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The Spanish national football team represents Spainmarker in internationalmarker football and is controlled by the . The majority of Spain's matches are held at stadia in Madridmarker and Valenciamarker. The Spanish side are commonly referred to as La Furia Roja (The Red Fury).

Spain are the current European champions, having won the UEFA European Championship in 2008. They also won the European Nations' Cup in 1964 and reached the UEFA Euro 1984 Final. Spain have qualified for the FIFA World Cup twelve times, reaching fourth place in the 1950 tournament.

In July 2008, Spain rose to the top of the FIFA World Ranking for the first time in their history, becoming the sixth nation, and the first who has never won the World Cup, to top this ranking. Between November 2006 and June 2009, Spain went undefeated for a record tying 35 consecutive matches —record shared with Brazil— including a record 15-game winning streak.

History

Early years

Following the model set by the English Football Association, Spain created their football organization, the Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF in Spanish), in 1909 and their domestic first division league La Liga (The League) in 1928. Spain made their international football debut at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerpmarker, and won the silver medal. Prior to this, Spain's national team had been composed of semi-professionals and amateurs playing unofficial international matches and was organized by the RFEF. They played their first home international in 1921, beating Belgium 2–0 in Bilbaomarker. They also became the first non-Britishmarker side to beat England when they won 4–3 in a friendly in Madridmarker in 1929. Although Spain did not enter the 1930 World Cup, they qualified for the second World Cup held in Italy in 1934, and progressed to the quarterfinals and drew 1–1 with Italy before losing a replay 1–0.

1950 World Cup

The Spanish Civil War and World War II prevented Spain from playing another competitive match until the 1950 World Cup. There they topped their group against England, Chile and the United States to progress to the final round. The cup was decided in a league format against the other group winners — Brazil, Uruguay, and Sweden. Spain gained only one point by drawing with eventual winners Uruguay, losing to both Brazil and Sweden, thus finishing fourth, which remains, as of 2008, their best performance in a World Cup. The team failed to qualify for another major tournament until the 1962 World Cup.

Under French-Argentine coach Helenio Herrera, Spain came out of dormancy to qualify for the first European Championship in 1960. Spain beat Poland 7–2 on aggregate to progress to the quarterfinals. However, Spain forfeited its quarterfinal tie with the Soviet Unionmarker because of political circumstances between Spain's dictator Franco and the Soviets.

José Villalonga era and the 1964 European champions

In 1962, José Villalonga was appointed coach of Spain. Under Villalonga, Spain qualified for the 1962 World Cup but were eliminated in the first round group against Brazil, Czechoslovakia, and Mexico. Two years later they hosted the European Championship, in which they beat Romania, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to move on to the semifinals. There they beat highly-favoured Hungary 2–1 after extra time. They went on to face the USSR 2–1 before a crowd of more than 79,000 at the Bernabéumarker in Madridmarker. Jesus María Pereda put Spain ahead after just six minutes, but Galimzian Khusainov equalised a few minutes later with a free kick. Marcelino Martínez put in a late header to win Spain's first major international title.

As European champions, Spain automatically qualified for the 1966 World Cup, retaining much of the same squad from 1964 and keeping José Villalonga at the helm. However, they failed to progress beyond the first round, defeating only Switzerland and losing to West Germany and Argentina.

The departure of Villalonga put Spain into another period of mixed results. After winning their group in the qualifying rounds of the Euro 68, they were knocked out by England in the quarterfinals and did not make it to the final tournament held in Italy. Spain did not qualify for another tournament until Euro 76.

Late 1970s and early 1980s

Spain returned to form with an undefeated progess through a qualifying group for Euro 76 against Romania, Scotland, and Denmark, but failed to reach the final stages after a 3-1 defeat by West Germany in the quarterfinals.

The 1978 World Cup witnessed Spain's first World Cup finals appearance since 1966. Spain qualified by finishing top of a group including Yugoslavia and Romania with three wins in four matches. In the finals, Spain were drawn into group 3 with Brazil, Austria, and Sweden. Spain started the finals by losing 2–1 to Austria, but despite drawing with Brazil 0–0 and defeating Sweden 1–0, they were knocked out at that stage.

Euro 1980 saw Spain qualify for the first eight-team European championship by surpassing Romania, Yugoslavia, and Cyprus. At the tournament in Italy, Spain was drawn into group B with the hosts, England, and Belgium. Spain gained only one point after a draw with Italy and again exited without reaching the quarterfinals.

