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The names of the days of the week have various sources in various languages; the most widespread are religious and numeric.

In many cases the names have been changed for religious or secular reasons.

Astrological origins

Heptagram

Weekday heptagram


The order of the week days can be derived "geometrically" from an acute heptagram, the {7/3} star polygon (as 24 mod 7 = 3). The luminaries are arranged in the same Ptolemaic/Stoic order around the points of the heptagram. Tracing the unicursal line from one planet to the next gives the order of the weekdays.

According to some sources, the weekday heptagram is considerably old:
It was with the adoption and widespread use of the seven-day week throughout the Hellenistic world of mixed cultures that this heptagram was created.


First Hour of the Day

Between the 1st and 3rd centuries the Roman Empire gradually replaced the eight day Roman nundinal cycle with the seven-day week. The astrological order of the days was explained by Vettius Valens and Dio Cassius (and Chaucer gave the same explanation in his Treatise on the Astrolabe). According to these authors, it was a principle of astrology that the heavenly bodies presided, in succession, over the hours of the day. The Ptolemaic system asserts that the order of the heavenly bodies, from the farthest to the closest to the Earth, is: Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Sun, Venus, Mercury, Moon. (This order was first established by the Greek Stoics.)

In astrological theory, not only the days of the week, but the hours of the day are dominated by the seven luminaries. If the first hour of a day is dominated by Saturn (), then the second hour is dominated by Jupiter (), the third by Mars (), and so onwith the Sun (), Venus (), Mercury (), and the moon (), so that the sequence of planets repeats every seven hours. Therefore, the twenty-fifth hour, which is the first hour of the following day, is dominated by the Sun; the forty-ninth hour, which is the first hour of the next day, by the Moon. Thus, if a day is labelled by the planet which dominates its first hour, then Saturn's day is followed by the Sun's day, which is followed by the Moon's day, and so forth, as shown below.

According to Vettius Valens, the first hour of the day began at sunset, which follows Greek and Babylonian convention. He also states that the light and dark halves of the day were presided over by the heavenly bodies of the first hour of each half. This is confirmed by a Pompeian graffito which calls 6 February 60 a Sunday, even though by modern reckoning it is a Wednesday. Thus this graffito used the daylight naming convention of Valens whereas the nighttime naming convention of Valens agrees with the modern astrological reckoning, which names the day after the ruler of the first daylight hour.

These two overlapping weeks continued to be used by Alexandrianmarker Christians during the fourth century, but the days in both were simply numbered 1–7. Although names of gods were not used, the week beginning on Wednesday was named in Greek ton theon ([day] of the gods), as used by the late fourth-century editor of the Easter letters of Bishop Athanasius, and in a table of Easter dates for 311–369 that survives in an Ethiopic copy. These overlapping weeks are still used in the Ethiopic computus. Each of the days of the week beginning on Sunday is called a "Day of John" whereas each of the days of the week beginning on Wednesday is called a "tentyon", a simple transcription of the Greek ton theon.

Hour: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Stellar Object → Day
Day 1 Saturn → Saturday
Day 2 Sun → Sunday
Day 3 Moon → Monday
Day 4 Mars → Tuesday
Day 5 Mercury → Wednesday
Day 6 Jupiter → Thursday
Day 7 Venus → Friday


Weekdays named after stellar objects

Middle East, Mediterranean, and western Europe

The seven stellar objects visible to the naked eye, moving in the heavens like living objects, were attributed to gods by the ancients. The planet gods are similar between Sumerians and the Romans.



