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Stafford County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginiamarker, a U.S. state. As of the 2000 census, the population was 92,446, however, the estimated population as of 2007 was 124,117, a 33.0% increase. Its county seat is Staffordmarker . In 2006 Stafford was ranked as the 12th highest income county in America by Forbes Magazine. U.S. Route 1, Interstate 95, and Virginia Railway Express commuter railway serve the county.

This county is also a part of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

History

Stafford County was established by the British colonial government of Virginia in 1664 from territory that was previously part of Westmoreland Countymarker, Arlington Countymarker, the City of Alexandriamarker, Fairfax Countymarker, and Prince William Countymarker, and thus encompassed the majority of what is now considered Northern Virginia. The county is named for Staffordshire, Englandmarker.

Pocahontas, the Indian princess, was kidnapped at Marlborough Point in the eastern part of the county and taken to a secondary English settlement known as Henricus (or Henrico Town). While there, she converted to Christianity and married English settler John Rolfe in April 1614.

George Washington spent much of his childhood in the lower part of the county on his family's home, Ferry Farm, along the Rappahannock Rivermarker across from the city of Fredericksburgmarker. It was during this time that George supposedly cut down the legendary cherry tree. Colonial Forge High School was built on a tract of land owned by his father, Augustine Washington.

George Mason also spent his formative years in Stafford.

Aquia Church, a National Historic Landmark, was built in 1757 and remains open today .

During the Revolutionary War the Stafford iron works furnished arms for the American soldiers .

Aquia Creek Sandstone quarried from Stafford's Government Island was used to build the White Housemarker and the Capitolmarker.

More than 100,000 troops occupied Stafford during the American Civil War for several years. The Battle of Aquia Creek took place in Stafford in the Aquia Harbourmarker area. The Potomac Creek Bridgemarker was vital to both the Union Army and Confederate Army at various times during the war.

In Falmouthmarker, a town in the southern part of Stafford County bordering Fredericksburg, is Belmont, home to the late-19th century artist Gari Melchers.

Stafford County today is considered part of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area and many residents commute north on Interstate Highway 95, U.S. Route 1, and Virginia Railway Express.

In the early morning hours of May 9, 2008, a tornado touched down in the southern part of the county, severely damaging about 140 suburban homes.



Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 280 square miles (725 km²), of which, 270 square miles (700 km²) of it is land and 10 square miles (25 km²) of it (3.43%) is water. The Potomac River flows along part of the eastern border of the county, while the Rappahannock Rivermarker runs along the extent of the county's southern border.

Adjacent counties and independent city



Government and politics

The county is divided into seven magisterial districts: George Washington, Hartwood, Falmouth, Griffis-Widewater, Aquia, Garrisonville, and Rockhill. The magisterial districts each elect one supervisor to the Board of Supervisors which governs Stafford County. The County operates under the county form of the County Executive system of government, with an elected Board of Supervisors. The Board then appoints a professional, nonpartisan County Executive to manage government agencies.

Stafford County is represented by Congressman Rob Wittman in the U.S. House of Representatives. Stafford is represented by William J. Howell in the Virginia House of Delegates. Delegate Bill Howell also serves as the Speaker of the House of Delegates.

Position Name Affiliation First Election District
  Supervisor Cord Sterling Republican 2007 Rockhill
  Supervisor Paul Milde Republican 2005 Aquia
  Supervisor Mark Dudenhefer Republican 2005 Garrisonville
  Supervisor Joe Brito Independent 2005 Hartwood
  Supervisor George Schwartz Democrat 2005 Falmouth
  Supervisor Harry Crisp Democrat 2007 George Washington
  Supervisor Bob Woodson Democrat 2007 Griffis-Widewater


A new Board of Supervisors was elected on November 3, 2009. In January 2010 the new board will be set with the following members:

Position Name Affiliation First Election District
  Supervisor Cord Sterling Republican 2007 Rockhill
  Supervisor Paul Milde Republican 2005 Aquia
  Supervisor Mark Dudenhefer Republican 2005 Garrisonville
  Supervisor Gary Snellings Republican 2009 (also served 2001-2005) Hartwood
  Supervisor Susan Stimpson Republican 2009 Falmouth
  Supervisor Harry Crisp Democrat 2007 George Washington
  Supervisor Bob Woodson Democrat 2007 Griffis-Widewater


Demographics

As of the census of 2005, there were 117,874 people, 38,237 households, and 24,481 families residing in the county. The population density was 342 people per square mile (132/km²). There were 31,405 housing units at an average density of 116 per square mile (45/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.00% white, 15.6% African American, 0.45% 2.1% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 1.21% from other races, and 2.47% from two or more races. 5.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

By 2005 Stafford County's population was 72.8% non-Hispanic whites. African-Americans were 16.1% of the total population. Native Americans were 0.4% of the county total. Asians 2.3%. Native Hawai'ians and other Pacific islanders 0.2%, thus making Stafford County one of the high percentage NHPI population counties in the country. Latinos were 6.4% of the population, above the percentage of Latinos in all of Virginia, put far below Stafford County's northern neighbors.

As of 2000 there were 38,187 households out of which 46.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.00% were married couples living together, 9.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.90% were non-families. 13.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the county, the population was spread out with 31.60% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 33.70% from 25 to 44, 21.10% from 45 to 64, and 5.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 101.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $75,546, and the median income for a family was $78,575 (these figures had risen to $85,793 and $95,433 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $47,080 versus $31,469 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,762. About 2.40% of families and 3.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.30% of those under age 18 and 5.30% of those age 65 or over.

Points of interest

Chatham Manor


Local newspapers


Localities

Geographical


Transportation


Zip Codes
  • 22405, 22406, 22554, 22555, 22556


Education

Colleges

High Schools



Middle Schools

  • T. Benton Gayle Middle School
  • Edward E. Drew Middle School
  • Stafford Middle
  • Dixon-Smith Middle School
  • Rodney Thompson Middle
  • A.G. Wright Middle
  • H.H. Poole Middle
  • Shirley C. Heim Middle


Elementary Schools

  • Conway Elementary
  • Falmouth Elementary
  • Ferry Farm Elementary
  • Grafton Village Elementary
  • Garrisonville Elementary
  • Hartwood Elementary
  • Kate Waller Barrett Elementary
  • Anthony Burns Elementary
  • Margaret Brent Elementary
  • Anne E. Moncure Elementary
  • Park Ridge Elementary
  • Rockhill Elementary
  • Rocky Run Elementary
  • Garrisonville Elementary
  • Stafford Elementary
  • Hampton Oaks Elementary
  • Widewater Elementary
  • Winding Creek Elementary


Major bodies of water



References

External links




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