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The London Knights are a junior ice hockey team from Londonmarker, Ontariomarker, Canadamarker, playing in the Ontario Hockey League, one of the leagues of the Canadian Hockey League.

History

Early days–1968

London Nationals logo.
The team was founded as an Ontario Hockey Association junior A team in 1965 as the London Nationals . Prior to 1965, the team's history dated back to the early 1950s, playing in the Western Junior B league out of the Ontario Arena at the Western Fairgrounds. They won the Western Junior B title in 1952 as the London Lou Ball Juniors, after sponsor Lou Ball's clothing store. In 1963 the Toronto Maple Leafs began sponsoring the team, by now called the Nationals after sponsor the Canadian National Recreation Association, an organization of Canadian National Railways employees. The Leafs traditionally had affiliations with the Toronto Marlboros and St. Michael's Majors, however with the withdrawal of the Majors from the OHA and the collapse of the Metro Junior A League, the Leafs were left with one team only. They decided to sponsor the junior team in London, which would play at the new London Gardens and be promoted to the OHA. The league initially balked at the proposition, however, and so the Nationals continued to play junior B, winning the London Free Press Trophy as league champions in 1964 and 1965. For the 1965–66 season the team was finally admitted to major junior hockey. The team's uniforms were copies of those of the Maple Leafs, coloured in blue and white and with a Leaf logo with "London Nationals" spelled out on the front.


The Darwin Era, 1968–86

London Knights logo, 1968–86.
In 1968, businessman Howard Darwin bought the London Nationals (he also owned the Ottawa 67's) as the era of NHL sponsorship of junior hockey ended. Darwin wanted to give a fresh look to the team, and so held a contest to rename the team. Londoner Brian Logie suggested the name Knights, and the team's colours were changed to green, white and gold. In 1970 the team also hired trainer Don Brankley, who stayed with the team until retiring at the end of the 2007–08 season. The team grew from a chronic also-ran in the late 1960s and early 1970s to a contender near the end of the decade. The highlight of the Darwin era came in 1976–77, when a powerful Knights team led by future NHLers Rob Ramage, Brad Marsh and Dino Ciccarelli defeated the St. Catharines Fincups in the conference final on an overtime goal by Dan Eastman to advance to the OHL final against the 67's. However, the 67's were triumphant in six games in the league final. In the early 1980s the Knights descended to a nadir in franchise history, with small crowds and a poor record. However, right winger Brendan Shanahan would soon rise to prominence and help to draw larger crowds.


New Owners, New Dawn, 1986–94

London Knights logo, 1986–94.
In 1986 Howard Darwin sold the Knights and the arena to Paris, Ontario businessmen Jack Robillard, Al Martin and Bob Wilson. The trio also owned the Hamilton Steelhawks. The Knights were sold for a dollar but the London Gardens was sold at market value. The new ownership group modernized the team's logo and renovated the Gardens. Under their stewardship the Knights would go on a run of success. Between 1987 and 1993 the team would finish no lower than third in the Emms Division, including a division title in 1989–90. However, regular season success did not translate into playoff success, as the Knights would never make the league final in these years.


Knightmare and Redemption 1994–2000

In 1994 the Knights were sold to St. Thomas, Ontariomarker, real estate developer Doug Tarry, Sr.. He died before the team had played a game under his ownership, and the team was inherited by his son, Doug Tarry, Jr.. Upon taking command, Tarry carried out further renovations on the Gardens including a name change to the "London Ice House." He also alienated a fair portion of the team's fan base by changing the team's uniforms from traditional green and gold to eggplant and teal, and changing the logo to a cartoonish Spider-Man caricature, instantly and derisively nicknamed "Spiderknight"[55804] by the faithful. The 1995–96 OHL season went down in history as the worst in the history of the Canadian Hockey League. The Knights set a new record for futility by winning only three games all season in sixty-six tries, finishing with nine points and a 3-60-3 record. The years following the so-called "Knightmare" season were improved, but the team was still a long way from the league's upper echelon. Meanwhile, the Ice House was falling apart as the Tarry family had stopped putting money into it as a part of their lobbying the city of London for a new arena. However, the re-signing of former Head Coach Gary Agnew, and the signing of future NHLers Rico Fata and Tom Kostopoulos heralded a marked turnaround for the team's fortunes. In 1999, the Knights went on an unexpected playoff run, in which they defeated the number-one-in-the-CHL Plymouth Whalers in seven games in the quarterfinals and ultimately went all the way to the OHL championship, which they lost in seven games to the Belleville Bulls.