Celestial Object Moon Mars Mercury Jupiter Venus Saturn Sun
Sumerian Nanna Gugalanna Enki Enlil Inanna Ninurta Utu
Babylonian Sin Nergal Nabû Marduk Ishtar Ninurta Shamash
Greek Selenê Ares Hermes Zeus Aphroditê Kronos Helios
Latin Luna Mars Mercurius Iuppiter Venus Saturnus Sôl
English Luna Mars Mercury Jupiter Venus Saturn Sol


The oldest Greek attestation of a seven day week associated with heavenly luminaries are from Vettius Valens, an astrologer writing ca 170 CE in his Anthologiarum. The order was Sun, Moon, Ares, Hermes, Zeus, Aphrodite, and Cronos; the similarity of Cronos with Chronos was remarked as early as Ptolemy. Valens had studied Egyptian astrology in Alexandriamarker and there had probably also been exposed to Babylonian astrology. From Greece the planetary week names passed to the Romans, and from Latin to other languages of southern and western Europe, and to other languages later influenced by them.

Day:

(see Irregularities)
Monday

Luna
Tuesday

Mars
Wednesday

Mercurius
Thursday

Iuppiter
Friday

Venus
Saturday

Saturnus
Sunday

Sôl
Ancient Greek ημέρα Σελήνης
heméra Selénes
ημέρα Άρεως
heméra Áreos
ημέρα Ερμου
heméra Hermou
ημέρα Διός
heméra Diós
ημέρα Αφροδίτης
heméra Aphrodítes
ημέρα Κρόνου
heméra Krónou
ημέρα Ηλίου
heméra Heliou
Latin dies Lunae dies Martis dies Mercurĭi dies Jovis dies Venĕris dies Saturni dies Solis
Italian lunedì martedì mercoledì giovedì venerdì sabato domenica
Spanish lunes martes miércoles jueves viernes sábado domingo
Romanian luni marţi miercuri joi vineri sâmbătă duminică
French lundi mardi mercredi jeudi vendredi samedi dimanche
Galician luns martes mércores xoves venres sábado domingo
Catalan dilluns dimarts dimecres dijous divendres dissabte diumenge
Interlingua Lunedi Martedi Mercuridi Jovedi Venerdi Sabbato Dominica
Ido Lundio Mardio Merkurdio Jovdio Venerdio Saturdio Sundio
Esperanto lundo mardo merkredo ĵaŭdo vendredo sabato dimanĉo
Uropi Lundia Mardia Mididia Zusdia Wendia Sabadia Soldia
Irish
| An Luan
Dé Luain
An Mháirt
Dé Máirt
An Chéadaoin
Dé Céadaoin
An Déardaoin
Déardaoin
An Aoine
Dé hAoine
An Satharn
Dé Sathairn
An Domhnach
Dé Domhnaigh
Scots Gaelic Di-Luain Di-Màirt Di-Ciadain Di-Ardaoin Di-Haoine Di-Sàthairne Di-Dòmhnaich
Welsh Dydd Llun Dydd Mawrth Dydd Mercher Dydd Iau Dydd Gwener Dydd Sadwrn Dydd Sul
Cornish Dy Lun Dy Meurth Dy Mergher Dy Yow Dy Gwener Dy Sadorn Dy Sul
Breton Di'lun Di'meurzh Di'merc’her Di'riaou Di'gwener Di'sadorn Di'sul
Manx Jelune Jemayrt Jecrean Jerdrein Jeheiney Jesarn Jedoonee
Albanian E hënë E martë E mërkurë E enjte E premte E shtunë E diel
Tagalog Lunes Martes Miyerkules Huwebes Biyernes Sabado Linggo


Northern Europe

The Germanic peoples adapted the system introduced by the Romans but glossed their indigenous gods over the Roman deities (with the exception of Saturday) in a process known as Interpretatio germanica:

