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United States congressional delegations from Mississippi: Map

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These are tables of congressional delegations from Mississippimarker to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.



United States Senate

Class 1 Senators Congress Class 2 Senators
Walter Leake (DR) 15th (1817–1819) Thomas Hill Williams (DR)
16th (1819–1821)
David Holmes (DR)
17th (1821–1823)
18th (1823–1825)
19th (1825–1827)
Powhatan Ellis (DR)
Thomas Buck Reed (DR)
Powhatan Ellis (DR) 20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831) Thomas Buck Reed (DR)
Robert H. Adams (DR)
George Poindexter (DR)
22nd (1831–1833)
John Black (W)
23rd (1833–1835)
24th (1835–1837) Robert J. Walker (DR)
25th (1837–1839)
James F. Trotter (D)
Thomas Hickman Williams (D)
John Henderson (W) 26th (1839–1841)
27th (1841–1843)
28th (1843–1845)
Jesse Speight (D) 29th (1845–1847)
Joseph W. Chalmers (D)
30th (1847–1849) Henry Stuart Foote (D)
Jefferson Davis (D)
31st (1849–1851)
John J. McRae (D) 32nd (1851–1853)
Stephen Adams (D) Walker Brooke (W)
33rd (1853–1855) Albert G. Brown (D)
34th (1855–1857)
Jefferson Davis (D) 35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861)
American Civil War 37th (1861–1863) American Civil War
38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869)
Adelbert Ames (R) 41st (1869–1871) Hiram R. Revels (R)
42nd (1871–1873) James L. Alcorn (R)
43rd (1873–1875)
Henry R. Pease (R)
Blanche K. Bruce (R) 44th (1875–1877)
45th (1877–1879) L.Q.C. Lamar (D)
46th (1879–1881)
James Z. George (D) 47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
Edward C. Walthall (D)
50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895)
Anselm J. McLaurin (D)
54th (1895–1897) Edward C. Walthall (D)
55th (1897–1899)
Hernando D. Money (D) William V. Sullivan (D)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903) Anselm J. McLaurin (D)
58th (1903–1905)
59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911)
James Gordon (D)
Le Roy Percy (D)
John Sharp Williams (D) 62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915) James K. Vardaman (D)
64th (1915–1917)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921) Pat Harrison (D)
67th (1921–1923)
Hubert D. Stephens (D) 68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)
Theodore G. Bilbo (D) 74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
James O. Eastland (D)
Wall Doxey (D)
78th (1943–1945) James O. Eastland (D)
79th (1945–1947)
80th (1947–1949)
John C. Stennis (D)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
Thad Cochran (R)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)
Trent Lott (R) 101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
Roger Wicker (R)
111th (2009–2011)


United States House of Representatives

1801 - 1817: 1 non-voting delegate

On April 7, 1798, the Mississippi Territory was created. Starting in 1801, the Territory sent one non-voting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives.
Congress
7th

(1801–1803)
Narsworthy Hunter
Thomas M. Greene

8th

(1803–1805)
William Lattimore

9th

(1805–1807)

10th

(1807–1809)
George Poindexter

11th

(1809–1811)

12th

(1811–1813)

13th

(1813–1815)
William Lattimore

14th

(1815–1817)



1817 - 1833: 1 seat

On December 10, 1817, Mississippi was admitted into the Union as a state and sent one Representative to Congress, elected at-large state-wide.

Congress
15th

(1817–1819)
George Poindexter
16th

(1819–1821)
Christopher Rankin
17th

(1821–1823)
18th

(1823–1825)
19th

(1825–1827)
William Haile
20th

(1827–1829)
Thomas Hinds (D)
21st

(1829–1831)
22nd

(1831–1833)
Franklin E. Plummer (J)



1833 - 1843: 2 seats

After the 1830 census, Mississippi had two seats, elected state-wide at-large on a general ticket.

Congress Elected state-wide at-large on a general ticket


23rd

(1833–1835)
Franklin E. Plummer (J) Harry Cage (J)

24th

(1835–1837)
David Dickson (W) John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne (J)
Samuel Jameson Gholson (D)

25th

(1837–1839)
Thomas Jefferson Word (W) Seargent S. Prentiss (W)

26th

(1839–1841)
Jacob Thompson (D) Albert G. Brown (D)

27th

(1841–1843)
William M. Gwin (D)



1843 - 1853: 4 seats

Starting in 1843, Mississippi's delegation was increased to four seats, still elected at-large state-wide on a general ticket. After 1845, those seats were elected by representative districts.