The Hunter Era, 2000–present

Alternate London Knights logo, 2002–present.
In 2000, former NHL players Dale Hunter and Mark Hunter bought the Knights from (Doug Tarry Jr.) brokered by George Georgopoulos who was negotiating with the City of London for the development of a state of the art mult-purpose entertainment centre and arena - John Labatt Centre (The JLC). The Hunters began the process of rebuilding by firstly joining in the lobbying for a new 9,900 seat arena in Downtown London and putting together a smart scouting network. The Ice House was scheduled to be sold and close at the conclusion of the 2001–02 OHL season, and as a treat for their fans, the Knights changed back to their 1986–94 green and gold uniforms in February 2002. In October that year the John Labatt Centremarker opened, and new, modernized versions of the old green and gold uniforms debuted. The 2003–04 OHL season would mark the beginning of a remarkable dynasty. The Knights had the best record in the CHL after the regular season, also setting an OHL record with 110 points, but they lost to the Guelph Storm in the OHL Western Conference final. In the 2004–05 season, the Knights broke a CHL record, going 31 games in a row without a loss (29-0-2).[55805] The previous record of 29 games, held by the 1978–79 Brandon Wheat Kings (who went 25-0-4 during their streak), was broken with a 0-0 tie against the Guelph Storm on December 10, 2004. The streak ended at 31 games after a 5-2 loss to the Sudbury Wolves on December 17. The Knights finished the season with 120 points (59 wins, 7 losses, 2 ties), breaking their own OHL record set the previous season. In the playoffs, the Knights started by sweeping two best-of-seven series against the Guelph Storm and Windsor Spitfires. In the Western Conference final, the Knights defeated the Kitchener Rangers 4-1 to win the Wayne Gretzky Trophy. In the OHL finals against the Ottawa 67's, the Knights won the series 4-1 to win their first J. Ross Robertson Cup, and in so doing, ended the longest championship drought in the CHL. That same year, the London Knights and the John Labatt Centre were awarded the right to host 2005 Memorial Cup Tournament, which was played from May 21 to May 29. In the tournament, they defeated the Rimouski Océanic 4-3 on May 21, the Kelowna Rockets 4-2 on May 23, and the Ottawa 67's 5-2 on May 26. This earned the Knights a bye into the championship game. On May 29, the Knights defeated Rimouski 4-0 to win their first Memorial Cup. In 2005–06, the team won their third consecutive Hamilton Spectator Trophy for winning the regular season title, but their run into the playoffs ended with a loss to Peterborough in the OHL final. In 2006–07 the Knights continued their run of success, winning their fourth consecutive Hamilton Spectator Trophy as regular season champions. However, they lost the Western Conference Championship to the Plymouth Whalers.On January 9 2009, the London Knights made a blockbuster trade. They acquired hockey phenom and projected number one pick in the 2009 NHL draft, John Tavares from the Oshawa Generals. The Knights also received defenceman Michael Del Zotto and goaltender Darryl Borden. In return, the Generals got defenceman Scott Valentine, forward Christian Thomas, goaltender Michael Zador, four second-round draft picks (2009-12) and two third-round picks (2010-11).

Championships

Memorial Cup

CHL Champions

J. Ross Robertson Cup

OHL Champions

Hamilton Spectator Trophy

Most Points in Regular Season
  • 2003–04 - 110 points - 53-11-2-2
  • 2004–05 - 120 points - 59-7-2-0
  • 2005–06 - 102 points - 49-15-1-3
  • 2006–07 - 104 points - 50-14-1-3
Wayne Gretzky Trophy

Western Conference Champions
  • 1998–99
  • 2004–05
  • 2005–06


Emms Trophy

Emms Division Champions
  • 1977–78
  • 1989–90


Bumbacco Trophy

West Division Champions
  • 1997–98


Holody Trophy

Midwest Division Champions
  • 2003–04
  • 2004–05
  • 2005–06
  • 2006–07
  • 2008–09


Awards

Canadian Hockey League

CHL Player of the Year



Hap Emms Memorial Trophy

Outstanding Goaltender at the Memorial Cup

Stafford Smythe Memorial Trophy

Most Valuable Player at the Memorial Cup

Brian Kilrea Coach of the Year Award



CHL Executive of the Year

CHL Defenceman of the Year



CHL Humanitarian of the Year

  • 1997–98 - Jason Metcalfe


CHL Rookie of the Year



CHL Top Draft Prospect Award



CHL Top Scorer Award



Ontario Hockey League

Bobby Smith Trophy

Scholastic Player of the Year

Dan Snyder Memorial Trophy

Humanitarian of the Year
  • 1998 - Jason Metcalfe


Dave Pinkney Trophy

Lowest Team G.A.A.

Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy

Top Scorer

Emms Family Award

Rookie of the Year

F.W. "Dinty" Moore Trophy

Lowest G.A.A. among Rookie Goaltenders
  • 1976–77 - Barry Heard
  • 1989–90 - Sean Basilio
  • 2003–04 - Ryan MacDonald


Jack Ferguson Award

Top Draft Pick

Jim Mahon Memorial Trophy

Highest Scoring Right Winger
Matt Leyden Trophy

Coach of the Year

Max Kaminsky Trophy

Most Outstanding Defenseman

OHL Executive of the Year



OHL Goaltender of the Year



Red Tilson Trophy

Most Outstanding Player

Roger Neilson Memorial Award

Top Academic College/University Player
  • 2007–08 - Scott Aarssen


Wayne Gretzky 99 Award

Playoffs MVP

William Hanley Trophy

Most Sportsmanlike Player


Coaches

London Knights coaches have won the Matt Leyden Trophy, emblematic of the OHL's Coach of the Year, five times. Bill Long won it once, in 1976–77, Gary Agnew twice, in 1992–93 and in 1997–98, and Dale Hunter twice, in 2003–04 and 2004–05. Dale Hunter also won the Brian Kilrea Coach of the Year Award, emblematic of CHL Coach of the Year honours, in 2003–04. The team's current assistant coach is Pat Curcio. Former NHLer, Dave Gagner left the team during the summer of 2008 to accept a position with the Vancouver Canucks of the NHL.

As London Nationals:

As London Knights:

Notes: Mike Fedorko was entering his second season as Knights' coach and GM in the autumn of 1995. He was fired in October 1995 when the Knights began the season with a 13-game losing streak. Assistant Murray Nystrom took over coaching duties temporarily. Tom Barrett, who had led the Kitchener Rangers to the 1984 Memorial Cup, was named head coach in December. Barrett unfortunately died of cancer in April 1996, shortly after the conclusion of the season. Moe Mantha was originally named the head coach to take over from Barrett, but left to coach the Baltimore Bandits of the American Hockey League before coaching a game. Brad Selwood was ultimately named Barrett's replacement for 1996–97 but was fired mid-season and GM Paul McIntosh took over on an interim basis for the rest of the season. Gary Agnew was rehired at the start of 1997–98. [55806]

Players

Current roster

Goaltenders
Number Player Catches Position Acquired NHL rights Place of birth
29 Michael Houser L G Free Agent Eligible in 2010 Wexford, Pennsylvaniamarker
41 Michael Hutchinson L G Trade BAR in June 2009 BOS 2008 Barrie, Ontariomarker
Defencemen
Number Player Shoots Position Acquired NHL rights Place of birth
3 Reid McNeill L D Free Agent Eligible in 2010 London, Ontariomarker
6 Scott Harrington L D 2009 OHL Draft Eligible in 2011 Kingston, Ontariomarker
7 Matt Ashman L D 2006 OHL Draft Undrafted London, Ontariomarker
10 Steve Tarasuk R D Trade KIT 2008 Undrafted Thornhill, Ontariomarker
21 Kalle Ekelund L R 2009 CHL Import Draft Eligible in 2010 Nybromarker, Swedenmarker
51 Michael D'Orazio R D Trade OS in 2009 Undrafted Richmond Hill, Ontariomarker
52 Jake Worrad L D 2009 OHL Draft Eligible in 2011 Birr, Ontario
Forwards
Number Player Shoots Position Acquired NHL rights Place of birth
12 Pieter Schinkelshoek R RW Trade OTT in 2009 Eligible in 2010 London, Ontariomarker
16 Dominic DeSando L C 2006 OHL Draft Eligible in 2010 London, Ontariomarker
18 Tucker Hunter L C 2006 OHL Draft Undrafted London, Ontariomarker
20 Garett Hunter L LW 2006 OHL Draft Undrafted Oil Springs, Ontariomarker
26 Colin Martin L LW Trade SUD in Aug. 2008 Eligible in 2010 London, Ontariomarker
27 Michael MacDonald L C 2007 OHL Draft Eligible in 2010 Thunder Bay, Ontariomarker
55 Leigh Salters LW Trade GUE 2009 Undrafted London, Ontariomarker
71 Phil Varone L C Trade KIT 2008 SJ 2009 Vaughan, Ontariomarker
77 Zac Rinaldo LW Trade MIS 2009 PHI 2008 Mississauga, Ontariomarker
90 Philip McRae L C 2006 OHL Draft STL 2008 Minneapolis, Minnesotamarker
91 Nazem Kadri L C Trade KIT 2008 TOR 2009 London, Ontariomarker
92 Daniel Erlich R RW 2007 OHL Draft Undrafted Thornhill, Ontariomarker
93 Justin Taylor L C Trade KGN 2007 WAS 2007 London, Ontariomarker
97 Jared Knight R RW 2008 OHL Draft Eligible in 2010 Battle Creek, Michiganmarker