1982 World Cup in Spain

In 1976, Spain was selected as host of the 1982 FIFA World Cup. This edition of the World Cup featured 24 teams for the first time. Expectations were high for Spain as the host nation under coach José Santamaría. In the group stages, Spain was drawn into Group 5, in which they could only manage a 1–1 draw with Honduras in the finals' opening match, after which they had a 2–1 victory over Yugoslavia, but were defeated 1–0 by Northern Ireland. These results were enough to secure progress to the second round where they were drawn into Group B, but defeat to West Germany and a goalless draw with England meant that Spain were knocked out, and Santamaría was sacked.

1984 to 1988

Former Real Madrid coach Miguel Muñoz, who had temporarily coached Spain in 1969, returned to the national side. Spain were in Euro 84 qualifying Group 7, against The Netherlands, Republic of Ireland, Iceland, and Malta. Entering the last match, Spain needed to defeat Malta by at least 11 goals to surpass the Netherlands for the top spot in the group, and after leading 3-1 at half time, Spain scored 9 goals in the second half to win by 12-1 and win the group. In the finals tournament, Spain were drawn into group B with Romania, Portugal, and West Germany: after 1-1 draws against their first two opponents, Spain topped the group by virtue of a 1–0 victory against West Germany. The semifinals saw Spain and Denmark drawn at 1-1 after extra time, before Spain proceeded by virtue of winning the penalty shootout 5–4 on penalties. Hosts and tournament favourites France defeated Spain 2-0 in the final after a goalless first half.

Spain qualified for the 1986 World Cup in Mexicomarker having topped Group 7 with Scotland, Wales, and Iceland. Spain began the group stage by losing to Brazil 1–0, but progressed after beating Northern Ireland by 2–1 and Algeria by 3–0. Round 2 paired Spain with Denmark, who they overcame 5–1 with Emilio Butragueño scoring four goals, but in the quarterfinals a 1–1 draw with Belgium ended with Belgium winning 5–4 on penalties.

Muñoz was retained as coach for Euro 88. As in the several previous tournaments Spain qualified impressively in a group with Austria, Romania, and Albania. Spain were drawn into group A and began their tournament with a 3–2 victory over Denmark, but were nevertheless knocked out in the group stage after losing 1–0 and 2–0 to Italy and West Germany respectively.

1990 to 1992

For the 1990 World Cup in Italy, Spain had a new coach, Luis Suárez. Having qualified from a group consisting of Republic of Ireland, Hungary, Northern Ireland, and Malta, Spain entered the competition on a good run of form, and after reaching the knock out stages through a 0–0 draw with Uruguay and wins over South Korea (3–1) and Belgium (2–1), fell to a 2–1 defeat to Yugoslavia in the second round.

Newly appointed coach Vicente Miera failed to gain qualification for Spain for Euro 92, after finishing third in a group behind France and Czechoslovakia. Vicente Miera did however lead Spain to the gold medal at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelonamarker.

Clemente's reign, 1992–98

Javier Clemente was appointed as Spain's coach in 1992, and the qualification for the 1994 World Cup was achieved with eight wins and one loss in twelve matches. In the final tournament Spain were in Group C in which they drew with Korea Republic 2–2 and 1–1 with Germany, before qualifying for the second round with a 3–1 victory over Bolivia. Spain continued through the second round with a 3-0 victory over Switzerland, but their tournament ended with a 2–1 defeat to Italy in the quarter-finals.

Spain qualified for Euro 96 from a group consisting of Denmark, Belgium, Cyprus, Macedonia, and Armenia. In the final tournament Spain faced group matches against Bulgaria, France and Romania. With 1–1 draws against the first two opponents, and a 2–1 win over Romania, Spain confirmed their place in the quarter-finals, with a match with hosts England, which finished goalless and Spain eventually fell 4–2 in the shootout.

In his second World Cup as Spain's coach, Clemente led his team undefeated through their qualifying group in which Yugoslavia and Czech Republic were the other contenders. Spain qualified with fourteen other European sides in the first ever thirty-two team World Cup, but were eliminated in the first round with four points after losing to Nigeria, drawing with Paraguay, and winning just one game, against Bulgaria.