Congress Elected state-wide at-large on a general ticket
28th

(1843–1845)
Jacob Thompson (D) William Henry Hammett (D) Robert W. Roberts (D) Tilghman Tucker (D)

District
29th

(1845–1847)
Jacob Thompson (D) Stephen Adams (D) Robert W. Roberts (D) Jefferson Davis (D)
Henry Thomas Ellett (D)
30th

(1847–1849)
Winfield Scott Featherston (D) Patrick Watson Tompkins (W) Albert G. Brown (D)
31st

(1849–1851)
William McWillie (D)
32nd

(1851–1853)
Benjamin D. Nabers (U) John A. Wilcox (U) John D. Freeman (U)



1853 - 1873: 5 seats

Congress District


33rd

(1853–1855)
Daniel Boone Wright (D) William T. S. Barry (D) Otho Robards Singleton (D) Wiley Pope Harris (D) William Barksdale (D)

34th

(1855–1857)
Hendley Stone Bennett (D) William Barksdale (D) William Augustus Lake John A. Quitman (D)

35th

(1857–1859)
Lucius Q. C. Lamar (D) Reuben Davis (D) Otho Robards Singleton (D)
John Jones McRae (D)

36th

(1859–1861)

37th

(1861–1863)
American Civil War

38th

(1863–1865)

39th

(1865–1867)

40th

(1867–1869)

41st

(1869–1871)
George Emrick Harris (R) Joseph Lewish Morphis (R) Henry W. Barry (R) George Colin McKee (R) Legrand Winfield Perce (R)
42nd

(1871–1873)



1873 - 1883: 6 seats

Congress District


43rd

(1873–1875)
Lucius Q. C. Lamar (D) Albert Richards Howe (R) Henry W. Barry (R) Jason Niles (R) George Colin McKee (R) John R. Lynch (R)

44th

(1875–1877)
Guilford Wiley Wells (Independent) (R) Hernando D. Money (D) Otho Robards Singleton (D) Charles E. Hooker (D)

45th

(1877–1879)
Henry Lowndes Muldrow (D) Van H. Manning (D) James Ronald Chalmers (D)

46th

(1879–1881)

47th

(1881–1883)
John R. Lynch (R)



1883 - 1903: 7 seats

Congress District


48th

(1883–1885)
Henry Lowndes Muldrow (D) Elza Jeffords (R) Hernando D. Money (D) Otho Robards Singleton (D) Henry Smith Van Eaton (D) Ethelbert Barksdale (D)
James Ronald Chalmers (Independent)

49th

(1885–1887)
John Mills Allen (D) James B. Morgan (D) Thomas C. Catchings (D) Frederick G. Barry (D)
50th

(1887–1889)
Chapman L. Anderson (D) T. R. Stockdale (D) Charles E. Hooker (D)

51st

(1889–1891)
Clarke Lewis (D)

52nd

(1891–1893)
John C. Kyle (D) Joseph Henry Beeman (D)

53rd

(1893–1895)
Hernando D. Money (D) John Sharp Williams (D)

54th

(1895–1897)
Walter McKennon Denny (D) James G. Spencer (D)

55th

(1897–1899)
William V. Sullivan (D) Andrew F. Fox (D) William F. Love (D) Patrick Henry (D)
Thomas Spight (D) Frank A. McLain (D)

56th

(1899–1901)

57th

(1901–1903)
Ezekiel S. Candler, Jr. (D) Patrick Stevens Henry (D) Charles E. Hooker (D)



1903 - 1933: 8 seats

For these three decades, Mississippi had eight seats, the most it has ever been apportioned.

Congress District


58th

(1903–1905)
Ezekiel S. Candler, Jr. (D) Thomas Spight (D) Benjamin G. Humphreys II (D) Wilson S. Hill (D) Adam M. Byrd (D) Eaton J. Bowers (D) Frank A. McLain (D) John Sharp Williams (D)

59th

(1905–1907)

60th

(1907–1909)

61st

(1909–1911)
Thomas U. Sisson (D) William A. Dickson (D) James W. Collier (D)

62nd

(1911–1913)
Hubert D. Stephens (D) Samuel Andrew Witherspoon (D) Pat Harrison (D)

63rd

(1913–1915)
Percy E. Quin (D)

64th

(1915–1917)
William Webb Venable (D)

65th

(1917–1919)

66th

(1919–1921)
Paul B. Johnson, Sr. (D)

67th

(1921–1923)
John E. Rankin (D) Bill G. Lowrey (D) Ross A. Collins (D)

68th

(1923–1925)
T. Jeff Busby (D) T. Webber Wilson (D)
William Y. Humphreys (D)

69th

(1925–1927)
William M. Whittington (D)

70th

(1927–1929)