  • Monday: Old English Mōnandæg (pronounced [mon.nan.dæg] or [mon.nan.dæj'), meaning "Moon's Day". This is likely based on a translation of the Latin name Dies Lunae (cf. Romance language versions of the name, e.g., French Lundi, Spanish, Lunes, Romanian Luni, Italian Lunedì). In North Germanic mythology, the moon is personified as a god; Máni.
  • Tuesday: Old English Tiwesdæg (pronounced [ti.wes.dæg] or [ti.wes.dæj], meaning "Tiw's day." Tiw (Norse Tyr) was a one-armed god associated with battle and pledges in Norse mythology and also attested prominently in wider Germanic paganism. The name of the day is based on Latin Dies Martis, "Day of Mars" (the Roman war god); compare: French Mardi, Spanish Martes, Romanian Marţi and Italian Martedì.
  • Wednesday: Old English Wōdnesdæg (pronounced [woːd.nes.dæg] or [woːd.nes.dæj) meaning the day of the Germanic god Wodan (later known as Óðinn among the North Germanic peoples), and a prominent god of the Anglo-Saxons (and other Germanic peoples) in England until about the seventh century. It is based on Latin Dies Mercurii, "Day of Mercury"; compare: French Mercredi, Spanish Miércoles, Romanian Miercuri and Italian Mercoledì. The connection between Mercury and Odin is more strained than the other syncretic connections. The usual explanation is that both Wodan and Mercury were considered psychopomps, or leaders of souls, in their respective mythologies; both are also associated with poetic and musical inspiration. German Mittwoch and Finnish keskiviikko both mean 'mid-week'.
  • Thursday: Old English Þūnresdæg (pronounced [θuːn.res.dæg] or [θuːn.res.dæj]), meaning the Þunor's day. Þunor is commonly known in Modern English as Thor, the god of thunder in Germanic Heathenism. It is based on the Latin Dies Iovis, "Day of Jupiter"; compare: French Jeudi, Spanish Jueves, Romanian Joi and Italian Giovedì. In the Roman pantheon, Jupiter was the chief god, who seized and maintained his power on the basis of his thunderbolt (Fulmen).
  • Friday: Old English Frigedæg (pronounced [fri.je.dæg] or [fri.je.dæj]), meaning the day of the Anglo-Saxon goddess Fríge, and is attested among the North Germanic peoples as Frigg. It is based on the Latin Dies Veneris, "Day of Venus"; compare: French Vendredi, Spanish Viernes, Romanian Vineri and Italian Venerdì. Venus was the Roman goddess of beauty, love and sex.
  • Saturday: the only day of the week to retain its Roman origin in English, named after the Roman god Saturn associated with the Titan Cronus, father of Zeus and many Olympians. Its original Anglo-Saxon rendering was Sæturnesdæg (pronounced [sæ.tur.nes.dæg] or [sæ.tur.nes.dæj]). In Latin it was Dies Saturni, "Day of Saturn"; compare: French Samedi. The Spanish and Portuguese Sábado, the Romanian Sâmbătă, and the Italian Sabato come from Sabbata Dies (Day of the Sabbath).
  • Sunday: Old English Sunnandæg (pronounced [sun.nan.dæg] or [sun.nan.dæj), meaning "Sun's Day". This is a translation of the Latin phrase Dies Solis. English, like most of the Germanic languages, preserves the original pagan/sun associations of the day. Many other European languages, including all of the Romance languages, have changed its name to the equivalent of "the Lord's day" (based on Ecclesiastical Latin Dies Dominica). Compare: Spanish and Portuguese Domingo, French Dimanche, Romanian Duminică and Italian Domenica. In both West Germanic and North Germanic mythology the sun is personified as a goddess; Sunna/Sól.