Euro 2000 and World Cup 2002

After a 3–2 opening defeat to Cyprus in Euro 2000 qualifying, Clemente was fired and José Antonio Camacho was appointed as coach. Spain won the rest of their games to qualify for the final tournament, where they were drawn into Group C. A 1-0 defeat to Norway was followed by victories over Slovenia (2-1) and Yugoslavia (4–3), with Spain thus setting up a quarterfinal against 1998 World Cup champions, France, which was won 2-1 by France.

The qualifying tournament for the 2002 World Cup went as expected for Spain as they topped a group consisting of Austria, Israel, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Liechtenstein. In the finals tournament Spain won its three matches in group B, against Slovenia, Paraguay (both by 3-1), and South Africa (3-2). Spain beat Republic of Ireland on penalties in the second round, and faced co-hosts Korea Republic in the quarterfinals. Spain twice thought they had scored, but the efforts were disallowed, and Korea were successful in the penalty shootout after a 0-0 draw.

Euro 2004

At Euro 2004 in Portugal, Spain were drawn into group A with hosts Portugal, Russia and Greece, behind whom they had finished second in qualifying. Spain defeated Russia 1–0 and drew 1–1 with Greece, but failed to get the draw they needed against Portugal to proceed to the knock out stages. Iñaki Sáez was sacked weeks later and replaced by Luis Aragonés.

Luis Aragonés era, 2006 World Cup and Euro 2008

Spain qualified for the 2006 World Cup only after a play-off against Slovakia, as they had finished behind Serbia and Montenegro in Group 7, which also included Bosnia and Herzegovina, Belgium, Lithuania, and San Marino. In Group H of the German hosted finals, Spain won all their matches, beating Ukraine 4–0, Tunisia 3–1 and Saudi Arabia 1-0. However Spain fell 3–1 in the second round to France team, with only the consolation of a share, with Brazil, of the 2006 FIFA Fair Play Award.Spain qualified for Euro 2008 at the top of Qualifying Group F with 28 points out of a possible 36, and were seeded 12th for the finals. They won all their games in Group D: 4–1 against Russia, and 2-1 against both Sweden and defending champions Greece.

Spanish players celebrating their victory in Madrid.
Reigning World Cup holders Italy were the opponents in the quarter final match, and held Spain to a finished 0–0 draw resulting in a penalty shoot-out which Spain won 4–2. Spain met Russia again in the semi-final, again beating them, this time by 3–0..

In the final, played in Viennamarker's Ernst-Happel-Stadionmarker, Spain defeated Germany 1–0, with a goal scored by Fernando Torres in the 33rd minute. This was Spain's first major title since the 1964 European Championship. Spain were the top scoring team, with 12 goals, and David Villa finished as the top scorer with four goals; Xavi was awarded the player of the tournament, and nine Spanish players were picked for the UEFA Euro 2008 Team of the Tournament.

Shortly after the tournament, Spain reached the top of the FIFA World Rankings for the first time, the first team never to have won a World Cup to achieve this.

Confederations Cup debut and 2010 World Cup

Luis Aragonés left the manager's role after the Euro 2008 success, and was replaced by Vicente del Bosque.

2008 saw David Villa scoring 12 goals in 15 games, thus breaking the Spanish record of 10 goals in one year held by Raúl since 1999. On 11 February 2009, David Villa broke another Spanish record against England, as his 36th-minute goal saw him become the first Spanish player to score in six consecutive games.

Spain began their 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification campaign with six successive wins, and went into the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup as one of the favourites. By the start of the tournament, Del Bosque's had ten consecutive wins, making him the first international manager to do so from his debut, breaking Joao Saldanha's record, held since 1969, of nine consecutive wins with Brazil.

Spain won all three of their matches at the group stage, the 5–0 win over New Zealandmarker including a Fernando Torres hat-trick that is the earliest and fastest hat-trick in the tournament's history. With further wins over Iraq (1–0) and (2–0) they earned not only qualification for the semifinals, but also obtained the world record for 15 consecutive wins and tied the record of 35 consecutive unbeaten games (with ).

On 24 June 2009, Spain's undefeated record ended when the United States beat them in the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup semi-finals, 2–0. Spain defeated hosts 3–2 after extra time in the 3rd-place playoff.