NHL/WHA alumni

The following is a complete list of London Knights who later played in the National Hockey League or World Hockey Association.
London Nationals


London Knights


First-rounders in NHL/WHA entry draft

The London Knights have produced more first overall selections in the NHL Entry Draft (5) than any other team in the world. The Knights also produced one first overall selection in the 1977 WHA Amateur Draft. London is also ranked third (behind Peterborough and Oshawa) on the all-time list of number of players drafted by the NHL, with 142 as of 2007.1

The following players were selected in the first round of the NHL entry draft:

Darryl Sittler 1970 8th overall by the Toronto Maple Leafs

Dan Maloney 1970 14th overall by the Chicago Blackhawks

Dennis Ververgaert 1973 3rd overall by the Vancouver Canucks

Rick Green 1976 1st overall by the Washington Capitals

Scott Campbell 1977 9th overall by the St. Louis Blues

Brad Marsh 1978 11th overall by the Calgary Flames

Rob Ramage 1979 1st overall by the Colorado Rockies

Jim Sandlak 1985 4th overall by the Vancouver Canucks

Brendan Shanahan 1987 2nd overall by the New Jersey Devils

Nick Stajduhar 1993 16th overall by the Edmonton Oilers

Jason Allison 1993 17th overall by the Washington Capitals

Rico Fata 1998 6th overall by the Calgary Flames

Rick Nash 2002 1st overall by the Columbus Blue Jackets

Corey Perry 2003 28th overall by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim

Rob Schremp 2004 25th overall by the Edmonton Oilers

Patrick Kane 2007 1st overall by the Chicago Blackhawks

Sam Gagner 2007 6th overall by the Edmonton Oilers

John Tavares 2009 1st overall by the New York Islanders

Nazem Kadri 2009 7th overall by the Toronto Maple Leafs

The following players were selected in the first round of the WHA amateur draft:

Reg Thomas 1973 8th overall by the Los Angeles Sharks

Rick Green 1976 10th overall by the Quebec Nordiques

Scott Campbell 1977 1st overall by the Houston Aeros

Retired numbers

5 - Rob Ramage

8 - Dino Ciccarelli

9 - Darryl Sittler

19 - Brendan Shanahan

22 - Brad Marsh

Hall of Famers



300 point club

The following players recorded a minimum of 300 career points in a Knights' uniform:

Note: GP = Games Played, G = Goals, A = Assists, Pts = Points
Player POS GP G A Pts Seasons NHL
Corey Perry RW 253 140 240 380 2001–05 ANH

Chris Taylor C 259 150 228 378 1988–92 NYI, BOS, BUF

Brian Bradley C 210 138 235 373 1981–85 CGY, VAN, TOR, TB

Dennis Maruk F 193 159 211 370 1972–75 CAL, CLE, MIN, WAS

Dylan Hunter LW 315 106 263 369 2001–06 None

Dennis Ververgaert F 187 141 210 351 1970–73 VAN, PHI, WAS

Dino Ciccarelli RW 226 169 177 346 1976–80 MIN, WAS, DET, TB, FLA

Jason Allison C 202 123 202 325 1991–95 WAS, BOS, LA, TOR

Dave Simpson F 204 130 189 3191 1977–82 None

Scott Morrison F 203 116 200 316 1981–84 None

Reg Thomas C 180 136 173 309 1970–73 QUE; LA, MICH, IND, CIN (WHA)
Rob Schremp C 179 126 178 304 2003–06 EDM, NYI