Day:

(see Irregularities)
Monday

Mona/Máni
Tuesday

Tiw/Tyr
Wednesday

Woden/Odin
Thursday

Thunor/Thor
Friday

Frige or Freya
Saturday

Saturn
Sunday

Sunna/Sól
Old English Mōnandæg Tiwesdæg Wodnesdæg Þunresdæg Frigesdæg Sæternesdæg Sunnandæg
Old High German Mānetag Ziestag Wodanstag (Wuotanstag) Donerestag Friatag Sambaztag Sunnuntag
German
| Montag
Dienstag Mittwoch Donnerstag Freitag Samstag or Sonnabend Sonntag
Dutch maandag dinsdag woensdag donderdag vrijdag zaterdag zondag
Old Norse Mánandagr Tysdagr Óðensdagr Þorsdagr Friádagr Laugardagr Sunnundagr
West Frisian Moandei Tiisdei Woansdei Tongersdei Freed Sneon or Saterdei Snein
Norwegian, Bokmål mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag søndag
Norwegian, Nynorsk måndag tysdag onsdag torsdag fredag laurdag sundag
Danish mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag søndag
Swedish måndag tisdag onsdag torsdag fredag lördag söndag
Finnish maanantai tiistai keskiviikko torstai perjantai lauantai sunnuntai

Estonian esmaspäev teisipäev kolmapäev

or kesknädal
neljapäev reede laupäev pühapäev


East Asian Seven Luminaries

The East Asian naming system of week-days closely parallels that of the Latin system and is ordered after the "Seven Luminaries" (七曜), which consists of the Sun, Moon and the five planets visible to the naked eye. The five planets are named after the five elements in traditional East Asian philosophy: Fire (Mars), Water (Mercury), Wood (Jupiter), Metal (Venus), and Earth (Saturn). The earliest known reference in East Asia to the seven-day week in its current order and name is the writings attributed to the Chinesemarker astrologer Fan Ning, who lived in the late 4th century of Jin Dynasty. Later diffusions from the Manichaeans are documented with the writings of the Chinese Buddhist monk Yi Jing and the Ceylonese Buddhist monk Bu Kong of the 8th century under the Tang Dynasty. The Chinese transliteration of the planetary system was soon brought to Japanmarker by the Japanese monk Kobo Daishi; surviving diaries of the Japanese statesman Fujiwara Michinaga show the seven day system in use in Heian Period Japan as early as 1007. In Japan, the seven day system was kept in use (for astrological purposes) until its promotion to a full-fledged (Western-style) calendrical basis during the Meiji era. In China, with the founding of the Republic of Chinamarker in 1911, Monday through Saturday in China are now numbered one through six, with the reference to the Sun remaining for Sunday (星期日).

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Celestial Object Sun (日) Moon (月) Mars (火星) Mercury (水星) Jupiter (木星) Venus (金星) Saturn (土星)
Old Chinese 日曜日 Riyaori
| 月曜日  Yueyaori
火曜日 Huoyaori 水曜日 Shuiyaori 木曜日 Muyaori 金曜日 Jinyaori 土曜日 Tuyaori
Japanese 日曜日 Nichiyōbi 月曜日 Getsuyōbi 火曜日 Kayōbi 水曜日 Suiyōbi 木曜日 Mokuyōbi 金曜日 Kin'yōbi 土曜日 Doyōbi
Korean (Hangul) 일요일 Iryoil 월요일 Woryoil 화요일 Hwayoil 수요일 Suyoil 목요일 Mogyoil 금요일 Geumyoil 토요일 Toyoil
Tibetan gza' nyi ma gza' zla ba gza' mig dmar gza' lhag pa gza' phur bu gza' pa sangs gza' spen pa


Numbered weekdays influenced by Abrahamic religions

Weekdays numbered from Sunday

For the majority of the Abrahamic religions the first day of the week is Sunday. Biblical Sabbath (originally corresponding to Saturday), when God rested from six-day Creation, made the day following Sabbath the first day of the week (corresponding to Sunday). Seventh-day Sabbaths were sanctified for celebration and rest. After the week was adopted in early Christian Europe, Sunday remained the first day of the week, but also gradually displaced Saturday as the day of celebration and rest, being considered the Lord's Day.

Saint Martin of Dumio (c. 520580), archbishop of Braga, decided it unworthy to call days by pagan gods and decided to use ecclesiastic terminology to designate them. This was the birth of the present Portuguese numbered system. Martin also tried to replace the names of the planets, but was not successful. In the Middle Ages, Galician-Portuguese retained both systems. The Roman gods' names are still used in Galician language.

