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United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas: Map

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Closer view of the federal courthouse in Texarkana.
The United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas (in case citations, W.D. Ark.) is a United States District Court with jurisdiction over the western half of the state of Arkansasmarker. The court is further subdivided into six divisions, which collectively cover 34 Arkansas counties.

Appeals from the Western District of Arkansas are heard by the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).

History

Arkansas was originally part of the Louisiana Purchase, and became part of the Territory of Missouri in 1812, when Louisianamarker became a state. When Missourimarker became a state in 1819, a territorial government, including a territorial court, was organized for Arkansas, taking effect on July 4, 1819. The United States District Court for the District of Arkansas was established with a single judge when Arkansas became a state, on June 15, 1836, by 5 Stat. 50, 51. The court was subdivided into Eastern and Western Districts on March 3, 1851, by 9 Stat. 594.

The court's headquarters and one of its divisions is based in Fort Smith, Arkansasmarker. Famous "hanging judge" Isaac Parker presided over this court in Fort Smith; the former barracks that served as his courthouse and jail is now part of Fort Smith National Historic Sitemarker. The court presently sits in a nearby Federal office building named after Parker.

Another division of the court in Texarkana, Arkansasmarker shares with the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas the only federal courthouse in the United States to sit in two states.

Judges

  • As of October 31, 2008, a vacancy exists in the Western District of Arkansas due to Judge Harry F. Barnes' decision to assume senior status. No replacement nomination is pending at this time.


  • As of August 14, 2009, a second vacancy exists in the District due to the decision of Judge Robert T. Dawson to assume senior status. No replacement nomination is pending at this time.


Judge Appointed by Began active
service
Ended active
service
Ended senior
status
End reason
Morris S. Arnold Ronald Reagan reappointment
Richard S. Arnold Jimmy Carter reappointment
Harry F. Barnes Bill Clinton Incumbent
Henry Clay Caldwell Abraham Lincoln assignment to another court
Robert T. Dawson Bill Clinton August 14, 2009 }}Incumbent
Oren Harris Lyndon B. Johnson death
Jimm Larry Hendren George H. W. Bush Incumbent
Jesse Smith Henley Dwight D. Eisenhower reappointment
George Howard Jr. Jimmy Carter assignment to another court
Harry Jacob Lemley Franklin D. Roosevelt death
John E. Miller Franklin D. Roosevelt death
Isaac Parker Ulysses S. Grant death
Heartsill Ragon Franklin D. Roosevelt death
Daniel Ringo Zachary Taylor resignation
John Henry Rogers Grover Cleveland death
Elsijane Trimble Roy Jimmy Carter assignment to another court
Terry Lee Shell Gerald Ford death
William Story Ulysses S. Grant resignation
Hugh Franklin Waters Ronald Reagan death
Paul X. Williams Lyndon B. Johnson death
Susan Webber Wright George H. W. Bush assignment to another court
Frank A. Youmans William Howard Taft death


Notes

  1. Lynn Foster, Their Pride and Ornament: Judge Benjamin Johnson and the Federal Courts in Early Arkansas, 22 U. Ark. Little Rock L. Rev. 21 (1999).
  2. U.S. District Courts of Arkansas, Legislative history, Federal Judicial Center.
  3. Asbury Dickens, A Synoptical Index to the Laws and Treaties of the United States of America (1852), p. 390.
  4. Alfred Conkling, A Treatise on the Organization, Jurisdiction and Practice of the Courts of the United States (1864), p. 179.
  5. Recess appointment; formally nominated on December 21, 1849, confirmed by the United States Senate on June 10, 1850, and received commission on June 10, 1850.
  6. Recess appointment; formally nominated on December 8, 1896, confirmed by the United States Senate on December 15, 1896, and received commission on December 15, 1896.


See also



External links




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