On 9 September 2009, Spain secured their place at the 2010 World Cup finals after beating Estonia 3–0 in Méridamarker. They went on to record a perfect World Cup qualifying record with 10 wins out of 10 in Group 5, finishing with a 5–2 victory over Bosnia and Herzegovina on 14 October 2009.

Uniform kit

Spain's traditional kit is a red jersey with yellow trim accompanied by dark blue shorts and socks while their traditional away kit is either a full white kit with red and yellow trim or a yellow jersey with dark blue shorts and socks. Their current home kit is a lighter red than usual along with light blue shorts and red socks, similar to the older 2006 kit. A third kit is sometimes used and is usually blue with red and yellow trim. Spain's kit is currently designed by Adidas. Rather than displaying the logo of the Spanish football federation, Spain's jersey traditionally features the Coat of arms of Spain over the left breast.

2010 FIFA World Cup qualification

Competitive record

World Cup record

Host nation(s) / Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1930 Did Not Enter - - - - - - -
1934 Quarter-final 5 3 1 1 1 4 3
1938 Entry not accepted by FIFA - - - - - - -
1950 Fourth Place 4 6 3 1 2 10 12
1954 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
1958 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
1962 Round 1 12 3 1 0 2 2 3
1966 Round 1 10 3 1 0 2 4 5
1970 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
1974 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
1978 Round 1 10 3 1 1 1 2 2
1982 Round 2 12 5 1 2 2 4 5
1986 Quarter-final 8 5 3 1 1 11 4
1990 Round of 16 14 4 2 1 1 6 4
1994 Quarter-final 6 5 2 2 1 10 6
1998 Round 1 17 3 1 1 1 8 4
** 2002 Quarter-final 8 5 3 2 0 10 5
2006 Round of 16 10 4 3 0 1 9 4
2010 Qualified - - - - - - -
Total 13/19 - 49 22 12 15 80 57




European Championship record

Host nation(s) / Year Round GP W D* L GS GA
1960 Refused - - - - - -
1964 Champions 2 2 0 0 4 2
1968 Did not qualify - - - - - -
1972 Did not qualify - - - - - -
1976 Did not qualify - - - - - -
1980 Round 1 3 0 1 2 2 4
1984 Runners-up 5 1 3 1 4 5
1988 Round 1 3 1 0 2 3 5
1992 Did not qualify - - - - - -
1996 Quarter-final 4 1 3 0 4 3
2000 Quarter-final 4 2 0 2 7 7
2004 Round 1 3 1 1 1 2 2
2008 Champions 6 5 1 0 12 3
Total 8/13 30 13 9 8 38 31


*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.
.



Confederations Cup record



Host nation(s) / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA
1992 - 2005 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
2009 Third Place 5 4 0 1 11 4
Total 1/8 5 4 0 1 11 4


*Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.


Head to head

Recent matches

Date Competition Location Home Team Result Away Team Scorers
11 February 2009
Friendly
Estadio Sánchez Pizjuán, Sevillamarker
2–0
David Villa , Llorente
28 March 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualifying
Bernabéu Stadiummarker, Madridmarker
1–0
Gerard Piqué
1 April 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualifying
Ali Sami Yen Stadiummarker, Istanbulmarker
1–2
SemihAlonso , Riera
9 June 2009
Friendly
Tofik Bakhramov Stadiummarker, Bakumarker
0–6
David Villa , , , Riera , Güiza , Torres
14 June 2009
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
Royal Bafokeng Stadiummarker, Rustenburgmarker
0–5
Torres , , , Fàbregas , David Villa
17 June 2009
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
Free State Stadiummarker, Bloemfonteinmarker
1–0
David Villa
20 June 2009
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
Free State Stadiummarker, Bloemfonteinmarker
2–0
David Villa , Llorente
24 June 2009
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
Free State Stadiummarker, Bloemfonteinmarker
0–2
Jozy Altidore , Clint Dempsey
28 June 2009
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup
Royal Bafokeng Stadiummarker, Rustenburgmarker
3–2
a.e.t.
Guiza , AlonsoMphela
12 August 2009
Friendly
Philip II Arenamarker, Skopjemarker
2–3
PandevTorres Piqué Riera
5 September 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualifying
Estadio Riazormarker, A Coruñamarker
5–0
David Silva , David Villa , Gerard Pique
9 September 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification
Estadio Romanomarker, Méridamarker
3–0
Fàbregas , Santi Cazorla , Juan Mata
10 October 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification
Hrazdan Stadiummarker, Yerevanmarker
1–2
Fàbregas , Arzumanyan , Juan Mata
14 October 2009
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification
Asim Ferhatović Hase Stadiummarker, Sarajevomarker
2–5
Džeko , MisimovićPiqué , David Silva , Negredo , , Juan Mata
14 November 2009
Friendly
Vicente Calderón Stadiummarker, Madridmarker
2–1
Xabi Alonso , – Messi
18 November 2009
Friendly
Ernst-Happel-Stadionmarker, Viennamarker
1–5
Jakob JantscherFàbregas , David Villa , , Güiza , Pablo Hernández


