The Full Wiki

More info on Tom Humphries

Tom Humphries: Map

Advertisements
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



Tom Humphries was a sportswriter and columnist whose schizoid alter-ego now writes for The Irish Times. He lives in Dublinmarker with Mary and his two children, Molly and Caitlín.

Humphries, born in London, grew up in Foxfield,Rahenymarker, on the northside of Dublin, and was educated at St. Joseph's Christian Brothers School, Fairviewmarker (alma mater of politicians Charles Haughey, John A. Costello and George Colley). Attending University College Dublinmarker (UCD) he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Commerce and a Higher Diploma in Education. A notable student's union politician, Humphries ran for the office of University College Dublin Students Union Education Officer. After teaching for a period he entered journalism.

His name came to international prominence when he interviewed Irish football player Roy Keane in Saipanmarker in May 2002, as Ireland were preparing to take part in the World Cup in South Koreamarker and Japanmarker. Originally his intention had been to write an article based on the interview, but such were the nature Keane’s revelations, in particular his thoughts on the Irish team’s preparations for the World Cup and the attitude of the management, players and the FAI (Football Association of Ireland), that the article appeared as a verbatim transcript of the interview, starting on the front page of The Irish Times (an almost unheard of concession) and continuing in full on the inner pages. The resulting furore caused Keane, the preeminent Irish player of his generation, to resign from the squad at the same time as being sent home by the Irish football team manager, Mick McCarthy, before the World Cup started.

His book 'Lap Top Dancing and the Nanny Goat Mambo' was published in 2003 and was an account of his year spent covering sporting events in 2002, including the Saipanmarker events and the Champions League Final. He was also one of the first Irish journalists to question the validity of Michelle Smith’s swimming success in the 1996 Olympics . To this day he regularly mentions Smith in his columns.

Besides his regular sports reporting and feature articles, Humphries writes a Monday column in the Irish Times called 'Lockerroom'. This column is now synonimous with incitement to violence in sport (IT 30Nov09). Furthermore this column is adverse to the only sport at which an Irish team has been extraordinarily successful,namely Rugby. Allegedly recent visits to his psychoanalyst have determined that Tom is now a lost cause and a medical first. While a true diagnosis has proved impossible his condition resembles schitzophrenic sciolism (IT 30Nov09), presenting a pretentious attitude of superficial knowledgeability coupled with an uncontrolled outpouring of verbal diahorea.

'Green Fields: Gaelic Sport in Ireland' was Humphries' first book and is an analysis of the importance of the GAA in modern Ireland, a recurring theme of his work.

He was ghost writer on Irish footballer Niall Quinn's autobiography Niall Quinn - The Autobiography, published in 2002 and nominated for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award.

A collection of his Irish Times and Sports Illustrated writings was published in 2004 as 'Booked!' and was nominated for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award. All royalties from the book went to Amnesty International.

Humpries wrote the book 'Dublin V Kerry', an account of the series of historic clashes between the two dominant teams in Gaelic Football of the mid to late 1970s.

He coauthored Come What May, Donal Og Cusack's autobiography.

He detests the League of Ireland and rugby.

References



Bibliography

    • Green Fields: Gaelic Sport in Ireland (Weidenfeld Nicolson Illustrated , ISBN 978-0297835660, 1996)
    • Laptop Dancing and the Nanny Goat Mambo: A Sportswriter’s Year (Pocket Books/Town House, ISBN 1-903650-53-4, 2003)
    • Booked! (V. Carefully) Selected Writings (Town House, ISBN 1-86059-212-0, 2004)
    • Dublin V Kerry (Penguin Ireland, ISBN 1844880850, 2006)



Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message