In the Hebrew and Islamic calendars the days extend from sunset to sunset. Thus, Jewish Shabbat starts at sunset on Friday and extends into Saturday. The first day of the Islamic calendar, yaum al-ahad, starts on Saturday after sunset and extends to sunset on Sunday.

Icelandic is notably divergent, maintaining only the Sun and Moon (sunnudagur and mánudagur respectively), while dispensing with the names of the explicitly heathen gods in favour of a combination of numbered days and days whose names are linked to pious or domestic routine (föstudagur, "Fasting Day" and laugardagur, "Washing Day"). The "washing day" is also used in other North Germanic languages, although the "pagan" names generally are retained.

Day

(see Irregularities)
Sunday
First Day
Monday
Second Day
Tuesday
Third Day
Wednesday
Fourth Day
Thursday
Fifth Day
Friday
Sixth Day
Saturday
Seventh Day
Hebrew יום ראשון
yom rishon
Literal transl.: 1st Day

יום שני
yom sheyni
Literal transl.: 2nd Day

יום שלישי
yom shlishi
Literal transl.: 3rd Day

יום רביעי
yom revi'i
Literal transl.: 4th Day

יום חמישי
yom khamishi
Literal transl.: 5th Day

יום שישי
yom shishi
Literal transl.: 6th Day

יום שבת
yom Shabbat
Literal transl.: day of rest

Ecclesiastical Latin Dominica feria secunda feria tertia feria quarta feria quinta feria sexta sabbatum
Portuguese domingo segunda-feira terça-feira quarta-feira quinta-feira sexta-feira sábado
Greek Κυριακή
Kyriakí
Δευτέρα
Dheftéra
Τρίτη
Tríti
Τετάρτη
Tetárti
Πέμπτη
Pémpti
Παρασκευή
Paraskeví
Σάββατο
Sávato
Georgian კვირა

Kvira
ორშაბათი

Oršabat'i
სამშაბათი

Samšabat'i
ოთხშაბათი

Ot'xšabat'i
ხუთშაბათი

Xut'šabat'i
პარასკევი

Paraskevi
შაბათი
Šabat'i
Armenian Կիրակի

Kiraki
Երկուշաբթի

Yerkushabti
Երեքշաբթի

Yerekshabti
Չորեքշաբթի

Chorekshabti
Հինգշաբթի

Hingshabti
Ուրբաթ

Urbat
Շաբաթ

Shabat
Vietnamese chủ nhật or chúa nhật (ngày) thứ hai (ngày) thứ ba (ngày) thứ tư (ngày) thứ năm (ngày) thứ sáu (ngày) thứ bảy
Icelandic sunnudagur (Sun) mánudagur (Moon) þriðjudagur miðvikudagur fimmtudagur föstudagur laugardagur
Arabic يوم الأحد
yaum al-aḥad
يوم الإثنين
yaum al-ithnayn
يوم الثُّلَاثاء
yaum ath-thulathā’
يوم الأَرْبعاء
yaum al-’arbi‘ā
يوم الخَمِيس
yaum al-khamīs
يوم الجُمْعَة
yaum al-jum‘ah
يوم السَّبْت
yaum as-sabt
Malay Ahad Isnin Selasa Rabu Khamis Jumaat Sabtu
Indonesian Minggu (Portuguese) Senin Selasa Rabu Kamis Jumat Sabtu
Javanese Ngaat / Akad meaning? Senen Slasa Rebo Kemis Jemuwah Setu
Minangkabau Minggu / Akek Sinayan Salaso Rabu Kamih Jumek Sabtu
Persian یکشنبه

yekshanbeh
دوشنبه

doshanbeh
سه شنبه

seshanbeh
چهارشنبه

chaharshanbeh
پنجشنبه

panjshanbeh
آدینه Adineh or

جمه Jomeh
شنبه

shanbeh

(Night & Day) shabAneh rooz
Kazakh жексенбi
zheksenbe
дүйсенбi
Düysenbi
сейсенбi
Seysenbi
сәрсенбі
Särsenbi
бейсенбі
Beysenbi
жұма
Juma
сенбі
Senbi

