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Mains power around the world: Map

  
  

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This article includes a 'list of countries and territories, with the plugs, voltages and frequencies they use for providing electrical power to small appliances and some major appliances. For definitions of terms and further information on each plug, see the article AC power plugs and sockets. For a discussion of the different voltages and frequencies used and some of the history of the different power systems see Mains electricity.


Wall sockets

Plugs.
The lettering system used here is from a U.S. government document, which defines the letter names and gives a (not always correct) list of what plug types are used where. Although useful for quick reference, the document is ambiguous in some areas. A plug and socket that are classified here under the same letter will usually mate, but there is no guarantee of this. A more up-to-date and authoritative reference on plugs and sockets is IEC Technical Report 60083.

Voltage ranges

[[Image:WorldMap Voltage&Frequency.png|right|thumb|310px|Voltage and frequency:

]]


Distinction should be made between the voltage at the point of supply (nominal system voltage) and the voltage rating of the equipment (utilization voltage). Typically the utilization voltage is 3 to 5% lower than the nominal system voltage; for example, a nominal 208 V supply system will be connected to motors with "200 V" on their nameplates. This allows for the voltage drop between equipment and supply. Voltages in this article are the nominal single-phase supply voltages and equipment used on these systems will carry slightly lower nameplate voltages. Three-phase and industrial loads will have other voltages.

Table of mains voltages and frequencies

Note: The table can be sorted alphabetically or numerically using the icon.

Region Type of plug / socket Voltage Frequency Comments
Afghanistanmarker C, D, F 240 V 50 Hz Voltage may vary from 160 to 280.
Albaniamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Algeriamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
American Samoamarker A, B, F, I 120 V 60 Hz
Andorramarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Angolamarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Anguillamarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Antiguamarker A, B 230 V 60 Hz Airport power is reportedly 110 V.
Argentinamarker C, I 220 V 50 Hz Live and neutral are reversed for socket outlet type I in comparison to most other countries.
Armeniamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Arubamarker A, B, F 127 V 60 Hz Lago Colony 115 V.
Australia I 230 V 50 Hz As of 2000, the mains supply voltage specified in AS 60038 is 230 V with a tolerance of +10% -6%. This was done for voltage harmonisation - however 240 V is within tolerance and is commonly found. Mains voltage is still popularly referred to as being "two-forty volts". Bathrooms in hotels will often have a type I, C and A socket marked "for shavers only" as pictured on the right.
Austriamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Azerbaijanmarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Azores C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Bahamasmarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz along with 50 Hz in some outlying areas
Bahrainmarker G 230 V 50 Hz Awali 110 V, 60 Hz.
Balearic Islandsmarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Bangladeshmarker A, C, D, G, K 220 V 50 Hz
Barbadosmarker A, B 115 V 50 Hz
Belarusmarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Belgiummarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Belizemarker A, B, G 110 V
and
220 V

60 Hz
Beninmarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Bermudamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Bhutanmarker D, F, G, M 230 V 50 Hz
Boliviamarker A, C 220 V 50 Hz La Paz & Viacha 115 V.
Bonairemarker 127 V 50 Hz Receptacle is combination of B&C without ground connector.
Bosniamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Botswanamarker D, G, M 231 V 50 Hz
Brazilmarker A, B, C, I 127 V
and
220 V

