The Full Wiki

More info on Louisiana's 2nd congressional district

Louisiana's 2nd congressional district: Map

Advertisements
  
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



Louisiana's 2nd congressional district contains nearly all of the city of New Orleansmarker (a small portion being located in the neighboring ), and some of its suburbs, including the West Bank portion of Jefferson Parish and South Kenner. The seat is currently held by Republican Anh "Joseph" Cao.

History

Louisiana gained its second district in 1823 as part of the 18th United States Congress. At first comprising New Orleansmarker and significant populations from surrounding areas, it has incrementally been compacted into being a mostly within the city of New Orleans per se. It has also historically been among the most safely Democratic seats in the country; the Republicans had not held this seat since 1891, until Republican nominee Anh Joseph Cao upset Democratic incumbent William J. Jefferson in 2008 for the term to begin in January 2009. Like most Congressional seats in the South, this district consistently voted Democratic from the time of Reconstruction until the 1960s. Since then, its position as a virtually consistent Democratic seat is mostly due to its being one of the "Majority-Minority" districts created as a result of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, to ensure minority voters have a likely opportunity to elect representatives in Congress and to guard against adverse racially-motivated gerrymandering.

The 2008 election was rescheduled for December 6 because of Hurricane Gustav. Jefferson, weakened by an indictment on 16 felony counts, faced Republican candidate Anh "Joseph" Cao, Green candidate Malik Rahim, and Libertarian candidate Gregory Kahn. Jefferson was defeated by Cao.

With the swearing in of Joseph Cao in 2009, he became not only the first Republican to represent the 2nd district and most of New Orleans in over a century, but also America's first Vietnamese-American Congressman. He is the only Republican in the 111th Congress representing a predominantly African-American district. The district has the distinction being the most Democratic-leaning district in the country (according to the Cook Partisan Voting Index) be represented by a Republican.

Recent election results

2000

Party Candidate Votes %

Democratic Party William J. Jefferson unopposed


2002

Party Candidate Votes %

Democratic Party William J. Jefferson 90,310 64

Democratic Party Irma Muse Dixon 28,480 20

Republican Party Silky Sullivan 15,440 11

Democratic Party Clarence Hunt 4,137 3

Independent Wayne E. Clement 3,789 3


2004

Party Candidate Votes %

Democratic Party William J. Jefferson 173,510 79

Republican Party Art Schwertz 46,097 21


2006

Party Candidate Votes % Run-off Votes* Run-off %*

Democratic William J. Jefferson* 28,283 30% 51%

Democratic Karen Carter* 20,364 22% 49%

Democratic Derrick Shepherd 16,799 18%

Republican Joe Lavigne 12,511 13%

Democratic Troy Carter 11,304 12%

Republican Eric Bradley 1,159 1%

Democratic Regina Bartholomew 1,125 1%

Democratic John Edwards 675 1%

Democratic Scott Barron 621 1%

Libertarian Gregory Kahn 404 1%

Democratic Vinny Mendoza 402 0%

Republican Lance von Uhde 258 0%

Democratic Deven Collins 121 0%


*Jefferson and Carter advanced to run-off on December 9, with Jefferson winning reelection.

List of Representatives

Representative Party Term District home Notes
District created March 4, 1823

Henry Hosford Gurley Adams-Clay D-R March 4, 1823 - March 3, 1825 Baton Rougemarker
Adams March 4, 1825 - March 3, 1829
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 - March 3, 1831

Philemon Thomas Jacksonian March 4, 1831 - March 3, 1835 Baton Rougemarker

Eleazer Wheelock Ripley Jacksonian March 4, 1835 - March 3, 1837 Saint Francisvillemarker
Democratic March 4, 1837 - March 3, 1839
Thomas Withers Chinn Whig March 4, 1839 - March 3, 1841 Port Allenmarker

John Bennett Dawson Democratic March 4, 1841 - March 3, 1843 Saint Francisvillemarker Redistricted to the

Alcée Louis la Branche Democratic March 4, 1843 - March 3, 1845 La Nouvelle Orléansmarker
Bannon Goforth Thibodeaux Democratic March 4, 1845 - March 3, 1849 Thibodauxmarker

