The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Timeline of Croatian history

Timeline of Croatian history: Map

Advertisements
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



This is a timeline of Croatianmarker history.

This timeline is 'incomplete; some important events may be missing. Please help add to it.

BC



1 AD–600 AD



600–925

The Croats arrived in Balkan peninsula and in what is today Croatiamarker in the early seventh century. They organized into two dukedom: the duchy of Pannonian Croatia in the north, and the duchy of Littoral Croatia in the south.

  • 600 AD In first wave Croats migrated together with Avars from the region that is now (roughly) Galicia and areas of the Pannonian plain, to the province of Dalmatia ruled by the Roman Empire. Croats were led into the Roman province of Dalmatia by a group of five brothers, Klukas, Lobel, Kosenc, Muhlo and Hrvat, and their two sisters, Tuga and Buga.
  • 620 In second wave Croats migrated when the they were invited by the Emperor Heraclius to counter the Avar threat on the Byzantine Empire, or Croats weren't actually invited by Heraclius, but instead defeated the Avars and settled on their own, after migrating from an area near today's Silesia. This record is supported by the writings of one Thomas the archdeacon, Historia Salonitana from the 13th century.
  • 640 Porga of Croatia (Porin) was one of the first known princes ( ) of Dalmatian Croatia, who had been invited into Dalmatia by Byzantium Emperor Heraclius. At Porga's request to Heraclius for Christian teachers, Pope John IV (640-642) sent Christian teachers and missionaries to the Croatian Provinces. These missionaries had converted Porga and great many of the clan that was under his immediate authority, to the Christian faith in 640. Porga ruled in what is today Dalmatia, and his region consisted of 11 counties ( ) which were: Hlebiana, Tzenzena, Emota, Pleba, Pesenta, Parathalassia, Brebere, Nona, Tnena, Sidraga, Nina.
  • 785 - 802 Višeslav of Littoral Croatia left behind a baptistery ( ), surviving to this day, which remains an important symbol of early Croatian history and the people's conversion to Christianity. The incription is in Latin mentions the name of a priest named John ( ) who baptized people during "the time of Prince Višeslav" in the honor of John the Baptist. The Croats from Littoral Croatia warred against the Franks during his rule and avoided defeat until 803 - a year after his death.
  • 803 - 864 During reign of Littoral Croatian princes of Borna, Vladislav and Mislav, Dalmatia was a loyal vassal of the Franks.
  • 838 The Danubian Count Ratbod, Head of the East March, deposed Prince Ratimir and restored Frankish rule in Pannonian Croatia. As Ljudevit Posavski, a Duke of Pannonian Croats from 810 to 823 with its capital in Sisakmarker, led an resistance to Frankish domination.
  • 839 Mislav of Croatia made peace treaty with Pietro Tradonico, doge of Venetian Republicmarker, which led to the growth of Croatian sea power.
  • 840-846 When Pietro's military assault on the Pagania in 840 failed, the Neretvians ( , ) continued to push against him and in 846 breached Venicemarker itself, and raided the neighboring lagoon city of Caorlemarker.
  • 4 March 852 Croatian Duke Trpimir I issued a charter in Biaći (in loco Byaci dicitur) in Latin language, confirming Mislav's donations to the Archbishopric in Splitmarker. In this document Trpimir named himself the "by the mercy of God, Duke of Croats" ( ) and his realm as the "Realm of the Croats" (Regnum Chroatorum).
  • 840-846 When Arab laid siege to Dubrovnikmarker, city appealed to Byzantine Emperor, Basil the Macedonian, who responded by sending over one hundred ships. Finally, the Saracen's siege of Dubrovnik which lasted for fifteen months, was raised due to the intervention of the Basil I, who sent a fleet under Niketas Oryphas in relief.
  • 879 The first native Croatian ruler recognized by the Pope was duke Branimir, whom Pope John VIII called dux Croatorum ("duke of Croats"), thus recognizing the Dukedom of Croatia as an independent state.
  • 18 September 887 Croats from principality of Pagania defeated Venetians near the town of Makarskamarker, killing the Venetian doge Pietro I Candiano in open battle. Venetians start paying prince Branimir (879-892), an annual tribute for the right to travel and trade in the Adriatic Sea.


925–1102

Under Tomislav, a first Croatian king, Kingdom of Croatia became one of the most powerful kingdoms in Medieval Europe. According to Constantine Porphyrogenitus, Tomislav had an army of 160,000 soldiers (60,000 cavalry and 100,000 infantry).

1102–1526



Ban Josip Jelačić's proclamation abolishing serfdom.


The two kingdoms, Kingdom of Croatia and Kingdom of Hungary, were united under the Hungarianmarker king, either by the choice of the Croat nobility or by Hungarian force, in 1102.