1 Dave Simpson recorded the best single season in Knights' history, when he scored 155 points in 1981–82.


Team records

Team records for a single season
Statistic Total Season
Most points 120 2004–05
Most wins 59 2004–05
Most goals for 380 1983–84
Least goals for 179 1995–96
Least goals against 125 2004–05
Most goals against 435 1995–96


Individual player records for a single season
Statistic Player Total Season
Most goals Dino Ciccarelli 72 1977–78
Most assists Sergei Kostitsyn 91 2006–07
Most points Dave Simpson 155 1981–82
Most points, rookie Patrick Kane 145 2006–07
Most points, defenseman Chris McCauley 114 1981–82
Best GAA (goalie) Gerald Coleman 1.70 2004–05
Goalies = minimum 1500 minutes played



Season-by-season results

Regular season

  • 1965 to 1968 as London Nationals
  • 1968 to Present as London Knights


Legend: OTL = Overtime loss, SL = Shoot Out Loss

Season Games Won Lost Tied OTL SL Points Pct % Goals
for
Goals
against
Standing
1965–66 48 12 29 7 - - 31 0.323 149 235 9th OHA
1966–67 48 18 21 9 - - 45 0.469 185 214 6th OHA
1967–68 54 17 31 6 - - 40 0.370 177 262 7th OHA
1968–69 54 19 26 9 - - 47 0.435 242 258 7th OHA
1969–70 54 22 25 7 - - 51 0.472 209 238 6th OHA
1970–71 62 19 35 8 - - 46 0.371 232 281 8th OHA
1971–72 63 23 31 9 - - 55 0.437 253 285 8th OHA
1972–73 63 33 22 8 - - 74 0.587 334 246 4th OHA
1973–74 70 36 27 7 - - 79 0.564 282 250 4th OHA
1974–75 70 26 37 7 - - 59 0.421 296 368 9th OHA
1975–76 66 31 26 9 - - 71 0.538 317 256 2nd Emms
1976–77 66 51 13 2 - - 104 0.788 379 203 2nd Emms
1977–78 68 35 22 11 - - 81 0.596 333 251 1st Emms
1978–79 68 37 29 2 - - 76 0.559 310 287 2nd Emms
1979–80 68 26 38 4 - - 56 0.412 328 334 5th Emms
1980–81 68 20 48 0 - - 40 0.294 300 388 6th Emms
1981–82 68 35 30 3 - - 73 0.537 359 328 3rd Emms
1982–83 70 32 37 1 - - 65 0.464 336 339 5th Emms
1983–84 70 32 37 1 - - 65 0.464 288 319 4th Emms
1984–85 66 43 22 1 - - 87 0.659 340 276 2nd Emms
1985–86 66 28 33 5 - - 61 0.462 271 292 6th Emms
1986–87 66 25 39 2 - - 52 0.394 259 329 7th Emms
1987–88 66 40 22 4 - - 84 0.636 309 273 2nd Emms
1988–89 66 37 25 4 - - 78 0.591 311 264 3rd Emms
1989–90 66 41 19 6 - - 88 0.667 313 246 1st Emms
1990–91 66 38 25 3 - - 79 0.598 301 270 3rd Emms
1991–92 66 37 25 4 - - 78 0.591 310 260 3rd Emms
1992–93 66 32 27 7 - - 71 0.538 323 292 3rd Emms
1993–94 66 32 30 4 - - 68 0.515 293 279 5th Emms
1994–95 66 18 44 4 - - 40 0.303 210 309 4th Western
1995–96 66 3 60 3 - - 9 0.068 179 435 5th Western
1996–97 66 13 51 2 - - 28 0.212 215 365 5th Western
1997–98 66 40 21 5 - - 85 0.644 301 238 1st Western
1998–99 68 34 30 4 - - 72 0.529 260 217 3rd West
1999–00 68 22 36 7 3 - 54 0.397 186 250 5th West
2000–01 68 26 34 5 3 - 60 0.441 222 263 4th West
2001–02 68 24 27 10 7 - 65 0.478 210 249 5th West
2002–03 68 31 27 7 3 - 72 0.529 220 205 2nd Midwest
2003–04 68 53 11 2 2 - 110 0.809 300 147 1st Midwest
2004–05 68 59 7 2 0 - 120 0.882 310 125 1st Midwest
2005–06 68 49 15 - 1 3 102 0.750 304 211 1st Midwest
2006–07 68 50 14 - 1 3 104 0.765 311 231 1st Midwest
2007–08 68 38 24 - 4 2 82 0.603 250 230 2nd Midwest
2008–09 68 49 16 - 1 2 101 0.743 287 194 1st Midwest
2009-10 Season in progress. See 2009-10 OHL season.


