The Full Wiki

More info on United States presidential election in Pennsylvania, 2008

United States presidential election in Pennsylvania, 2008: Map

Advertisements
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



The 2008 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania took place on November 4, 2008 throughout all 50 states and D.C.marker, which was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 21 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President.

Pennsylvaniamarker was won by Democrat nominee Barack Obama with a 10.3% margin of victory. The state was heavily targeted by both campaigns. Although, it was generally considered as "leaning Obama" or a blue state during the final week of the 2008 election, by The Takeaway.org, which assessed 15 different news organizations that made state by state predictions. Although the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has voted for the Democratic presidential nominee in every election since 1992, the margins of victory have become smaller over the past elections, as was highlighted in 2004 when John Kerry won the Keystone State by a slim margin of 2.50 percent. Since George W. Bush came so close to winning the state in 2004 and due to the fact that Barack Obama lost the Pennsylvania Democratic Primary to Hillary Rodham Clinton by nearly 10 percentage points in April 2008, many analysts believed that Republican John McCain had a decent shot at winning Pennsylvania in the general election. Nevertheless, Pennsylvania remained blue and gave Obama 54.48% of the vote.

Primaries



Campaign

Polling

Both McCain and Obama lead in various state polls taken from February until the end of April, when Obama took a steady, moderate lead in the state polling. Obama's lead was temporarily reduced to within margins of error and ties when Governor Sarah Palin of Alaskamarker was announced as McCain's running mate in late August, but when the financial crisis of 2008 became a more potent election issue near the end of September, Obama then took a double-digit lead in the state polls, causing many analysts to no longer consider Pennsylvania a swing state in 2008. Nevertheless, John McCain campaigned heavily in the state near Election Day and some polls showed Obama's lead narrowing down to single digits. McCain hoped that Pennsylvania might be the swing state that ensured him a narrow victory. However, the economic crisis weighed heavily on the minds of voters across the country and in Pennsylvania it was no different where many voters blamed the Republicans and Wall Streetmarker for the collapse, ultimately helping Obama who ended up carrying Pennsylvania by a strong margin of 10.31%.

Fundraising

Obama raised $14,043,740. McCain raised $5,188,757.

Advertising and visits

Obama spent almost $42 million, while McCain spent almost $30 million. The Obama campaign visited the state 16 times. The McCain campaign visited here 31 times.

Analysis

McCain did win more counties than Obama, but the counties carried by Obama were by far the most populated of the state, including Philadelphiamarker and Alleghenymarker, home of the cities of Philadelphiamarker and Pittsburghmarker respectively.

Obama did extremely well throughout eastern Pennsylvania. He won more than 80% of voters in the city of Philadelphia, and two of its suburban counties gave him three-to-two margins (the other suburban counties also voted for Obama). Democratic margins from Philadelphia and its suburbs were more than enough to ensure Obama's victory even if he had lost all the rest of the state. North of Philadelphia, the heavily industrialized, pro-union counties characterized by cities such as Scrantonmarker (birthplace of Obama's running mate, Joe Biden), Wilkes-Barremarker and Allentown strongly backed Obama as well. He also managed to win two traditionally Republican counties in the eastern part of the state, Dauphin (home to the state capital, Harrisburgmarker) and Berks (home to Readingmarker); the last Democrat to carry these counties was Lyndon Johnson in 1964. In addition, Obama remained competitive in the two strongest Republican counties: Lancaster Countymarker (which gave George W. Bush his largest margin of victory in the entire state) and York Countymarker. While John Kerry lost Lancaster by 32 percentage points, Obama lost the county by only 12%, a substantial improvement.

John McCain, however, did best in Southwestern Pennsylvania (around Pittsburgh), a part of Appalachia and the central, rural "T". Central Pennsylvania is a Republican stronghold; John McCain won the vast majority of its counties, often by substantial margins. However, Southwestern Pennsylvania, until recently, was the most Democratic region of the state (except for Philadelphia). Historically, when a Democrat carries Pennsylvania, the entire lower-left corner of the state from Pittsburgh to Johnstownmarker is coated blue. The heavily unionized, Appalachian counties in and around Pittsburgh strongly voted against Ronald Reagan in 1984; in that election the only other county in the state to vote Democratic was Philadelphia. In 2008, however, the Republicans won every single county in Southwestern Pennsylvania except for Allegheny Countymarker, home to Pittsburgh (which voted Democratic by 15%). It was one of the few regions in which Obama did worse than John Kerry. This was not surprising, though, seeing as how Obama consistently struggled in Appalachia throughout the course of the Democratic primary when voters in this region strongly backed Hillary Rodham Clinton.

During the same election at the state level, Democrats picked up two seats in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives but Republicans picked up one seat in the Pennsylvania Senate. Democrats also picked up a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in Pennsylvania's 3rd Congressional District as Democrat Kathy Dahlkemper defeated seven-term incumbent Republican Phil English by a 2.48-percent margin of victory. Dahlkemper received 51.24% of the vote while English took in 48.76%.