1526–1918

Medieval Hungarymarker and Croatiamarker were (in terms of public international law) allied by means of personal union until 1526. Although, Hungarian-Croatian state existed until the beginning of the 20th century and the Treaty of Trianon.

1918–1941

1941–1945

1945–1990

1990–1995

1995–today

See also



Notes

  1. http://timelines.ws/countries/CROATIA.HTML Timeline Croatia
  2. Subjugating: Webster's Timeline History, 393 BC - 2007 by Icon Group International,2009,page 1: "... " 168 BC Second Illyrian War: Illyria was finally conquered in 168 BC
  3. Diocletian Palace
  4. List of Croatian rulers PDF, University of Michigan
  5. Klaić V., Povijest Hrvata, Knjiga Prva, Druga, Treća, Četvrta i Peta Zagreb 1982.
  6. The arrival of Croats in Balkan peninsula is not well documented. Citations from De Administrando Imperio are controversial and disputed by some historians.
  7. Constantine Porphyrogenitus, De Administrando Imperio, ed. Gy. Moravcsik, trans. R.J.H. Jenkins, rev. ed., Washington, Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies, 1967.
  8. Royal Frankish Annales Annales Regni Francorum ed. G. H. Pertz. Monumenta Germanicae Historica, Scriptores rerum Germanicarum 6, (Hannover 1895) for the years 819-822.
  9. Norwich, John Julius. A History of Venice. Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1982.
  10. Hrvatski leksikon (1996-1997)
  11. Copy of the Duke Trpimir's document
  12. Fine, John Van Antwerp (p.257): The" target="_blank"> early medieval Balkans : a critical survey from the sixth to the late twelfth century" University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0472081497 ISBN 9780472081493
  13. H.T. Norris (1994). Islam in the Balkans, C. Hurst & Co. Publishers, ISBN 1-85065-167-1
  14. Stjepan Antoljak, Pregled hrvatske povijesti, Split 1993., str. 43.
  15. Croatian History geocities.com
  16. It is possible that Tomislav was crowned earlier, as pope sent him a letter in which he was mentioned as a rex Croatorum in 925.
  17. Frederick Bernard Singleton (1985). "A Short History of the Yugoslav Peoples", Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-27485-0
  18. ...audivit de Cressimiro Chroatorum principe quod dolo necari fecisset Goislavum fratrem suum misso apocrisario Mainardo...
  19. Stjepan II (1089 - 1091) royalcroatia
  20. Petar Svacic (c.1091- 1097) royalcroatia
  21. Fine, John Van Antwerp: "The Late Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest" University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0472082604
  22. Frederic Chapin Lane (1973). Venice, a Maritime Republic, Johns Hopkins University Press, ISBN 0-8018-1460-X
  23. Prošlost Klisa
  24. 750th Anniversary of the Golden Bull Granted by Bela IV
  25. M. Šašić, »Zlatna bula« - temelj razvoja Zagreba kroz stoljeća, Vjesnik, 17. studenog 1998.
  26. Hrvatski sabor
  27. Šubići bribirski do gubitka nasljedne banske Damir Karbić
  28. http://numizmatika.antikviteti.net/pojma/s1.html
  29. Križevci Bloody Assembly krizevci.eu
  30. Kingdom of Croatia AD 925 - 1918 European Kingdoms
  31. http://www.zum.de/whkmla/region/balkans/croat13011526.html History: 1301 to 1526 AD
  32. Democratic Transition in Croatia: Value Transformation, Education & Media By Sabrina P. Ramet, Davorka Matic, pg. xii
  33. Battle of Krbava field
  34. Font, Marta:Hungarian Kingdom and Croatia in the Middle Age
  35. R. W. SETON -WATSON:The southern Slav question and the Habsburg Monarchy page 18
  36. Milan Kruhek: Cetin, grad izbornog sabora Kraljevine Hrvatske 1527, Karlovačka Županija, 1997, Karlovac
  37. [1] Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers, Item 548456
  38. Turnbull, Stephen. The Ottoman Empire 1326 - 1699. New York: Osprey, 2003. 57
  39. Moačanin, Nenad: Some Problems of Interpretation of Turkish Sources concerning the Battle of Sisak in 1593. In: Nazor, Ante et al.(ed.), Sisačka bitka 1593, Proceedings of the Meeting from 06/18/93 to 06/19/93. Zagreb-Sisak 1994 ISBN/ISSN 9-531-75024-4, pp. 125 - 130
  40. http://www.posta.hr/main.aspx?id=193&idmarke=1852
  41. http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/162/
  42. Barbara Jelavich (1983), History of the Balkans: Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-27458-3
  43. Govor Ivana Kukuljevića Sakcinskog u Saboru 2. svibnja 1843. Hrvatski sabor
  44. "Zahtijevanja naroda" Hrvatski sabor


