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The Provisional Government of Saskatchewan was the name given by Louis Riel to the independent state he declared during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885 in what is today the Canadianmarker province of Saskatchewanmarker. Although Riel initially hoped to rally the First Nations, Anglo-Metis, and white settlers of the Saskatchewan Valley to his banner, this did not occur. The government, with the exception of Honoré Jaxon and Chief White Cap, had an entirely French-speaking and Metis leadership. Gabriel Dumont was proclaimed Adjutant General in which capacity he became supreme military commander, although Riel could, and did, override his tactical decisions.

Exovedate

 Batoche, where a Métis  Provisional Government had been formed, has been declared a National Historic Site. Batoche marks the site of Gabriel Dumont's grave site, Albert Caron’s House, Batoche school, Batoche cemetery, Letendre store, Gabriels river crossing, Gardepy's crossing, Batoche crossing, St. Antoine de Padoue Church, Métis rifle pits, and RNWMP battle camp.
The governing council was named the Exovedate, Latin for "of the flock", and debated issues ranging from military policy to local bylaws and theological issues. It met at Batoche, Saskatchewanmarker, and only exercised real authority during its existence over the Southbranch Settlement.

The provisional government collapsed with the fall of Batoche (see Battle of Batoche) and Riel surrendering to the overwhelming Canadian forces only after he ran out of ammunition.

In the spring of 2008, Tourism, Parks, Culture and Sport Minister Christine Tell proclaimed in Duck lake, that "the 125th commemoration, in 2010, of the 1885 Northwest Resistance is an excellent opportunity to tell the story of the prairie Métis and First Nations peoples' struggle with Government forces and how it has shaped Canada today."

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