Results

United States presidential election in Pennsylvania, 2008
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 3,276,363 54.48% 21
Republican John McCain Sarah Palin 2,655,885 44.17% 0
Independent Ralph Nader Matt Gonzalez 42,977 0.71% 0
Libertarian Bob Barr Wayne Allyn Root 19,912 0.33% 0
Write-ins Write-ins 16,413 0.27% 0
Others Others 1,267 0.02% 0
Constitution Chuck Baldwin Darrell Castle 542 0.01% 0
Green Cynthia McKinney Rosa Clemente 38 0.00% 0
Totals 6,013,397 100.00% 21
Voter turnout


Results breakdown

By county

County Obama% Obama# McCain% McCain# Others% Others#
Adamsmarker 39.4% 17,633 58.9% 26,349 1.7% 759
Alleghenymarker 57.1% 373,153 41.6% 272,347 1.3% 8,539
Armstrongmarker 36.8% 11,138 61.3% 18,542 1.9% 583
Beavermarker 47.6% 40,499 50.4% 42,895 1.9% 1,638
Bedfordmarker 27.0% 6,059 71.8% 16,124 1.2% 260
Berksmarker 53.8% 97,047 44.6% 80,513 1.6% 2,951
Blairmarker 37.2% 19,813 61.4% 32,708 1.5% 777
Bradfordmarker 39.8% 10,306 58.2% 15,057 2.0% 524
Bucksmarker 53.7% 179,031 45.1% 150,248 1.2% 4,045
Butlermarker 35.5% 32,260 62.9% 57,074 1.6% 1,427
Cambriamarker 49.2% 32,451 48.5% 31,995 2.4% 1,560
Cameronmarker 39.2% 879 58.9% 1,323 1.9% 43
Carbonmarker 49.8% 13,464 47.9% 12,957 2.3% 629
Centremarker 55.1% 41,950 43.3% 32,992 1.5% 1,169
Chestermarker 54.0% 137,833 44.8% 114,421 1.2% 2,998
Clarionmarker 37.8% 6,756 60.1% 10,737 2.1% 383
Clearfieldmarker 42.8% 14,555 54.9% 18,662 2.4% 805
Clintonmarker 48.0% 7,097 50.7% 7,504 1.3% 190
Columbiamarker 46.8% 13,230 51.2% 14,477 2.0% 571
Crawfordmarker 43.8% 16,780 54.2% 20,750 2.0% 777
Cumberlandmarker 42.5% 48,306 56.0% 63,739 1.5% 1,737
Dauphinmarker 53.9% 69,975 44.9% 58,238 1.3% 1,632
Delawaremarker 60.2% 178,870 38.8% 115,273 1.0% 2,861
Elkmarker 50.8% 7,290 46.5% 6,676 2.8% 396
Eriemarker 59.1% 75,775 39.3% 50,351 1.7% 2,145
Fayettemarker 49.2% 25,866 49.6% 26,081 1.2% 613
Forestmarker 42.1% 1,038 55.3% 1,366 2.6% 64
Franklinmarker 33.1% 21,169 65.6% 41,906 1.3% 842
Fultonmarker 25.0% 1,576 73.6% 4,642 1.4% 88
Greenemarker 48.6% 7,829 49.0% 7,889 2.5% 396
Huntingdonmarker 35.3% 6,621 62.7% 11,745 1.9% 365
Indianamarker 45.7% 17,065 52.9% 19,727 1.4% 510
Jeffersonmarker 34.1% 6,447 63.8% 12,057 2.2% 407
Juniatamarker 31.3% 3,068 66.0% 6,484 2.7% 265
Lackawannamarker 62.2% 67,520 36.4% 39,488 1.4% 1,531
Lancastermarker 43.4% 99,586 55.2% 126,568 1.4% 3,095
Lawrencemarker 46.5% 19,711 51.6% 21,851 1.9% 787
Lebanonmarker 39.8% 23,310 58.6% 34,314 1.6% 939
Lehighmarker 57.1% 87,089 41.6% 63,382 1.3% 2,002
Luzernemarker 53.3% 72,492 45.0% 61,127 1.7% 2,349
Lycomingmarker 37.2% 18,381 61.2% 30,280 1.6% 786
McKeanmarker 40.5% 6,465 57.8% 9,224 1.6% 258
Mercermarker 48.8% 26,411 49.0% 26,565 2.2% 1,192
Mifflinmarker 32.6% 5,375 66.2% 10,929 1.2% 198
Monroemarker 57.5% 39,453 41.2% 28,293 1.3% 872
Montgomerymarker 60.0% 253,393 39.2% 165,552 0.8% 3,474
Montourmarker 41.9% 3,364 57.0% 4,574 1.1% 85
Northamptonmarker 55.4% 75,255 43.1% 58,551 1.6% 2,148
Northumberlandmarker 42.0% 14,329 55.7% 19,018 2.2% 767
Perrymarker 32.2% 6,396 65.8% 13,058 2.0% 394
Philadelphiamarker 83.0% 595,980 16.3% 117,221 0.7% 4,767
Pikemarker 47.3% 11,493 51.5% 12,518 1.1% 273
Pottermarker 30.6% 2,300 68.1% 5,109 1.3% 98
Schuylkillmarker 44.5% 28,300 53.1% 33,767 2.4% 1,538
Snydermarker 34.6% 5,382 63.6% 9,900 1.8% 284
Somersetmarker 36.4% 12,878 61.3% 21,686 2.3% 804
Sullivanmarker 39.5% 1,233 59.0% 1,841 1.5% 46
Susquehannamarker 43.2% 8,381 54.8% 10,633 2.1% 401
Tiogamarker 35.5% 6,390 63.0% 11,326 1.5% 268
Unionmarker 42.0% 7,333 56.4% 9,859 1.6% 283
Venangomarker 39.4% 9,238 58.5% 13,718 2.1% 504
Warrenmarker 46.1% 8,537 52.3% 9,685 1.6% 295
Washingtonmarker 46.8% 46,122 51.5% 50,752 1.6% 1,597
Waynemarker 43.3% 9,892 55.6% 12,702 1.1% 241
Westmorelandmarker 41.0% 72,721 57.6% 102,294 1.4% 2,532
Wyomingmarker 45.3% 5,985 52.8% 6,983 1.9% 254
Yorkmarker 42.4% 82,839 56.0% 109,268 1.6% 3,138