60 Hz Type I is becoming common for 220 V outlets and appliances in 127 V areas. Dual-voltage wiring is rather common for high-powered appliances, such as clothes dryers and electric showers which tend to be 220 V even in 127 V areas. Depending on the area, the exact voltage might be 115 V, 127 V, or 220 V. The A, B and C types are sometimes together (flat with rounder ends and ground pin) so that an A, B or C types can be used. Also note that by 2009, Brazil will be converting to the IEC 60906-1 international plug which looks similar to type J but is not compatible.
Bruneimarker G 240 V 50 Hz
Bulgariamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Burkina Fasomarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Burundimarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Cambodiamarker A, C, G 230 V 50 Hz
Cameroonmarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Canadamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz Standardized at 120 V. 240 V used for applications such as clothes driers, air conditioning, electric cook-stoves and machinery. Buildings with more than one branch circuit must have both voltages. Type A outlets are for repairs only, type B now required for new construction and renovation. A 20-Amp type B but with a T-slot is used in kitchens in new construction.
Canary Islandsmarker C, E, F, L 220 V 50 Hz
Cape Verdemarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Cayman Islandsmarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Central African Republicmarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Chadmarker D, E, F 220 V 50 Hz
Channel Islands C, G 230 V 50 Hz
Chilemarker C, L 220 V 50 Hz
Chinamarker (mainland only) A, C, I 220 V 50 Hz Most wall outlets simultaneously support Types A and I. Some outlets support both Type A and Type C (the holes in the outlets are flat in the middle and round on the sides) so that either a Type A or a Type C plug can be used. The Type I outlet is next to the Type A & C outlet. Type A outlets only fit plugs with pins of the same width—a polarized Type A plug requires an adapter. NOTE: no matter the type of plug the socket will accept, voltage in china is always 220 volts. See photo at right.
Colombiamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz High-power air conditioners, restaurant equipment, cookstoves and ovens use 240 volt supplies. Wiring conventions, practices and standards follow the Colombian Electrical Code (Codigo Electrico Colombiano) which is essentially a translation of the USA National Electric Code.
Comorosmarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Congo-Brazzavillemarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Congo-Kinshasamarker C, D 220 V 50 Hz
Cook Islandsmarker I 240 V 50 Hz
Costa Ricamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Côte d'Ivoiremarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Croatiamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz 3-phase 400 V AC used for heavy duty applications.
Cubamarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Cyprusmarker G 240 V 50 Hz
Czech Republicmarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz Type C Plugs are common, especially for low-power devices. Type C wall sockets are very uncommon, and exist only in very old installations.
Denmarkmarker C, E, K 230 V 50 Hz Type E is added from July 2008.
Djiboutimarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Dominicamarker D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Dominican Republicmarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
East Timormarker C, E, F, I 220 V 50 Hz
Ecuadormarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Egyptmarker C 220 V 50 Hz
El Salvadormarker A, B 115 V 60 Hz
Equatorial Guineamarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Eritreamarker C 230 V 50 Hz
Estoniamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Ethiopiamarker C, E, F, L 220 V 50 Hz
Faroe Islandsmarker C, K 220 V 50 Hz
Falkland Islandsmarker G 240 V 50 Hz
Fijimarker I 240 V 50 Hz
Finlandmarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Francemarker C, E 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz Type C wall sockets have been prohibited in new installations for more than 10 years.
French Guianamarker C, D, E 220 V 50 Hz
Gaza Stripmarker C, H 230 V 50 Hz (see Israel in this list)
Gabonmarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Gambiamarker G 230 V 50 Hz
Georgiamarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Germanymarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz Type F ("Schuko", short for "Schutzkontakt") is standard. Type C Plugs are common, especially for low-power devices. Type C wall sockets are very uncommon, and exist only in very old installations.
Ghanamarker D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Gibraltarmarker G, K 240 V 50 Hz Type K was used in the Europort development by the Danish builders. Otherwise the United Kingdom fittings are used.
Greecemarker C, F, (D seen in very old installs) 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz Type F ("Schuko", ) is the de-facto standard for new installations' sockets. Type C sockets exist only in old installations. Light appliances use type C plug while more electricity-consuming ones use type E&F or F plugs.
Greenlandmarker C, K 220 V 50 Hz
Grenadamarker G 230 V 50 Hz
Guadeloupemarker C, D, E 230 V 50 Hz
Guammarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Guatemalamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Guineamarker C, F, K 220 V 50 Hz
Guinea-Bissaumarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Guyanamarker A, B, D, G 240 V 60 Hz Mixture of 50 Hz and 60 Hz distribution according to Guyana Power and Light Conversion of 50 Hz distribution to 60 Hz is ongoing
Haitimarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Hondurasmarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Hong Kongmarker G is used in almost all products, while M is (rarely) used when required current rating is between 13~15A. D is now obsolete in Hong Kong. 220 V 50 Hz Largely based on UK system. Occasionally, a 'shaver' socket (similar to Type C) is found in some bathrooms that provides low current to some other plug types. These almost always have a 110 V socket and a 220 V socket in the same unit, or a switch to select voltage, which are sometimes labelled as 110 V and 220 V. This duo installation is not as common in HK as in the UK. There was a smaller 2A version of type D, now obsolete.
Hungarymarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220V) 50 Hz
Icelandmarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Indiamarker C, D, M 220 V 50 Hz The standardardised voltage used in India is 220V/50 Hz with a tolerance varying from 216V to 253V. Some hotels provide dual receptacles for foreign appliances giving both 120V and 230V.
Indonesiamarker C, F, G 127 V
and
230 V

