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Pikesville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Baltimore County, Marylandmarker, United Statesmarker. Pikesville is just northwest of the Baltimoremarker city limits. It is the northwestern suburb closest to Baltimore.

The population was 29,123 at the 2000 census. The corridor along Interstate 795 which links Pikesville, Owings Millsmarker and Reisterstownmarker to the Baltimore Beltway (Interstate 695) contains one of the larger Jewish populations in Maryland.

Geography

The Pikes Theater, one of Pikesville's historic landmarks.
Currently, a theater-themed diner occupies the building
Pikesville is located at (39.379039, -76.705091) .

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 12.4 square miles (32.1 km²), of which, 12.4 square miles (32.1 km²) of it is land and 0.08% is water.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 29,123 people, 12,747 households, and 8,145 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,348.4 people per square mile (906.8/km²). There were 13,391 housing units at an average density of 1,079.8/sq mi (417.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 86.39% White, 8.52% African American, 0.09% Native American, 3.49% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.50% of the population.

There were 12,747 households out of which 24.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 19.7% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 23.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 86.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $58,598, and the median income for a family was $78,002 (these figures had risen to $73,846 and $100,237 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $52,079 versus $37,179 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $41,035. About 5.0% of families and 6.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

In 2000, 19.3% of Pikesville residents identified as being of Russianmarker heritage. This was the highest percentage of Russian Americans of any place in the United States.

Jewish community

In the 19th and early 20th centuries Jewish immigrants to the Baltimore area first formed enclaves in East Baltimore not far from Johns Hopkins Hospitalmarker in neighborhoods such as Broadway East, Jonestown, Middle East and Oliver. During World War II, the Jewish community started to move outside Baltimore City into Pikesville. Jews still owned many of the neighborhood businesses in their old communities up to the Baltimore riot of 1968.

Pikesville is now considered the center of the Baltimore area's Jewish community of 100,000 (referred to by residents as "100,000 Jews in three zip codes") . Many of the region's largest and most established synagogues and Jewish schools are located in or near Pikesville. In the past few decades, the Jewish community has expanded further outside the city of Baltimore to other more distant northwestern suburbs, including Owings Millsmarker and Reisterstownmarker.

History

Pikesville was named after the American soldier and explorer Zebulon Pike (1779–1813). While there are places named for Pike in many other states, Pikesville, Maryland is the only place named "Pikesville" (compare Pikeville, Kentuckymarker).

Education

Pikesville is served by several elementary, middle, and high schools and higher-education facilities:

Public

  • Fort Garrison Elementary School
  • Milbrook Elementary
  • Summit Park Elementary School
  • Wellwood International School (elementary)




Independent



Higher education



Government

The Maryland State Police is headquartered at 1201 Reisterstown Road in the Pikesville CDP.

Transportation

Roads

I-695 (Baltimore Beltway)

Baltimore Beltway exits 20 (Reisterstown Road), 21 (Park Heights Avenue/Stevenson Road), and 22 (Greenspring Avenue) are in Pikesville.

Reisterstown Road

Maryland Route 140, better known as Reisterstown Road, is Pikesville's historic "Main Street," holding most of Pikesville's commercial development. Located on Reisterstown Road are the area's historic shops (mostly inside the Baltimore Beltway), and some more modern shopping centers (mostly outside the beltway).

Old Court Road

Old Court Road is one of the major cross-county roads in Pikesville, providing direct access to nearby Winands Road in Randallstownmarker and Ruxtonmarker. While mostly residential, there is a small amount of commercial development on Old Court Road, plus the Old Court Metro Subway Station.

Smith Avenue/Slade Avenue/Milford Mill Road

Pikesville's other major cross-county road is known in various sections as Smith Avenue, Slade Avenue, or Milford Mill Road. This road provides access to nearby Milford Millmarker and Mt. Washington. The road is lined mostly with residential development, but is also home to the Milford Mill Metro Subway Station and passes some of the area's public schools and shopping districts.

Park Heights Avenue/Stevenson Road

Maryland Route 129, better known as Park Heights Avenue, runs parallel to Reisterstown Road, and is used as a back-road alternative to Reisterstown Road by motorists. In the Pikesville area, the road is lined with upscale housing on the east side, and by Suburban Country Club and Druid Ridge Cemetery on the west. At Old Court Road, the parallel Stevenson Road splits off. While westbound access to the Baltimore Beltway is available from Park Heights Avenue, the ramps for eastbound traffic can be found on Stevenson Road. The two roads at this point are also linked by Brooks Robinson Drive (MD-129A), formerly called Radio Tower Drive. The two residential developments bounded by Brooks Robinson Dr. (N); Stevenson Rd. (E); Park Heights Ave. (W); and the intersection of Stevenson, Park Heights, and Old Court Rd. (S) are "Fields of Stevenson" and the older "Sugarville," after developer Gordon Sugar.

Stevenson Road

Stevenson Road parallels Park Heights Avenue between Old Court Road and Greenspring Valley Road as a through road and continues past Greenspring Valley Road as a side street to a series of dead end streets. The road, which is mostly residential, is the eastern half of Exit 21 from the Baltimore Beltway (along with Park Heights Avenue). The most notable landmarks on or near the road are Chizuk Amuno Synagoguemarker, the Stevenson Shopping Center (a small shopping center with a post office), and Fort Garrisonmarker (located on a side street off Stevenson Road).

Brooks Robinson Drive (formerly name Radio Tower Drive)

A street for most of Stevenson and Park Heights traffic in the Pikesvile/Owings Mills area.

Sudbrook Lane/Road

The historic one-lane bridge on Sudbrook Lane


Sudbrook Lane is a two-lane road that splits off from Old Court Road near Park Heights Avenue and continues to Milford Mill Road, before it changes identification to Sudbrook Road until its end at Rockridge Road. The most notable feature on this road, which runs through historic Sudbrook Park, is the historic one-lane bridge, which was recently reconstructed.

Public transportation

The Baltimore Metro Subway runs through Pikesville, with two stops in the area, both named for the roads on which they are located. The Milford Mill and Old Court Metro subway stations, which are located away from Reisterstown Road, offer plenty of parking and bus service to other parts of Pikesville. Maryland Transit Administration bus routes serving Pikesville include nos. M-2 and 59 on Reisterstown Road and 54 on Milford Mill Road.

Pikesville in national/international news

Vernon Evans has been a key figure in the battle against lethal injection in Maryland and other states. He is currently on death row for the murders of two clerks at a Pikesville motel in 1983.

Ziad Jarrah, a suspected terrorist involved in the 9/11 attacks, was pulled over two days earlier for speeding in Pikesville.

In April 2005, nine bison knocked down their gate on a nearby farm and roamed free around the Pikesville area until police officers were able to corral them onto the tennis court of a townhouse complex by Hooks Lane, several miles away. The owner, Gerald "Buzz" Berg, said that the bison were likely headed for a trip to the slaughterhouse. Police said Berg would face no charges.

References

  1. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ADPTable?_bm=y&-context=adp&-qr_name=ACS_2007_3YR_G00_DP3YR3&-ds_name=ACS_2007_3YR_G00_&-tree_id=3307&-redoLog=false&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_id=16000US2461400&-format=&-_lang=en
  2. Home page. Maryland State Police. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  3. " Pikesville CDP, Maryland." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on March 23, 2009.
  4. http://www.ndpteachers.org/strausbaughl/vernon_evans.htm
  5. http://edition.cnn.com/2002/US/01/09/inv.hijacker.traffic.stops/
  6. http://www.wbaltv.com/news/4415797/detail.html


External links


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