By congressional district

Although Barack Obama won Pennsylvania, John McCain carried 10 of the commonwealth’s 19 congressional districts, including four districts held by Democrats. One district, PA-03, was extremely close, however, with McCain only winning by less than 20 votes.

District McCain Obama Representative
11.72% 87.82% Bob Brady
9.52% 90.05% Chaka Fattah
49.30% 49.30% Phil English (110th Congress)
Kathy Dahlkemper (111th Congress)
54.72% 44.27% Jason Altmire
54.55% 44.05% John E. Peterson (110th Congress)
Glenn "G.T." Thompson (111th Congress)
41.21% 57.81% Jim Gerlach
43.20% 55.84% Joe Sestak
44.99% 53.92% Patrick Murphy
63.36% 35.43% Bill Shuster
53.60% 45.17% Chris Carney
44.99% 53.92% Paul E. Kanjorski
49.43% 49.12% John Murtha
40.51% 58.56% Allyson Schwartz
29.03% 69.99% Michael F. Doyle
43.14% 55.58% Charlie Dent
51.39% 47.74% Joe Pitts
51.10% 47.65% Tim Holden
54.90% 44.15% Tim Murphy
56.25% 42.64% Todd Platts


Electors

Technically the voters of Pennsylvania cast their ballots for electors: representatives to the Electoral College. Pennsylvania is allocated 21 electors because it has 19 congressional districts and 2 senators. All candidates who appear on the ballot or qualify to receive write-in votes must submit a list of 21 electors, who pledge to vote for their candidate and his or her running mate. Whoever wins the majority of votes in the state is awarded all 21 electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for President and Vice President. Although electors are pledged to their candidate and running mate, they are not obligated to vote for them. An elector who votes for someone other than his or her candidate is known as a faithless elector.

The electors of each state and the District of Columbiamarker met on December 15, 2008 to cast their votes for President and Vice President. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols.

The following were the members of the Electoral College from the state. All 5 were pledged to Barack Obama and Joe Biden:
  • Lynne Abraham Philadelphia County
  • Christopher Lewis Chester County
  • John S Brenne York County
  • Valerie McDonald-Roberts Allegheny County
  • Eileen Connell Dauphin County
  • Thomas McMahon Berks County
  • Kathi Cozzone Chester County
  • Robert Mello Lackawanna County
  • John K Fetterman Allegheny County
  • Michael A. Nutter Philadelphia County
  • William George Cumberland County
  • Corey D. O'Brien Lackawanna County
  • Patrick Gillespie Delaware County
  • Joshua Shapiro Montgomery County
  • J Richard Gray Lancaster County
  • Jack Wagner Allegheny County
  • Franco Harris Allegheny County
  • Michael J. Washo Lackawanna County
  • George Hartwick Dauphin County
  • Wendell Young Montgomery County
  • Daylin Leach Montgomery County


References

  1. http://vote2008.thetakeaway.org/2008/09/20/track-the-electoral-college-vote-predictions/
  2. http://www.fec.gov/DisclosureSearch/MapAppState.do?stateName=PA&cand_id=P00000001
  3. http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/map/ad.spending/
  4. http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/map/candidate.visits/
  5. http://www.dos.state.pa.us/elections/cwp/view.asp?a=1315&q=447065&electionsNav=|#electors


See also


Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message