71st

(1929–1931)
Wall Doxey (D) Robert S. Hall (D)

72nd

(1931–1933)
Lawrence Russell Ellzey (D)



1933 - 1953: 7 seats

Congress District


73rd

(1933–1935)
John E. Rankin (D) Wall Doxey (D) William M. Whittington (D) T. Jeff Busby (D) Ross A. Collins (D) William M. Colmer (D) Lawrence Russell Ellzey (D)

74th

(1935–1937)
Aaron L. Ford (D) Aubert C. Dunn (D) Dan R. McGehee (D)

75th

(1937–1939)
Ross A. Collins (D)

76th

(1939–1941)

77th

(1941–1943)
Jamie L. Whitten (D)

78th

(1943–1945)
Thomas G. Abernethy (D) W. Arthur Winstead (D)

79th

(1945–1947)

80th

(1947–1949)
John B. Williams (D)

81st

(1949–1951)

82nd

(1951–1953)
Frank E. Smith (D)



1953 - 1963: 6 seats

Congress District


83rd

(1953–1955)
Thomas G. Abernethy (D) Jamie L. Whitten (D) Frank E. Smith (D) John B. Williams (D) W. Arthur Winstead (D) William M. Colmer (D)

84th

(1955–1957)

85th

(1957–1959)

86th

(1959–1961)

87th

(1961–1963)



1963 - 2003: 5 seats

Congress District


88th

(1963–1965)
Thomas G. Abernethy (D) Jamie L. Whitten (D) John B. Williams (D) W. Arthur Winstead (D) William M. Colmer (D)

89th

(1965–1967)
Prentiss Walker (R)

90th

(1967–1969)
Sonny Montgomery (D)
Charles H. Griffin (D)

91st

(1969–1971)

92nd

(1971–1973)

93rd

(1973–1975)
Jamie L. Whitten (D) David R. Bowen (D) Sonny Montgomery (D) Thad Cochran (R) Trent Lott (R)

94th

(1975–1977)

95th

(1977–1979)

96th

(1979–1981)
Jon Hinson (R)

97th

(1981–1983)
Wayne Dowdy (D)

98th

(1983–1985)
William W. Franklin (R)

99th

(1985–1987)

100th

(1987–1989)
Mike Espy (D)

101st

(1989–1991)
Mike Parker (D) Larkin I. Smith (R)
Gene Taylor (D)

102nd

(1991–1993)

103rd

(1993–1995)
Bennie G. Thompson (D)

104th

(1995–1997)
Roger F. Wicker (R) Mike Parker (R)

105th

(1997–1999)
Chip Pickering (R)

106th

(1999–2001)
Ronnie Shows (D)

107th

(2001–2003)



2003 - present: 4 seats

Congress District


108th

(2003–2005)
Roger Wicker (R) Bennie G. Thompson (D) Chip Pickering (R) Gene Taylor (D)

109th

(2005–2007)

110th

(2007–2009)
Travis Childers (D)
111th

(2009–2011)
Gregg Harper (R)


Notes

  1. Christopher Rankin died March 14, 1826.
  2. William Haile resigned September 12, 1828.
  3. David Dickinson died July 31, 1836.
  4. Claibourne's and Gholson's elections in 1836 were contested due to election irregularities. The House set aside both contests, and vacated both seats February 5, 1838.
  5. Jefferson Davis resigned in June 1846 to enlist in the Mexican-American War.
  6. William Barksdale, Reuben Davis, Otho Robards Singleton and John Jones McRae all resigned on January 12, 1861 upon Mississippi's secession.
  7. John A. Quitman died July 17, 1858.
  8. Lucius Q. C. Lamar resigned in December 1860 to support the growing secession movement.
  9. James Ronald Chalmers successfully contested the election of Van H. Manning.
  10. John R. Lynch successfully contested the election of James Ronald Chalmers.
  11. William V. Sullivan resigned May 31, 1898 as he was appointed to the Senate.
  12. William F. Love died October 16, 1898.
  13. Benjamin G. Humphreys II died October 16, 1923.
  14. Samuel A. Witherspoon died November 24, 1915.
  15. Percy E. Quin died February 4, 1932.
  16. Wall Doxey resigned September 23, 1941 as he was elected to the Senate in a special election.
  17. John B. Williams resigned January 16, 1968 as he was elected Governor of Mississippi.
  18. Jon Hinson resigned April 13, 1981.
  19. Mike Espy resigned January 22, 1993 as he was appointed U.S. Secretary of Agriculture.
  20. Larkin I. Smith died August 13, 1989.
  21. Roger Wicker resigned on December 31, 2007 as he was appointed to the U.S. Senate.


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