(Night & Day) shabAneh rooz
Turkish pazar pazartesi salı çarşamba perşembe cuma cumartesi
Old Turkic birinç kün ikinç kün üçünç kün törtinç kün beşinç kün altınç kün yetinç kün


Weekdays numbered from Monday

The ISO prescribes Monday as the first day of the week with ISO-8601 for software date formats.

Monday nowadays is considered to be the first day of the week for business and social calendars in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, most of Europe, parts of Asia, some USA calendars, as well as several other countries. ) On most U.S. and Japanese calendars however, Sunday is the first day of the week.

The Slavic, Baltic and Uralic languages (except Finnish) adopted numbering but took Monday rather than Sunday as the "first day". Nevertheless, they refer to Wednesday as the "middle", which implies numbering from Sunday.

Chinese Sunday means "week day"(星期日 or 星期天). Monday is named literally "week one", Tuesday is "week two", and so on. When China adopted the Western calendar Sunday was at the beginning of the calendar week but today Monday is preferred.

A second way to refer to weekdays is using the word zhou (周), meaning "cycle." Therefore Sunday is referred to as zhoumo (周末), meaning "cycle's end" and Monday through Saturday is termed accordingly zhouyi (周一) "first of cycle," zhouer (周二) "second of cycle," and etc.

Another Chinese numbering system, found in spoken Mandarin and in southern dialects/languages (i.e. Cantonese and Min), refers to Sunday as the "day of worship" (礼拜日 or 礼拜天) and numbers the other days "first [day after] worship" (Monday) through to "sixth [day after] worship" (Saturday). The Chinese word used for "worship" is associated with Christian and Muslim worship.

Day

(see Irregularities)
Monday
First Day
Tuesday
Second Day
Wednesday
Third Day
Thursday
Fourth Day
Friday
Fifth Day
Saturday
Sixth Day
Sunday
Seventh Day
ISO 8601 # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Russian понедельник

ponedel'nik
вторник

vtornik
среда

sreda
четверг

chetverg
пятница

pyatnitsa
суббота

subbota
воскресенье

voskresen'ye
Belarusian Панядзелак

panyadzelyak
Аўторак

autorak
Серада

serada
Чацьвер

chats'ver
Пятніца

pyatnitsa
Субота

subbota
Нядзеля

nyadzelya
Ukrainian понедiлок

ponedilok
вiвторок

vivtorok
середа

sereda
четвер

chetver
п'ятниця

p'yatnitsya
субота

subota
недiля

nedilya
Polish Poniedziałek Wtorek Środa Czwartek Piątek Sobota Niedziela
Slovak pondelok utorok streda štvrtok piatok sobota nedeľa
Czech pondělí or pondělek úterý or úterek středa čtvrtek pátek sobota neděle
Slovene Ponedeljek Torek Sreda Četrtek Petek Sobota Nedelja
Croatian Ponedjeljak Utorak Srijeda Četvrtak Petak Subota Nedjelja
Serbian Понедељак