References

  1. http://timelines.ws/countries/CROATIA.HTML Timeline Croatia
  2. Subjugating: Webster's Timeline History, 393 BC - 2007 by Icon Group International,2009,page 1: "... " 168 BC Second Illyrian War: Illyria was finally conquered in 168 BC
  3. Diocletian Palace
  4. List of Croatian rulers PDF, University of Michigan
  5. Klaić V., Povijest Hrvata, Knjiga Prva, Druga, Treća, Četvrta i Peta Zagreb 1982.
  6. The arrival of Croats in Balkan peninsula is not well documented. Citations from De Administrando Imperio are controversial and disputed by some historians.
  7. Constantine Porphyrogenitus, De Administrando Imperio, ed. Gy. Moravcsik, trans. R.J.H. Jenkins, rev. ed., Washington, Dumbarton Oaks Center for Byzantine Studies, 1967.
  8. Royal Frankish Annales Annales Regni Francorum ed. G. H. Pertz. Monumenta Germanicae Historica, Scriptores rerum Germanicarum 6, (Hannover 1895) for the years 819-822.
  9. Norwich, John Julius. A History of Venice. Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1982.
  10. Hrvatski leksikon (1996-1997)
  11. Copy of the Duke Trpimir's document
  12. Fine, John Van Antwerp (p.257): The" target="_blank"> early medieval Balkans : a critical survey from the sixth to the late twelfth century" University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0472081497 ISBN 9780472081493
  13. H.T. Norris (1994). Islam in the Balkans, C. Hurst & Co. Publishers, ISBN 1-85065-167-1
  14. Stjepan Antoljak, Pregled hrvatske povijesti, Split 1993., str. 43.
  15. Croatian History geocities.com
  16. It is possible that Tomislav was crowned earlier, as pope sent him a letter in which he was mentioned as a rex Croatorum in 925.
  17. Frederick Bernard Singleton (1985). "A Short History of the Yugoslav Peoples", Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-27485-0
  18. ...audivit de Cressimiro Chroatorum principe quod dolo necari fecisset Goislavum fratrem suum misso apocrisario Mainardo...
  19. Stjepan II (1089 - 1091) royalcroatia
  20. Petar Svacic (c.1091- 1097) royalcroatia
  21. Fine, John Van Antwerp: "The Late Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest" University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0472082604
  22. Frederic Chapin Lane (1973). Venice, a Maritime Republic, Johns Hopkins University Press, ISBN 0-8018-1460-X
  23. Prošlost Klisa
  24. 750th Anniversary of the Golden Bull Granted by Bela IV
  25. M. Šašić, »Zlatna bula« - temelj razvoja Zagreba kroz stoljeća, Vjesnik, 17. studenog 1998.
  26. Hrvatski sabor
  27. Šubići bribirski do gubitka nasljedne banske Damir Karbić
  28. http://numizmatika.antikviteti.net/pojma/s1.html
  29. Križevci Bloody Assembly krizevci.eu
  30. Kingdom of Croatia AD 925 - 1918 European Kingdoms
  31. http://www.zum.de/whkmla/region/balkans/croat13011526.html History: 1301 to 1526 AD
  32. Democratic Transition in Croatia: Value Transformation, Education & Media By Sabrina P. Ramet, Davorka Matic, pg. xii
  33. Battle of Krbava field
  34. Font, Marta:Hungarian Kingdom and Croatia in the Middle Age
  35. R. W. SETON -WATSON:The southern Slav question and the Habsburg Monarchy page 18
  36. Milan Kruhek: Cetin, grad izbornog sabora Kraljevine Hrvatske 1527, Karlovačka Županija, 1997, Karlovac
  37. [1] Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers, Item 548456
  38. Turnbull, Stephen. The Ottoman Empire 1326 - 1699. New York: Osprey, 2003. 57
  39. Moačanin, Nenad: Some Problems of Interpretation of Turkish Sources concerning the Battle of Sisak in 1593. In: Nazor, Ante et al.(ed.), Sisačka bitka 1593, Proceedings of the Meeting from 06/18/93 to 06/19/93. Zagreb-Sisak 1994 ISBN/ISSN 9-531-75024-4, pp. 125 - 130
  40. http://www.posta.hr/main.aspx?id=193&idmarke=1852
  41. http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/162/
  42. Barbara Jelavich (1983), History of the Balkans: Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-27458-3
  43. Govor Ivana Kukuljevića Sakcinskog u Saboru 2. svibnja 1843. Hrvatski sabor
  44. "Zahtijevanja naroda" Hrvatski sabor



Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message