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Sheriff Court: Map

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Sheriff courts provide the local court service in Scotlandmarker, with each court serving a sheriff court district within a sheriffdom.

Sheriff courts deal with a myriad of legal procedures which include:



Functions and operation

The legal cases which are heard within the Courts are dealt with by a Sheriff. A Sheriff is a Judge who is usually assigned to work in a specific Court although some work as 'floating Sheriffs' who may work anywhere in Scotland. There are about a hundred and forty full-time Sheriffs in the various Courts and a number of part-time Sheriffs. They are appointed on the recommendation of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland. Until recently there were also 'temporary sheriffs' who were appointed by the executive year by year and only sat for particular days by invitation; this class of sheriff was abolished as being inconsistent with judicial independence following the decision of the High Court of Justiciarymarker in Starrs v Ruxton.

Staffing

The Courts are staffed by civil servants who are employed by the Scottish Court Service which is an executive agency of the Scottish Government. The Scottish Court Service publishes an online map, lists of Sheriffs, and the rules of the court under different procedures.

Organisation

There are six Sheriffdoms in Scotland, each with a Sheriff Principal. Within each sheriffdom are sheriff court districts, each with a court presided over by one or more sheriffs. The most senior civil servant in each Court is the sheriff clerk and he or she is charged directly with the management of the Court. The Sherriffdoms are Glasgow and Strathkelvin, Grampian, Highland and Islands, Lothian and Borders, North Strathclyde, South Strathclyde, Dumfries and Galloway, and Tayside Central and Fifemarker.


There are currently 49 Sheriff Courts in Scotland. Some, in rural areas of Scotland, are small due to the sparse population. Courts such as those in the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow have a large number of staff and can in one day deal with hundreds of cases. Glasgow Sheriff Court, for example, is the busiest Court in Europe.

Sheriffdom District
Glasgow and Strathkelvin Glasgowmarker and Strathkelvin
Grampian, Highlands and Islands Aberdeenmarker
Banffmarker
Dingwallmarker
Dornochmarker
Elginmarker
Fort Williammarker
Invernessmarker
Kirkwallmarker
Lerwickmarker
Lochmaddymarker
Peterheadmarker
Portreemarker
Stonehavenmarker
Stornowaymarker
Tainmarker
Wickmarker
Lothian and Borders Dunsmarker
Edinburghmarker
Haddington
Jedburghmarker
Linlithgowmarker
Peeblesmarker
Selkirkmarker
North Strathclyde Campbeltownmarker
Dumbartonmarker
Dunoonmarker
Greenockmarker
Kilmarnockmarker
Obanmarker
Paisleymarker
Rothesaymarker
South Strathclyde, Dumfries and Galloway Airdriemarker
Ayrmarker
Dumfriesmarker
Hamiltonmarker
Kirkcudbrightmarker
Lanarkmarker
Stranraermarker
Tayside Central and Fifemarker Alloamarker
Arbroathmarker
Cuparmarker
Dundeemarker
Dunfermlinemarker
Falkirkmarker
Forfarmarker
Kirkcaldymarker
Perthmarker
Stirlingmarker


Relationship to other courts

Sheriff Courts are above local District Courts who deal with very minor offences and below the Supreme Courts. The High Court of Justiciarymarker deals with serious criminal matters, such as Murder, and the Court of Sessionmarker is Scotland's supreme civil court.

Any final decision of a Sheriff may be appealed. There is a right of appeal in civil cases to the Sheriff Principal, and in most cases onwards to the Court of Sessionmarker. Criminal decisions are appealed to the High Court of Justiciarymarker.

So far as civil procedure is concerned, there are different sets of rules for small claims (payment of up to £3000); summary causes (mostly eviction actions)and monetary value between £3000 and £5000; and ordinary causes (the rest). These are all published online, and direct links to them are on this page.

See also



References



External links




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