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Variations of pink: Map

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This article is about notable tints and shades of the color pink. These various colors are shown below.

Computer web color pinks

Pink

At right is displayed web color pink.

This color is identical to the color Tamarisk, the color of the flowers of the Tamarisk plant.

Light pink

At right is displayed the color light pink, web color lightpink.

Although this color is called "light pink", as can be ascertained by inspecting its hex code, it is actually a slightly deeper, not a lighter, tint of pink than the color pink itself. A more accurate name for it in terms of traditional color nomenclature would therefore be medium pink.

Hot pink

At right is displayed the web color hotpink (no space).

Deep pink

At right is displayed the web color deeppink (no space).

Other notable pink colors

Chart of notable pink colors

Displayed at right is a chart of notable pink colors (other than computer web color pinks). These colors are discussed in more detail below.

Pale pink

At right is displayed the color pale pink, a light, desaturated shade of pink.

Baby pink

At right is displayed the color baby pink, a light shade of pink.

The first recorded use of baby pink as a color name in English was in 1928.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Baby Pink (color sample #28)

In Western culture, baby pink is used to symbolize baby girls just as baby blue is often used to symbolize baby boys. (See the section Pink in gender in the main article on pink.)

Cherry blossom pink

At right is displayed the color cherry blossom pink.

The first recorded use of cherry blossom pink as a color name in English was in 1867.

Cherry blossom pink is an important color in Japanese culture. In the spring, the Japanese people gather to watch the cherry blossoms bloom during the Hanami festival. This custom has spread to the United States with the institution of the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C.marker.

Carnation pink

Displayed at right is the color carnation pink.

The color as displayed here was formulated by Crayola in 1949.

The first recorded use of carnation as a color name in English was in 1535.

Pastel pink

At right is displayed the color pastel pink.

The source of this color is: ISCC-NBS Dictionary of Color Names (1955)--Color Sample of Pastel Pink (color sample #5)

Brink pink

At right is displayed the color brink pink.

This color was formulated by Crayola in 1998.

Dark pink

At right is displayed the color dark pink, a darker, desaturated shade of pink also known as fandango.

Bright pink

Bright pink is a maximally saturated shade of pink that is another name for the color rose. At right is displayed the color bright pink.

In most continental European countries, the color that in English is called pink is called rosa; therefore, the color that is called rose in English is called bright rosa in most European countries (using whatever adjective in a particular language means bright in that language).

Ultra pink

Displayed at right is the color ultra pink.

This is a Crayola crayon color invented in 1972. In 1990 the name was changed in error to shocking pink; however, properly speaking, the name shocking pink should be reserved for only the original shocking pink invented by Elsa Schiaparelli in 1936 (shown below).

Shocking pink

Shocking pink (also called neon pink) is bold and intense. It takes its name from the shade used on the box of the perfume called Shocking, designed by Leonor Fini for the Surrealist fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli in 1937.This in turn was inspired by the Tête de Belier (Ram's Head), a 17.27ct pink diamond from Cartier owned by heiress Daisy Fellowes, who was one of Schiaparelli's best clients.

Shocking pink kept its name in British English, whereas in North America "This intense magenta was called shocking pink in the 1930s, hot pink in the 1950s, and kinky pink in the 1960s...[it] has appeared in the vanguard of more than one youth revolution...to some it sings, to others it screams". This color is now again called "shocking pink" to distinguish it from the web color hot pink (shown above). Its appearance is more akin to magenta than it is to traditional pink. This color has always been popular among the avant-garde.

NHRA drag racer Shirley Muldowney was famous for driving a shocking pink dragster.
A bougainvillea with shocking pink flowers
On its way into the German language, shocking pink lost the "shocking" and is called only "Pink", while the English color "pink" is referred to as "Rosa". Meanwhile in Portuguese one of its nomenclatures arrived intact becoming "cor-de-rosa choque" ("shocking pink") used more frequently in Brazil. It's also called "çingene pembesi" (Gypsy pink) in Turkish.

References

  1. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 190; Color Sample of Baby Pink: Page 25 Plate 1 Color Sample C8
  2. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 192; Color Sample of Cherry Blossom Pink: Page 31 Plate 4 Color Sample J4
  3. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 192; Color Sample of Carnation Pink: Page 31 Plate 4 Color Sample I4
  4. Picture of Elsa Schiaparelli's Shocking Pink Perfume Container and information about it (go about 2/3 of the way down the web page):
  5. Varley, Helen, editor Color London:1980--Marshall Editions, Ltd. ISBN 0-89535-037-8 Page 139



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