Forthcoming fixtures

Date Competition Location Home Team Result Away Team Scorers
3 March 2010
Friendly
Stade de Francemarker, Parismarker


2007-2009 undefeated run

Spain went undefeated for a world record 35 matches in a row, after a 1–0 loss to Romania in a friendly match on November 15, 2006. The record is also held by Brazil (not counting defeats after a penalty shoot-out). Spain won 32 out of the 35 matches, while the other 3 ended in draws (one of which was against Italy, a match which Spain ended up winning on penalties). The Spanish side scored 73 goals while conceding only 11, and never allowed more than one goal per match except against Greece, a friendly match on August 22, 2007 which ended 3–2.

Spain also held the world record for consecutive wins, at 15, following their draw against Italy during the quarter finals in UEFA Euro 2008. This winning streak, together with the undefeated run, was ended by the United States on June 24, 2009, in a 2–0 defeat in the semifinal stage of the 2009 Confederations Cup.
Opponent Type Date Result
Friendly match 7 February 2007 1–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 24 March 2007 2–1
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 28 May 2007 1–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 2 June 2007 2–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 6 June 2007 2–0
Friendly match 22 August 2007 3–2
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 8 September 2007 1–1
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 12 September 2007 2–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 13 October 2007 3–1
Friendly match 17 October 2007 0–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 17 November 2007 3–0
UEFA Euro 2008 qualifying 21 November 2007 1–0
Friendly match 6 February 2008 1–0
Friendly match 26 March 2008 1–0
Friendly match 31 May 2008 2–1
Friendly match 4 June 2008 1–0
UEFA Euro 2008 10 June 2008 4–1
UEFA Euro 2008 14 June 2008 2–1
UEFA Euro 2008 18 June 2008 2–1
UEFA Euro 2008 22 June 2008 0–0 (Spain won 4–2 on penalties)
UEFA Euro 2008 26 June 2008 3–0
UEFA Euro 2008 29 June 2008 1–0
Friendly match 20 August 2008 3–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 6 September 2008 1–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 10 September 2008 4–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 11 October 2008 3–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 15 October 2008 2–1
Friendly match 19 November 2008 3–0
Friendly match 11 February 2009 2–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 28 March 2009 1–0
2010 FIFA World Cup qualification 1 April 2009 2–1
Friendly match 9 June 2009 6–0
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup 14 June 2009 5–0
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup 17 June 2009 1–0
2009 FIFA Confederations Cup 20 June 2009 2–0


Honours

This is a list of honours for the senior Spanish national team
* Fourth place (1): 1950
* Winner (2): 1964, 2008
* Runner-up (1): 1984
* Third place (1): 2009
* Gold Medal (1): 1992
* Silver Medal (2): 1920, 2000


Friendly titles



Records

Worldwide

Most consecutive wins: 15 (2008-2009)
Most consecutive games undefeated: 35 (2007-2009) (shared with between 1993-1996)
Most consecutive wins achieved by an international coach from debut: 13 - Vicente Del Bosque
Most shootouts in one World Cup by one team: 2 at the 2002 FIFA World Cup (shared with at the 1990 FIFA World Cup)
World record amount of points in World Cup qualification: 30 out of 30 points (2008-2009)


Nationwide

Most international goals: 44 - Raúl
Most international caps: 126 - Andoni Zubizarreta
Most goals scored in one year: 12 - David Villa (2008 and 2009)
Most consecutive games ended with at least one goal: 6 - David Villa


Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were named for the Friendly match against and on November 14.

Caps and goals as of November 18, 2009, subsequent to the friendly against .

Notes:
* Fernando Torres and Marcos Senna were deemed unfit to be able to participate in the upcoming matches. They were therefore left out of the squad.


