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Populous, formerly known as HOK Sport, is an architectural firm specializing in the design of sports facilities and convention centers, as well as planning of major special events.

The firm enjoys a dominant role in the design of sporting stadia and arenas, and particularly Major League Baseball facilities. Since its groundbreaking and widely praised design for Oriole Park at Camden Yardsmarker, which opened in 1992, the firm has served as architect for 16 out of 19 new ballparks that have opened in the majors, including those for the New York Yankees and the New York Mets. The firm has also been responsible for some of the world's largest and most prestigious venues, such as Wembley Stadium in London, Ascot Racecourse, Wimbledon Centre Court, ANZ Stadium in Sydney, and most recently, London's Olympic Stadium for the 2012 Games. The firm's indoor arena work has included major arenas around the world, including the O2 Arenas in London, Dublin and Berlin.

Populous formerly operated as HOK Sport Venue Event, which was part of the HOK Group. In January 2009, Populous was created through a management buyout, becoming independently owned and operated. It is reported to be one of the largest architecture firms in the world.

History

Logo of the former HOK Sports
HOK under Jerry Sincoff created its sports group in 1983 (initially called the Sports Facilities Group and later changed to HOK Sport Venue Event). It consisted of eight architects. They were based in Kansas City, Missourimarker in the city's Garment Districtmarker in the Lucas Place office building. In 2005 it moved into its current headquarters at 300 Wyandotte in the River Marketmarker neighborhood in a new building it designed, on land developed as an urban renewal project through tax incentives from the city's Planned Industrial Expansion Authority. It was the first major company to relocate to the neighborhood in several decades.

The company is one of several Kansas City-based sports design firms that trace their roots to Kivett and Myers which designed by the Truman Sports Complexmarker which was one of the first modern large single purpose sports stadiums (previously, stadiums were designed for multipurpose use). Other firms with sports design presence in Kansas City that trace their roots to Kivett include Ellerbe Becket Inc. and HNTB Corp..

Offices

United States



International



Sports projects

American football

NFL and College football



Arena Football League



Baseball

MLB



Minor league baseball



College baseball



Basketball

NBA



WNBA



Ice hockey

NHL



AHL



ECHL



Football



Rugby League



Lacrosse



Multipurpose



Venue projects

Convention and Civic centers



Event projects

Olympics



National Football League

(selected events)

Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball All-Star Game
  • 1993 - Baltimore, Maryland
  • 1999 — Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2000 — Atlanta, Georgia
  • 2001 — Seattle, Washington
  • 2002 — Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • 2003 — Chicago, Illinois
  • 2004 — Houston, Texas
  • 2005 — Detroit, Michigan
  • 2006 — Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • 2007 — San Francisco, California
  • 2008 - New York, New York
  • 2009 — St. Louis, Missouri


Football (Soccer) events

(Selected Events)

Other events

(Selected Events)

References

  1. Kevin Collison, "HOK Sport Venue now stands alone", Kansas City Star, January 5, 2009.
  2. Populous official website
  3. Kevin Collison, "Sports architecture firm changes name", Kansas City Star, March 31, 2009 (access date March 31, 2009).
  4. International Directory of Company Histories, Vol.59. St. James Press, 2004
  5. HOK Sport Venue Event changes name to Populous - Kansas City Business Journal - March 31, 2009
  6. Thanks. Now Scram - The Pitch - Kansas City - February 1, 2007
  7. New Game Plan - Kansas City Business Journal - June 20, 2003
  8. [http://www.thebostonglobe.com/dailyglobe2/228/sports/Finding_a_comfort_zone+.shtml Comfort Zone - Boston Globe - November 19, 2001


External links




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