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Munkustrap is a Jellicle cat, named in T. S. Eliot's poem "The Naming of Cats". He is a principal character in Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical Cats.

The Musical

In the show, Munkustrap functions as a narrator, singing several songs and introducing many of the other cats. He is also the protector and second in command of the cats, after patriarch Old Deuteronomy; and directs them in the "Aweful Battle of the Pekes and Pollicles". As the defender of the tribe, Munkustrap fights Macavity. He and Demeter are usually portrayed as mates, although he has also been portrayed as the mate of Cassandra or Jennyanydots. Usually it is said that Jemima/Sillabub is the daughter of Munkustrap and Demeter. Because they both sing 'Old Deuteronomy', it is also speculated that he and Rum Tum Tugger are the sons of Old Deuteronomy, Munkustrap the elder son.

He is usually depicted onstage as a tall, silver tabby cat. Although Munkustrap does perform a substantial amount of dancing in Cats, the role requires strong singing and acting as well.

Cast

Actors who have portrayed Munkustrap have included Harry Groener, Bryan Batt, John Partridge, Jack Rebaldi, Rob Marshall and Jeffry Denman. In the German-speaking world premiere of Cats, Steve Barton played the role of Munkustrap/Dance Captain in the Theater an der Wien, Dean Maynard in the 25th anniversary tour. Michael Gruber, an alumnus of the Broadwaymarker production, was chosen to play Munkustrap in the 1998 Cats movie. Yannick Vezina portrayed the role in the Quebec City premiere of the show. In the 2006-2008 UK tour which also travelled to Portugal and Italy, Dean Maynard played Munkustrap. In the recent German tour, Matthew Goodgame played the lead role of Munkustrap.

References



  • Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats, T. S. Eliot, Harcourt, 1982, ISBN 0-15-168656-4
  • A Cat's Diary: How the Broadway Production of Cats was born, Stephen Hanan, Smith & Kraus, 2002, ISBN 1-57525-281-3



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