Name DOB Club Caps (goals) Debut
Goalkeepers
Iker Casillas (captain) Real Madrid 101 (0) v , 3 June 2000
Pepe Reina Liverpool 19 (0) v , 17 August 2005
Diego López Villarreal 1 (0) v , 12 August 2009
Defenders
Raúl Albiol Real Madrid 21 (0) v , 13 October 2007
Álvaro Arbeloa Real Madrid 12 (0) v , 26 March 2008
Joan Capdevila Villarreal 42 (4) v , 16 October 2002
Andoni Iraola Athletic Bilbao 4 (0) v , 20 August 2008
Carlos Marchena Valencia 56 (2) v , 21 August, 2002
Gerard Piqué Barcelona 13 (4) v , 11 February, 2009
Carles Puyol (1st vice-captain) Barcelona 80 (2) v , 15 November 2000
Sergio Ramos Real Madrid 56 (4) v , 26 March 2005
Midfielders
Xabi Alonso (3rd vice-captain) Real Madrid 65 (7) v , 30 April 2003
Sergio Busquets Barcelona 10 (0) v , 1 April 2009
Cesc Fàbregas Arsenal 47 (5) v , 1 March 2006
Pablo Hernández Valencia 2 (1) v , 20 June 2009
Andrés Iniesta Barcelona 39 (6) v , 27 May 2006
Juan Mata Valencia 7 (3) v , 28 March 2009
Jesús Navas Sevilla 2 (0) v , 14 November 2009
David Silva Valencia 32 (6) v , 15 November 2006
Xavi (2nd vice-captain) Barcelona 83 (8) v , 15 November 2000
Strikers
Dani Güiza Fenerbahçemarker 20 (6) v , 8 November 2007
Álvaro Negredo Sevilla 4 (2) v , 10 October 2009
David Villa Valencia 54 (35) v , 9 February 2005


Recent call ups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last 12 months.

Name DOB Club Caps (goals) Debut Most Recent Call up
Defenders
Juanito Atlético Madrid 25 (3) v , 21 August 2002 v , 1 April 2009
Nacho Monreal Osasuna 2 (0) v , 12 August 2009 v , 14 October 2009
Midfielders
Santi Cazorla Villarreal 24 (2) v , 31 May 2008 v , 14 October 2009
Albert Riera Liverpool 16 (4) v , 13 October 2007 v , 14 October 2009
Marcos Senna Villarreal 27 (1) v , 1 March 2006 v , 14 October 2009
Strikers
Fernando Llorente Athletic Bilbao 5 (2) v , 19 November 2008 v (2009 FIFA Confederations Cup)
Fernando Torres Liverpool 71 (23) v , 6 September 2003 v , 14 October 2009


Previous squads

FIFA World Cup squads:


UEFA European Football Championship squads:


FIFA Confederations Cup squads:


Top goalscorers

As of 18 November 2009, the ten highest scorers for Spain are:
# Player Career Goals (Caps) Avg/game
1 Raúl 1996–2006 44 (102) 0.431
2 David Villa 2005– 35 (54) 0.648
3 Fernando Hierro 1989–2002 29 (89) 0.325
4 Fernando Morientes 1998– 27 (47) 0.574
5 Emilio Butragueño 1984–1992 26 (69) 0.377
6 Alfredo di Stéfano 1957–1961 23 (31) 0.742
Julio Salinas 1986–1996 23 (56) 0.411
Fernando Torres 2003– 23 (71) 0.324
9 Míchel 1985–1992 21 (66) 0.318
10 Telmo Zarra 1945–1951 20 (20) 1.000
  • Bold denotes players still playing international football.


Most capped Spain players

As of 18 November 2009 the ten players with the most caps for Spain are:
# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Andoni Zubizarreta 1985–1998 126 0
2 Raúl 1996–2006 102 44
3 Iker Casillas 2000– 101 0
4 Fernando Hierro 1989–2002 89 29
5 Xavi 2000– 83 8
6 José Antonio Camacho 1975–1988 81 0
7 Carles Puyol 2000– 80 2
8 Rafael Gordillo 1978–1988 75 3
9 Fernando Torres 2003– 71 23
10 Emilio Butragueño 1984–1992 69 26
  • Bold denotes players still playing international football.


Managers



See also



References

External links



Titles


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