50 Hz Type G socket/plug is less common.
Iranmarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz Type C wall sockets are less common, and exist only in older installations. Type F is used for new installations. Type C Plugs are common for low-power devices.
Iraqmarker C, D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Irelandmarker G (obsolete or specialist installations may be D and M (as in the UK) or F) 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz G Sockets and plugs standard as defined by NSAI I.S. 401 (Plug) I.S. 411 (Socket outlet). Type F ("Side Earth") plugs occasionally seen in old installations probably because much of the early Irish electrical network was heavily influenced by Siemens. ' A 'shaver' socket (similar to Type C) is sometimes found in bathrooms that will provide low current to some other plug types. These almost always have a 110 V socket and a 230 V socket in the same unit, or a switch to select voltage, which are sometimes labelled as 115 V and 230 V. The G type socket often has a on-off switch on the socket. 110 V centre point earthed transformers are often used for industrial portable tools.
Isle of Manmarker C, G 240 V 50 Hz
Israelmarker C, H, M 230 V 50 Hz The standard for H plugs and sockets was recently modified to use round pins, so most modern sockets accept both type C and type H plugs. Type M sockets are used for air conditioners. Identical plugs and sockets also used in the Palestinian National Authority areas.
Italymarker C, F, L 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz
Jamaicamarker A, B 110 V and 220V 50 Hz
Japanmarker A, B 100 V 50 Hz
and
60 Hz

Eastern Japan 50 Hz (Tokyomarker, Kawasaki, Sapporo, Yokohama, and Sendai); Western Japan 60 Hz (Okinawamarker, Osaka, Kyoto, Kobe, Nagoya, Hiroshima). Older buildings have nonpolarized sockets, in which case American polarized plugs (one prong wider than the other) would not fit. Many buildings do not have the ground pin. Sockets and switches fit in American-sized standard boxes.
Jordanmarker B, C, D, F, G, J 230 V 50 Hz
Kazakhstanmarker C, E, F 220 V 50 Hz No official standard. Voltage tolerance is 220 V ±10%. Actual voltage may vary (usually 150-200 V) because of unstable electrical system.
Kenyamarker G 240 V 50 Hz
Kiribatimarker I 240 V 50 Hz
Kuwaitmarker C, G 240 V 50 Hz
Kyrgyzstanmarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Laosmarker A, B, C, E, F 230 V 50 Hz
Latviamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Lebanonmarker A, B, C, D, G 240 V 50 Hz
Lesothomarker M 220 V 50 Hz
Liberiamarker A, B, C, E, F 120 V
and
240 V

50 Hz Previously 60 Hz, now officially 50 Hz. Many private power plants are still 60 Hz. A & B are used for 110v; C & F are used for 230/240v. Much of the centralized power system was destroyed during the civil wars starting in 1990, and public power supplies are still limited. Local supplies may vary and may not match the usual voltage for a particular wall socket.
Libyamarker D, L 127 V 50 Hz Barce, Benghazi, Derna, Sebha & Tobruk 230 V.
Lithuaniamarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz
Liechtensteinmarker C, J 230 V 50 Hz Swiss Norm, C only in the form CEE 7/16.
Luxembourgmarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz
Macau S.A.R.marker of Chinamarker D, M, G, a small number of F 220 V 50 Hz No official standards there. However, in the Macao-HK Ferry Pier built by Portuguese Government before handover the standard was E & F. After handover, Macau adopted G in both government and private buildings. Before 1980s, 110V was found in Macau but now obsolete.
Macedoniamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Madagascarmarker C, D, E, J, K 127 V
and
220 V

