  11. 607,762
  12. 549,973
  13. 369,137
  14. 354,458
  15. 333,901
  16. 303,163
  17. 300,667
  18. 253,801
  19. 237,737
  20. 262,120


Jews

Largest Jewish populations (as of 2007):

  1. 6,214,247
  2. 5,278,274
  3. 753,382
  4. 636,303
  5. 414,283
  6. 306,876
  7. 210,977
  8. 202,538
  9. 149,602
  10. 94,978
  11. 93,290
  12. 88,994
  13. 67,823
  14. 60,180
  15. 54,350
  16. 54,073
  17. 52,285
  18. 32,780
  19. 30,728
  20. 30,060


Bahá'ís

Largest Bahá'í populations (as of 2005):

  1. 1,823,631
  2. 456,767
  3. 376,328
  4. 368,095
  5. 252,159
  6. 247,499
  7. 224,763
  8. 213,651
  9. 212,272
  10. 206,029
  11. 163,772
  12. 155,907
  13. 84,276
  14. 79,461
  15. 78,967
  16. 78,541
  17. 71,203
  18. 68,441
  19. 58,208
  20. 51,744


Lists by country



See also



Notes

  1. Vipassana Foundation - Buddhists around the world
  2. "Counting the Buddhist World Fairly," by Dr. Alex Smith
  3. International Religious Freedom Report 2007 - Romania
  4. CIA - The World Factbook - Field Listing - Religions
  5. CIA - The World Factbook - Denmark
  6. CIA - The World Factbook - Malta
  7. Schimmel, Karen. Bolivia ( "Major World Nations " book series). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 95.
  8. Віруючим якої церкви, конфесії Ви себе вважаєте?
  9. [1]
  10. [2]
  11. International Religious Freedom Report 2005, by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, U.S. Department of State, November 8, 2005.
  12. International Religious Freedom Report 2008: Costa Rica. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (September 14, 2007). This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  13. [3]
  14. Marita Carballo. Valores culturales al cambio del milenio (ISBN 950-794-064-2). Cited in La Nación, 8 May 2005
  15. CIA - The World Factbook - Spain
  16. CIA - The World factbook -- Saudi Arabia
  17. International Religious Freedom Report 2008 - Saudi Arabia
  18. (67% Buddhist according to a 2005 census) taken in 2009 at September 9 from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/la.html
  19. Zickgraf, Ralph. Laos (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 9-10.
  20. "A Brief Survey of Religion in Modern Japan " (1998). By Paul A. Shew, December 1, 1992. (Waseda University, Tokyo)
  21. state.gov Of citizens who claimed a faith, 51 percent were Shinto, 44 percent were Buddhist and 1 percent was Christian. Shintoism and Buddhism are not mutually exclusive and most Shinto and Buddhist believers follow both faiths
  22. http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2779.htm
  23. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2006/71350.htm
  24. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2007/90134.htm
  25. [with more than 75% identifying themselves as Buddhists or Taoists]http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/35855.htm
  26. US Department of State." state.gov." 2008 Religious Freedom Report. Retrieved on 2009-07-06.
  27. Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584.
  28. International Religious Freedom Report 2006 - Macau
  29. International Religious Freedom Report 2007 - Macau
  30. http://www.adherents.com/largecom/Juche.html
  31. according to a 2000 census from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html
  32. http://pewresearch.org/pubs/657/south-koreas-coming-election-highlights-christian-community
  33. state.gov
  34. state.gov
  35. About Korea - Religion
  36. Every Culture - South Koreans
  37. Every Culture - Culture of SOUTH KOREA
  38. National Geographic
  39. Oproject
  40. Maps of War- History of Religion
  41. Thing Quest
  42. Wads Worth
  43. Worth - Religions in Asia
  44. Britannica
  45. The Range of Religious Freedom
  46. Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 162.
  47. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2007/90227.htm
  48. [4]


References



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