Playoffs

  • 1965–66 Out of playoffs.
  • 1966–67 Lost to Niagara Falls Flyers 8 points to 4 in quarterfinals.
  • 1967–68 Lost to Hamilton Red Wings 8 points to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 1968–69 Lost to Peterborough Petes 8 points to 4 in quarterfinals.
  • 1969–70 Defeated Peterborough Petes 8 points to 4 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Toronto Marlboros 9 points to 3 in semifinals.
  • 1970–71 Lost to Montreal Junior Canadiens 8 points to 0 in quarterfinals.
  • 1971–72 Lost to Ottawa 67's 8 points to 6 in quarterfinals.
  • 1972–73 Defeated Kitchener Rangers 8 points to 0 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Peterborough Petes 9 points to 5 in semifinals.
  • 1973–74 Lost to Toronto Marlboros 9 points to 1 in quarterfinals.
  • 1974–75 Out of playoffs.
  • 1975–76 Lost to Toronto Marlboros 8 points to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 1976–77 Defeated Toronto Marlboros 9 points to 3 in quarterfinals.
    Defeated St. Catharines Fincups 9 points to 7 in semifinals.
    Lost to Ottawa 67's 8 points to 4 in finals.

  • 1977–78 Defeated Kitchener Rangers 8 points to 0 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Hamilton Fincups 9 points to 5 in semifinals.
  • 1978–79 Defeated Windsor Spitfires in first round - series protested.


    Lost to Niagara Falls Flyers in round-robin.
  • 1979–80 Lost to Niagara Falls Flyers 6 points to 4 in first round.
  • 1980–81 Out of playoffs.
  • 1981–82 Lost to Brantford Alexanders 6 points to 2 in first round.
  • 1982–83 Lost to Brantford Alexanders 6 points to 0 in first round.
  • 1983–84 Defeated North Bay Centennials 6 points to 2 in first round.
    Lost to Kitchener Rangers 8 points to 0 in quarterfinals.
  • 1984–85 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 8 points to 0 in first round.
    Lost to Hamilton Steelhawks 6 points to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 1985–86 Lost to North Bay Centennials 9 points to 1 in first round.
  • 1986–87 Out of playoffs.
  • 1987–88 Defeated Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 2 in first round.
    Lost to Hamilton Steelhawks 4 games to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 1988–89 Defeated Guelph Platers 4 games to 3 in first round.
    Defeated North Bay Centennials 4 games to 3 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Niagara Falls Thunder 4 games to 3 in semifinals.

  • 1989–90 Lost to Niagara Falls Thunder 4 games to 2 in first round.
  • 1990–91 Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 3 in first round.
  • 1991–92 Defeated Owen Sound Platers 4 games to 1 in first round.
    Lost to Niagara Falls Thunder 4 games to 1 in quarterfinals.
  • 1992–93 Defeated Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 3 in first round.
    Lost to Detroit Jr. Red Wings 4 games to 1 in quarterfinals.
  • 1993–94 Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in first round.
  • 1994–95 Lost to Detroit Jr. Red Wings 4 games to 0 in first round.
  • 1995–96 Out of playoffs.
  • 1996–97 Out of playoffs.
  • 1997–98 Defeated Erie Otters 4 games to 3 in first round.
    Defeated Kingston Frontenacs 4 games to 1 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Ottawa 67's 4 games to 0 in semifinals.

  • 1998–99 Defeated Sarnia Sting 4 games to 2 in first round.
    Defeated Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 3 in quarterfinals.
    Defeated Owen Sound Platers 4 games to 1 in semifinals.
    Lost to Belleville Bulls 4 games to 3 in finals.


  • 1999–00 Out of playoffs.
  • 2000–01 Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 1 in first round.
  • 2001–02 Defeated Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 2 in first round.
    Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 2002–03 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 3 in first round.
    Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 2 in quarterfinals.
  • 2003–04 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 0 in first round.
    Defeated Erie Otters 4 games to 0 in quarterfinals.
    Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 3 in semifinals.