50 Hz
Madeiramarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Malawimarker G 230 V 50 Hz
Malaysiamarker G (but M for air conditioners and clothes dryers) 240 V 50 Hz The official mains power voltage is AC 230 V with the tolerance of +10%,-6%. However, the supplied voltage remains at 240 V (except Penangmarker at 230 V), as the supplied voltage is within the allowed tolerance. Type C plugs are very common with audio/video equipment. Plugged into Type G outlets using widely-available adapters or forced in by pushing down the shutter. The latter is widely practised, although hazardous.
Maldivesmarker A, D, G, J, K, L 230 V 50 Hz
Malimarker C, E 220 V 50 Hz
Maltamarker G 230 V 50 Hz
Martiniquemarker C, D, E 220 V 50 Hz
Mauritaniamarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Mauritiusmarker C, G 230 V 50 Hz
Mexicomarker A, B 127 V 60 Hz Type B is becoming more common. Voltage can legally vary by +/- 10% (giving a range of 114 to 140 volts). Split phase is commonly available and local electricians are apt to wire both to a type A/B socket to give 240 V for air conditioning or washing machine/dryers.
Micronesiamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Moldovamarker C, F 220-230 V 50 Hz Compatible with European and former Soviet Union (GOST) standards.
Monacomarker C, D, E, F 127 V
and
220 V

50 Hz
Mongoliamarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Montenegromarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Montserratmarker (Leeward Is.) A, B 230 V 60 Hz
Moroccomarker C, E 127 V
and
220 V

50 Hz Conversion to 220 V only underway.
Mozambiquemarker C, F, M 220 V 50 Hz Type M found especially near the border with South Africa, including in the capital, Maputomarker.
Myanmarmarker/Burmamarker C, D, F, G 230 V 50 Hz Type G found primarily in better hotels. Also, many major hotels chains are said to have outlets that will take Type I plugs and perhaps other types.
Namibiamarker D, M 220 V 50 Hz
Nauru I 240 V 50 Hz
Nepalmarker C, D, M 230 V 50 Hz
Netherlandsmarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz
Netherlands Antillesmarker A, B, F 127 V
and
220 V

50 Hz St. Martinmarker 120 V, 60 Hz; Saba & St. Eustatiusmarker 110 V, 60 Hz, A, maybe B
New Caledoniamarker E 220 V 50 Hz
New Zealandmarker I 230 V 50 Hz Electricity Regulations 1997 states supply voltage is 230 V ±6%
Nicaraguamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Nigermarker A, B, C, D, E, F 220 V 50 Hz
Nigeriamarker D, G 240 V 50 Hz
North Koreamarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Norwaymarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz IT earthing system (most widespread)

TN earthing system (new installations)

TT earthing system (used in some installations in Bergenmarker)
Okinawamarker A, B 100 V 60 Hz Military facilities 120 V.
Omanmarker C, G 240 V 50 Hz Voltage variations common.
Pakistanmarker C, D, M, G 230 V 50 Hz Official standard is 230 V / 50 Hz. Voltage tolerance is 230 V ±5% (218 V to 242 V). Frequency tolerance 50 Hz ±2% (49 Hz to 51 Hz) But Karachi Electric Supply Corporation (KESC) is 240 V / 50 Hz.
Type C and D Plug / Socket are common for low-power devices.

Type M Plug / Socket is common for air conditioners and high-power devices.

Type G Plug / Socket is less common.
Panamamarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz Panama City 120 V.
Papua New Guineamarker I 240 V 50 Hz
Paraguaymarker C 220 V 50 Hz
Perumarker A, B, C 220 V 60 Hz Talaramarker 110/220 V; Arequipamarker 50 Hz
Philippinesmarker A, B, C 220 V 60 Hz Most plugs and outlets are Type A, but some are C. Type B are commonly found in high powered appliances and computers. Sockets and switches are built to USA dimensions and fit USA sized wall boxes. Some areas have 110V as in Baguio.
Polandmarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Portugalmarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Puerto Rico A, B 120 V 60 Hz
Qatarmarker D, G 240 V 50 Hz
Réunionmarker E 220 V 50 Hz
Romaniamarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz Virtually identical to German standards. Most household sockets still compatible with East European standards (4.0 mm pins). Industrial appliances (washing machines, welding equipment) use 3-phase 400V AC supply.
Russian Federationmarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz USSR (along with much of Eastern Europe) used type GOST sockets with 4.0 mm pins instead of the 4.8mm standard used by West European type C/E/F Plugs. The former Soviet sockets could be seen mainly in old houses and in countryside. Obsolete standard 127 V/50 Hz AC is used in some remote villages. Elsewhere it was replaced in 1970s by the 220V standard. Industrial appliances use 3-phase 380V AC supply.
Rwandamarker C, J 230 V 50 Hz
St. Kitts and Nevismarker A, B, D, G 110 V
and
230 V

