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Palace Theatre at night.


The Palace Theatre is a 2,827-seat restored movie palace located at 34 W. Broad Street in Columbus Ohiomarker. It was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and was built in 1926 as a part of the LeVeque Towermarker. Today the theater functions as a multi-use performing arts venue. It is owned and operated by CAPA .

History

The Palace Theatre was designed by Thomas W. Lamb in his signature "Adam" style, reminiscent of the 18th century neo-classical work of the Scottish architects James and Robert Adam. The construction of the theater was personally supervised by vaudeville mogul Edward Albee of the Keith-Albee circuit. It opened in 1926 as the Keith-Albee Palace and featured live vaudeville along with silent feature films, an orchestra and a Wurlitzer theater organ.

The dressing room tower in the backstage area was designed as a small hotel, complete with a “front desk,” where performers picked up their room keys and mail. Kitchen facilities and a children’s playroom were available. The dressing rooms are named after cities on the vaudeville touring routes.

In 1929, the Palace was renamed the RKO (Radio Keith Orpheum) Palace. The theater was closed as a movie theater by RKO in 1975. It was later renovated and preserved by owner Katherine LeVeque as a home for Opera Columbus and touring Broadway shows. In 1989, the Palace Theatre was purchased by the non-profit theater management company CAPA, which consolidated its administrative functions with those of the Ohio Theatremarker. The Palace now hosts performances by the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, the Jazz Arts Group, the Broadway Series, and scores of CAPA-sponsored shows.

The Palace's Wurlitzer organ was removed in the 1960s by the Central Ohio Theatre Organ Society and is now installed at Thomas Worthington High School in Worthington, Ohiomarker.

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