Charles Magill Conrad Whig March 4, 1849 - August 17, 1850 La Nouvelle Orléansmarker Resigned to become United States Secretary of War
Vacant August 17, 1850 - December 5, 1850
Henry Adams Bullard Whig December 5, 1850 - March 3, 1851 La Nouvelle Orléansmarker

Joseph Aristide Landry Whig March 4, 1851 - March 3, 1853 Donaldsonvillemarker

Theodore Gaillard Hunt Whig March 4, 1853 - March 3, 1855 La Nouvelle Orléansmarker

Miles Taylor Democratic March 4, 1855 - February 5, 1861 Belle Alliancemarker Withdrew due to onset of Civil War

Vacant February 5, 1861 - December 3, 1862
Michael Hahn Unionist December 3, 1862 - March 3, 1863 Saint Charles Parishmarker, Hahnvillemarker

Louisiana's secession from United States - Civil War 1862-1868
James Mann Democratic July 18, 1868 - August 26, 1868 New Orleansmarker Died after serving 5 weeks
Vacant August 26, 1868 - March 3, 1869 House left seat vacant due to election dispute
Lionel Allen Sheldon Republican March 4, 1869 - March 3, 1875 New Orleansmarker Lost re-election
Ezekiel John Ellis Democratic March 4, 1875 - March 3, 1885 Covingtonmarker, Amitemarker Retired from Congress, returned to law practice
Michael Hahn Republican March 3, 1885 - March 15, 1886 Saint Charles Parishmarker, Hahnvillemarker Died
Vacant March 15, 1886 - December 9, 1885
Nathaniel Dick Wallace Democratic December 9, 1886 - March 3, 1887 New Orleansmarker

Matthew Diamond Lagan Democratic March 4, 1887 - March 3, 1889 New Orleansmarker

Hamilton D. Coleman Republican March 4, 1889 - March 3, 1891 New Orleansmarker

Matthew Diamond Lagan Democratic March 4, 1891 - March 3, 1893 New Orleansmarker

Robert Charles Davey Democratic March 4, 1893 - March 3, 1895 New Orleansmarker

Charles Francis Buck Democratic March 4, 1895 - March 3, 1897 New Orleansmarker, Amitemarker

Robert Charles Davey Democratic March 4, 1897 - December 26, 1908 New Orleansmarker Died
Vacant December 26, 1908 - March 30, 1909
Samuel Louis Gilmore Democratic March 30, 1909- July 18, 1910 Abita Springsmarker Died
Vacant July 18, 1910 - November 8, 1910
Henry Garland Dupré Democratic November 8, 1910 - February 21, 1924 Opelousasmarker Died
Vacant February 21, 1924 - April 22, 1924
James Zacharie Spearing Democratic April 22, 1924 - March 3, 1931 New Orleansmarker

Paul H. Maloney Democratic March 4, 1931 - December 15, 1940 New Orleansmarker Resigned
Vacant December 15, 1940 - January 3, 1941
Hale Boggs Democratic January 3, 1941 - January 3, 1943 New Orleansmarker Lost re-nomination
Paul H. Maloney Democratic January 3, 1943 - January 3, 1947 New Orleansmarker Retired from Congress
Hale Boggs Democratic January 3, 1947 - January 3, 1973 New Orleansmarker Presumed dead after private plane went missing over Alaskamarker Oct. 16, 1972. Seat declared vacant at beginning of the 93rd Congress.
Vacant January 3, 1973 – March 20, 1973
Corinne C. "Lindy" Boggs Democratic March 20, 1973 – January 3, 1991 New Orleansmarker Retired
William J. Jefferson Democratic January 3, 1991 – January 3, 2009 New Orleansmarker Lost re-election
Joseph Cao Republican January 3, 2009 - Present New Orleansmarker Incumbent


References

  1. Political Graveyard
  2. "Congressman-Elect Anh 'Joseph' Cao Vows to Work with Everyone to Rebuild the 2nd District" by Michelle Krupa in the Times-Picayune (accessed 2008 December 7).



Embed code: at The Full Wiki'>
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message