60 Hz Region plug is same as United States (2 pin) 110-120 V
St. Luciamarker (Winward Is.) G 240 V 50 Hz
St. Vincentmarker (Winward Is.) A, C, E, G, I, K 230 V 50 Hz
São Tomé and Príncipemarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Saudi Arabiamarker A, B, F, G 127 V
and
220 V

60 Hz
Senegalmarker C, D, E, K 230 V 50 Hz
Serbiamarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
Seychellesmarker G 240 V 50 Hz
Sierra Leonemarker D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Singaporemarker G (but M for air conditioners and clothes dryers) 230 V 50 Hz Type C are used for audio/video equipment and plug adapters are widely available.
Slovakiamarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Sloveniamarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz 3-phase 400 V AC used for heavy duty applications.
Somaliamarker C 220 V 50 Hz
South Africa M 220 V 50 Hz Grahamstown & Port Elizabeth 250 V; also found in King Williams Town
South Koreamarker A, B, C, F (Types A & B are used for 110-volt installations and/or found in very old buildings. Types C & F are used for 220 Volts.) 220 V 60 Hz Type F is normally found in offices, airports, hotels and some upscale homes; while Type C (type CEE 7/17) is the norm in most households. 220 volt power is distributed by using both "live" poles of a 110 volt system (neutral is not used). 110 V/60 Hz power with plugs A & B (under Japanese colonial influence) was previously used but has already been phased out. Some residents install their own step-down transformers and dedicated circuits, so that they can use 110 V appliances imported from Japan or North America. Most hotels only have 220 V outlets, but some hotels offer both 110 V (Type A or B) and 220 V (Type C or F) outlets. Switches and outlets fit American-sized boxes.
Spainmarker C, F 230 V (formerly 220v) 50 Hz
Sri Lankamarker D, M, G 230 V 50 Hz Increased use of type G in new houses/establishments. Mainly in Colombo and high end hotels.
Sudanmarker C, D 230 V 50 Hz
Surinamemarker C, F 127 V 60 Hz
Swazilandmarker M 230 V 50 Hz
Swedenmarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz Sockets lacking earth is prohibited in new installations.
Switzerlandmarker C, J 230 V 50 Hz C only in the form CEE 7/16.
Syriamarker C, E, L 220 V 50 Hz
Tahitimarker A, B, E 110 V
and
220 V

