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The Privy Council of Tonga is the privy council of the Kingdom of Tongamarker. It belongs both to the executive and judiciary branches of government. Similarly to the British Privy Council, its main executive role is to advise the monarch on how to exercise his executive authority, while its main judiciary role is to serve as a supreme court of appeal.

Executive functions

The Privy Council of Tonga is composed of the monarch (who presides over it as chairman), the Cabinet, the Governor of Ha'apaimarker and the Governor of Vava'umarker. Thus, the Privy Council's executive functions are exercised primarily through the King and his Cabinet. The Council "makes major policy decisions". De jure, it is the highest executive body of the Kingdom.

Judiciary functions

The Privy Council appoints the judges of the Court of Appeal.

As a court of law, the Privy Council "presides over cases relating to disputes over titles of nobility and estate boundaries". It is also Tonga's final court of appeal in all cases except criminal cases.

Legislative functions

The Privy Council is empowered to make laws, "subject to parliamentary confirmation". As a law-making body, it is thus legally subordinate to the Legislative Assembly of Tonga.

External links



References

  1. "Monarchy : Overview", Tongan government website, July 11, 2008
  2. "Kingdom of Tona", Michael R. Ogden, World Encyclopedia of Political Systems, 3rd edition
  3. "Tonga", The World Factbook
  4. "Tonga human rights practices, 1993", United States Department of State
  5. "Kingdom of Tona", Michael R. Ogden, World Encyclopedia of Political Systems, 3rd edition
  6. "Tonga", The World Factbook
  7. "Tonga human rights practices, 1993", United States Department of State
  8. "Kingdom of Tona", Michael R. Ogden, World Encyclopedia of Political Systems, 3rd edition
  9. "Kingdom of Tona", Michael R. Ogden, World Encyclopedia of Political Systems, 3rd edition



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