  • 2004–05 Defeated Guelph Storm 4 games to 0 in first round.
    Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 0 in quarterfinals.
    Defeated Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 1 in semifinals.
    Defeated Ottawa 67's 4 games to 1 in finals.





    OHL CHAMPIONS
    Finished Memorial Cup round-robin in first place.
    Defeated Rimouski Océanic 4-0 in the championship game.









    MEMORIAL CUP CHAMPIONS




  • 2005–06 Defeated Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 0 in first round.
    Defeated Owen Sound Attack 4 games to 2 in quarterfinals.
    Defeated Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in semifinals.




    Lost to Peterborough Petes 4 games to 0 in finals.


  • 2006–07 Defeated Owen Sound Attack 4 games to 0 in first round.
    Defeated Sault Ste.

    Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 3 in quarterfinals.


    Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 1 in semifinals.

  • 2007–08 Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 1 in first round.
  • 2008–09 Defeated Erie Otters 4 games to 1 in first round.
    Defeated Saginaw Spirit 4 games to 0 in quarterfinals.


    Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 1 in semifinals.



Uniforms and logos

"Spiderknight," 1994–2002.
As the London Nationals, the Knights originally played in the blue and white of the Toronto Maple Leafs. The team's logo was the same Leaf as used by the parent club at the time, except with the words "London Nationals" written out across the leaf instead of "Toronto Maple Leafs". After 1968, the colours changed to green, gold and white, and the logo to a classically-inspired Knight's head with an Old English "K" on the helmet. In 1980 the striping changed slightly, from classical horizontal stripes around the sleeves and bottom of the sweater to large arm stripes and a bare sweater bottom. In 1985–86 the green on the uniforms was darkened and the arm stripes were deleted in favour of broad swathes of secondary colour across the shoulders and down the arms. 1986 saw a total re-design of sweater and logo. Black was added as a secondary colour and the striping returned to a more pedestrian design. The logo was also changed, from a classical Knight's head to a more modernized version on a gold circle with the letter "L". These uniforms were used until 1994. In 1994 the green and gold were disposed of completely in favour of the eggplant and teal used by the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. The logo was changed to "Spiderknight", with normal horizontal striping and pointed shouder stripes. There was also a teal shoulder patch bearing the word "London" and a hockey stick. In February 2002, the Knights reverted back to their 1986–94 uniforms as a commemoration of the closing of the London Gardens. The special uniforms were identical except for two shoulder patches, one bearing the 1968–86 logo and the other bearing the 1994–2002 logo. These uniforms were also used for the 2002–03 preseason. For the opening of the John Labatt Centremarker in October 2002, the Knights debuted new uniforms with the 1986–94 logo, minus the "L" and the gold circle. These were drawn on a home white uniform and a road uniform that, for the first time in team history, bore black as its primary colour. Each uniform also bore a new "shield" shoulder patch. The team also debuted green third jerseys, which featured the word "KNIGHTS" printed diagonally across the front of the sweater.

Arenas

London Gardens / London Ice House, 1965–2002

  • Built : 1963
  • Capacity : 5,075 including standing room.
  • Ice Size : 190' x 85'
The London Gardens was built in 1963 and served as the home of the Knights from the team's inception in 1965 to its closing in 2002. The building was renamed London Ice House in 1994. The last meaningful game played at the arena was in the 2002 playoffs, where the Knights lost in overtime in the sixth game of the second round to the eventual OHL Champion Erie Otters. The last goal in the building was scored by Carlo Colaiacovo. The Knights used the Ice House for their training camp and exhibition schedule for the 2002–03 season and moved out permanently in October 2002. The arena is currently home to the Forest City Velodrome.
The John Labatt Centre.
The OHL Arena & Travel Guide - London Gardens

John Labatt Centre, 2002–present

  • Built : 2002
  • Capacity : 9,090 including standing room.
  • Ice Size : 200' x 85'
The John Labatt Centre marker opened on October 11, 2002 as the Knights played host to the Plymouth Whalers. The first goal in the building was scored by Dylan Hunter. The arena, located in downtown London, is the largest in Western Ontario. Tickets for the 2005–06 season in the building sold out in one day, and there is currently a cap on season tickets due to the team's popularity.

The OHL Arena & Travel Guide - John Labatt Centre


See also



External links




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