60 Hz/50 Hz Marquesas Islandsmarker 50 Hz
Taiwanmarker A, B 110 V 60 Hz Most outlets are Type A. When an outlet is Type B, the ground (earth) holes are usually not connected to anything in older houses. However, in modern houses you'll find them to be properly grounded. Most appliances have Type A plugs, but some appliances have Type B plugs. The ground prong on the Type B plus is often cut off to make it fit in Type A sockets in older buildings. Sockets and switches are built to USA dimensions and fit USA sized wall boxes. Dedicated sockets provide 220V for air conditioning units.
Tajikistanmarker C, I 220 V 50 Hz
Tanzania D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Thailandmarker A, B, C, F 220 V 50 Hz Outlets in hotels and newer buildings are usually a combination of types B and C which will accept plug types A, B and C while outlets in older buildings are usually type A. An equal proportion of appliances have type A or C plugs, or B if an Earth connection is required. Type F is mainly for high-powered appliances such as air conditioners, kettles and cookers. A 3-pin plug that only fits in B/C sockets is also seeing increased use, it differs from type B by having all the pins round.
Togomarker C 220 V 50 Hz Lome 127 V.
Tongamarker I 240 V 50 Hz
Trinidad & Tobagomarker A, B 115 V 60 Hz
Tunisiamarker C, E 230 V 50 Hz
Turkeymarker C, F 230 V 50 Hz
Turkmenistanmarker B, F 220 V 50 Hz
Uganda G 240 V 50 Hz
Ukrainemarker C, F 220 V 50 Hz
United Arab Emiratesmarker C, D, G 220 V 50 Hz
United Kingdommarker G (D and M seen in very old installs and specialist applications) 230 V (formerly 240 V) 50 Hz Voltage tolerance of 230 V +10%/−6% (216.2 V to 253 V), widened to 230 V ±10% (207 V to 253 V) in 2008. The system supply voltage remains centered on 240 V. A "shaver socket" (similar to Type C) is sometimes found in bathrooms that will provide low current to some other plug types. These sometimes have a ~110 V socket and a ~240 V socket in the same unit, or a switch to select voltage for a single socket. The G type socket usually has an on-off switch. IEC 60309 plugs and connectors are used in industrial and construction locations as well as for outdoor use in domestic and other business premises. Plug types D and M were used until the 1960s and are still in preferred use for theatre and TV stage lighting applications due to lack of internal fuse.
United States of Americamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz Standardized at 120 V. Electricity suppliers aim to keep most customers supplied between 114 and 126 V most of the time. 240 V/60 Hz used for heavy duty applications such as air conditioners, clothes dryers, stoves, ovens, and water heaters. Buildings with more than two branch circuits will have both 120 and 240 V available. Since 1962, Type B outlets are required by code in new construction and renovation. A T-slot Type B is rated for 20 amperes for use in kitchens or other areas using large 120 V appliances.
Uruguaymarker C, F, I, L 230 V (formerly 220 V) 50 Hz Type F becoming more common as a result of computer use. Neutral and live wires are reversed, as in Argentina.
Uzbekistanmarker C, I 220 V 50 Hz
Vanuatumarker I 230 V 50 Hz
Venezuelamarker A, B 120 V 60 Hz Type G found in household 220V service only for air conditioning and some high power appliances.
Vietnammarker A, C 220 V 50 Hz Type A is the norm in Southern Vietnam and Type C is the norm in Northern Vietnam (according to the pre-unification border at 17 degrees North). Type G is found only in some new luxury hotels, primarily those built by Singaporean and Hong Kong developers. But Type G is never found in homes, shops, or offices.
Virgin Islands A, B 110 V 60 Hz
Western Samoamarker I 230 V 50 Hz
Yemenmarker A, D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Zambiamarker C, D, G 230 V 50 Hz
Zimbabwemarker D, G 220 V 50 Hz
A (NEMA 1-15 USA 2 pin)
B (NEMA 5-15 USA 3 pin)


C (CEE 7/16)
C (CEE 7/17 Euro 2 pin)
D (BS546 5 A version of Type M )
E (French)
F (CEE 7/4 "Schuko")
E+F (CEE 7/7)
G (BS1363 Fused 13 A)
H (SI 32 Israel)
I (AS-3112 Argentina / Australia / New Zealand)
I, plus sockets for A, C and I (China)
J (SEV-1011 Switzerland)
K (SRAF 1962/DB Denmark)
L (CEI 23-16 Italy)
M (15 A version of Type D BS546)


References

  1. Electric current abroad
  2. IEC/TR 60083: Plugs and socket-outlets for domestic and similar general use standardized in member countries of IEC. International Electrotechnical Commission, May 2004. This 359-page technical report describes all national standards for domestic plugs and sockets. Its 1963 predecessor, CEE Publication 7, covered only the plugs and sockets of continental Europe.
  3. AS60038-2000 Standards Australia - Standard Voltages
  4. Rick Gilmour et al., editor, Canadian Electrical Code Part I, Twentieth Edition, C22.1-06 Safety Standard for Electrical Installations, Canadian Standards Association, Toronto, Ontario Canada (2002) ISBN 1-55436-023-4, diagram 1 and rule 26-700
  5. Danish Safety Technology Authority (Sikkerhedsstyrelsen)
  6. http://www.gplinc.com/?q=our_history History of Guyana Power and Light, retrieved 2009 July 31
  7. http://www.stabroeknews.com/2009/news/local/07/10/gpl-converting-parts-of-city-to-60-hz/ GPL Converting Parts of the City to 60 Hz, retrieved 2009 July 31
  8. Enel
  9. Guidelines For Electrical Wiring In Residential Buildings - Energy Commission of Malaysia.
  10. Ministérios da Indústria e Energia e do Equipamento Social - Decreto Regulamentar n.º 90/84
  11. http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/electricity.htm#plugs_f Electricity around the world
  12. http://www.leoni-electrical-appliances.com/Plugs.6775.0.html?&L=1&cHash=1109b26519&mode=DETAILS&cpid=2071&uid=261
  13. Lighting Industry Federation Ltd (2001) LIF Technical Statement No. 15,European Voltage Harmonisation. Accessed 2008-08-20


See also





External links




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