Ponedeljak
Уторак

Utorak
Среда

Sreda
Четвртак

Četvrtak
Петак

Petak
Субота

Subota
Недеља

Nedelja
Macedonian понеделник вторник среда четврток петок сабота недела
Bulgarian понеделник

ponedelnik
вторник

vtornik
сряда

sryada
четвъртък

chetvartak
петък

petak
събота

sabota
неделя

nedelya
Hungarian hétfő kedd szerda Slavic csütörtök Slavic péntek Slavic szombat vasárnap
Estonian esmaspäev teisipäev kolmapäev

or kesknädal
neljapäev reede laupäev pühapäev
Lithuanian Pirmadienis Antradienis Trečiadienis Ketvirtadienis Penktadienis Šeštadienis Sekmadienis
Latvian Pirmdiena Otrdiena Trešdiena Ceturtdiena Piektdiena Sestdiena Svētdiena
Chinese Mandarin 星期一 星期二 星期三 星期四 星期五 星期六 星期日 or 星期天
Chinese Hanyu Pinyin xīngqī yī xīngqī èr xīngqī sān xīngqī sì xīngqī wǔ xīngqī liù 'xīngqī rì or xīngqí tiān
Mongolian

(numerical)
нэг дэх өдөр

neg deh odor
хоёр дахь өдөр

hoyor dahi odor
гурав дахь өдөр

gurav dahi odor
дөрөв дэх өдөр

dorov deh odor
тав дахь өдөр

tav dahi odor
хагас сайн өдөр

hagas sain odor
бүтэн сайн өдөр

buten sain odor


Weekdays numbered from Saturday

Originally, when the Romans named the week-days after pagan Gods, Saturnus (Saturday) was the first day of the Week (first planet in the order explained above).

The creation week according to Genesis was six-days, on the sixth and final day of creation God created man. Therefore Saturday when "God, having completed the heavens and the earth, rests from his work, and blesses and sanctifies the seventh day" Is seen by some as the first day for man and therefore beginning of the week.

Day

(see Irregularities)

Saturday
First Day
Sunday
Second Day
Monday
Third Day
Tuesday
Fourth Day
Wednesday
Fifth Day
Thursday
Sixth Day
Friday
Seventh Day
Swahili jumamosi jumapili jumatatu jumanne jumatano alhamisi ijumaa


In Hinduism

Sanskrit attestations of the navagraha "nine astrological forces", seven of which are used for day names, date to the Yavanajataka "Sayings of the Greeks", a 150 CE translation of a 120 CE Greek Alexandrian text.

Day Sunday

Surya (the Sun)
Monday

Soma (the Moon)
Tuesday

Mangala (Mars)
Wednesday

Budha (Mercury)
Thursday

Guru (Jupiter)
Friday

Shukra (Venus)
Saturday

Shani (Saturn)
Sanskrit भानुवासरम्

Bhaanu
इन्दुवासरम्

Indu
भौमवासरम्

Bhauma
सौम्यवासरम्

Saumya
गुरूवासरम

Guru
भ्रगुवासरम्

Bhrgu
स्थिरवासरम्

Sthira
Hindi रविवार

Ravivār
सोमवार

Somavār
मंगलवार

Mangalavār
बुधवार

Budhavār
गुरूवार

Guruvār
शुक्रवार

Shukravār
शनिवार

Shanivār
Marathi रविवार

Ravivār
सोमवार

Somavār
मंगळवार

MangaLavār
बुधवार

Budhavār
गुरूवार

Guruvār
शुक्रवार

Shukravār
शनिवार

Shanivār
Bengali রবিবার

Robibar
সোমবার

Shombar
মঙ্গলবার

Monggolbar
বুধবার

Budhbar
বৃহস্পতিবার

Brihôshpotibar
শুক্রবার

Shukrobar
শনিবার

Shonibar
Urdu Itwaar meaning? Peer or Shambah Mangal Budh Jumaa-raat Raat = Eve Jumaah Saneechar or Haftah
Burmese တနင်္ဂနွေ

Taninganway

(Tananganve)
တနင်္လာ

Taninla

(Tanangla)
အင်္ဂါ

Inga

(Angga)
ဗုဒ္ဓဟူး

Boddhahu (night=new day) ရာဟူး Rahu
ကြာသာပတေး

Kyathabaday

(Krasapate)
သောကြာ

Thaukkya

(Saukra)
စနေ

Sanay

(Cane)
Gujarati રવિવાર

Ravivār
સોમવાર

Somvār
મંગળવાર

Mangaḷvār
બુધવાર

Budhvār
ગુરૂવાર

Guruvār
શુક્રવાર

Shukravār
શનિવાર

Shanivār
Maldivian އާދީއްތަ

Aadheettha
ހޯމަ

Homa
އަންގާރަ

Angaara
ބުދަ

Budha
ބުރާސްފަތި

Buraasfathi
ހުކުރު

Hukuru
ހޮނިހިރު

Honihiru
Tamil ஞாயிற்று கிழமை

Nyāyitru day
திங்கட் கிழமை

Thingat day
செவ்வாய்க் கிழமை

Sevvāi day
புதன்க் கிழமை

Budhan day
வியாழக் கிழமை

Vyāzha day
வெள்ளிக் கிழமை

Velli day
சனிக் கிழமை

Shani day
Telugu Aadi day Soma day Mangala day Budha day Bestha/Guru/Lakshmi day Shukra day Shani day
Malayalam Nyāyar Thingal Chouvva Budhan Vyāzha Velli Sheni
Kannada ಭಾನುವಾರ

Bhanu Vaara
ಸೋಮವಾರ

Soma Vaara
ಮಂಗಳವಾರ

Mangala Vaara
ಬುಧವಾರ

Budha Vaara
ಗುರುವಾರ

Guru Vaara
ಶುಕ್ರವಾರ

Shukra Vaara
ಶನಿವಾರ

Shani Vaara
Thai วันอาทิตย์

Wan āthit
วันจันทร์

Wan chan
วันอังคาร

Wan angkhān
วันพุธ

Wan phut
วันพฤหัสบดี

Wan phruehatsabodi
วันศุกร์

Wan suk
วันเสาร์

Wan sao
Mongolian адъяа
adiya
сумъяа
sumiya
ангараг
angarag
буд
bud
бархабадь
barhasbadi
сугар
sugar
санчир
sanchir
Javanese Raditya Soma Anggara Buda Respati Sukra Tumpek
Balinese Redite Coma Anggara Buda Wraspati Sukra Saniscara


Mix of different conventions

Mix of Latin and Slavic conventions

In Žejane dialect of Istro-Romanian, lur (Monday) and virer (Friday) follow the Latin convention, while utorek (Tuesday), sredu (Wednesday), and četrtok (Thursday) follow the Slavic convention.

Day:

(see Irregularities)

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Istro-Romanian, Žejane dialect lur utorek sredu četrtok virer simbota dumireca


Irregularities

Monday

 After No Work
After Bazaar
Head of Week
Master (as in Pir, because Muhammad was born on a Monday )


Tuesday

 Thing (Assembly)
 Second day of the week (cf. Hungarian kettő "two")


Wednesday

 Mid-week or Middle
The First Fast (Christianity)


Thursday

 The day between two fasts (An Dé idir dhá aoin, contracted to An Déardaoin) (Christianity)
Five (Arabic)


Friday

 The Fast (Celtic) or Fasting Day (Icelandic) (Christianity)


Good Friday or Preparation (Christianity)

 Day of Faith (Islam)
Gathering/Assembly/Meeting (Islam)
Half Weekend


Saturday

 Shabbat or seventh-day Sabbath (Judeo–Christian)
Wash or Bath day
Sun-eve (Eve of Sunday)
After the Gathering (Islam)
End of the Week (Arabic Sabt = End) (Islam)
Week


Sunday

(Sabbath in Christianity)
Holy Day (Christianity)
Resurrection (Christianity)
Bazaar Day
Market Day
No Work
Full Weekend


External links

See also



Books



Websites



References

  1. Symbol 29:16
  2. Swahili days, months, dates
  3. http://www.istrianet.org/istria/linguistics/istrorumeno/news/05_1000language-month.htm






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