The Full Wiki

More info on Wilson Eyre

Wilson Eyre: Map

Advertisements
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



Wilson Eyre, Jr. (October 30, 1858 - Oct. 23, 1944) was an influential Americanmarker architect and writer who practiced in the Philadelphiamarker area. The son of Americans living abroad, he was born in Florence, Italymarker, and educated in Europe, Newport, Rhode Island, and Canada. He studied architecture briefly at the Massachusetts Institute of Technologymarker, joined the Philadelphia offices of James Peacock Sims in 1877, and took over the firm on Sims’s death in 1882. In 1911, he entered into partnership with John Gilbert McIlvaine, and opened a second office in New York City. The firm of Eyre & McIlvaine continued until 1939.

Architect and author

Eyre is known for his deliberately informal and welcoming country houses, and for being an innovator in the Shingle Style. For his most important early houses, "Anglecotmarker" (1883) and "Farwood" (1884-85), he used a similar plan: a line of asymmetrical public rooms stretching along a single axis, extending even outside to a piazza. Like many Shingle Style architects, he employed the open "living hall" as an organizing element in his plans. All of the main first floor rooms connected to the living hall, often through large openings. In addition, he used staircases to extend the space of the hall to the second floor. According to architectural-historian Vincent Scully: "This sense of extended horizontal plane and intensified "positive" scale evident in Eyre's work becomes later a basic component in the work of [Frank Lloyd] Wright..." Eyre collaborated with artists such as Alexander Stirling Calder and Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Following his early success, Eyre became a leader in the international country life movement, traveling to England and corresponding with British and German architects. He was one of the first U.S. architects to be featured in the Arts & Crafts magazine International Studio, and he was published by Hermann Muthesius, the chronicler of the so-called "English" house of the turn of the century. Among foreign designers, Eyre was arguably the best known domestic architect in the U.S. prior to Frank Lloyd Wright's rise to prominence. His post-1890 country houses, such as "Allgates" (1910, expanded by Eyre & McIlvaine 1917) are among the most accomplished American essays in the restrained stucco cottage idiom popularized by C.F. Voysey and Ernest Newton in England. He was one of the founders and editors of House & Garden magazine. He designed many distinctive gardens with his residences, and wrote extensively of the need for interaction between rooms and outdoor spaces.

Eyre was also renowned for his distinctive artistic drawings, often in watercolor. His extant drawings are now housed in the Architectural Archives of the University of Pennsylvania. He was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architectsmarker in 1893. In 1917, he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Institute of Architectsmarker. He taught at the University of Pennsylvaniamarker, and was one of the founders of the T Square Club of Philadelphia in 1883.

Selected works

Philadelphia area

Residences

  • "Anglecotmarker" (Charles Adams Potter house), 401 E. Evergreen Ave., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, PA (1883). Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
  • "Farwood" (Richard L. Ashurst house), Overbrook, PA (1884-85, demolished).
  • "Wisteria" (Charles A. Newhall house), 444 W. Chestnut Hill Ave., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, PA (1884-85).
  • Dr. Henry Genet Taylor house and office, 305 Cooper St., Camden, NJ (1884-86).
  • Harriet D. Schaeffer house, 433 W. Stafford St., Philadelphia, PA (1888)
  • Clarence Bloomfield Moore house, 1321 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA (1890).
  • Henry Cochran house, 3511 Baring St., Philadelphia, PA (1891).
  • Neil and Mauran houses, 22nd & Delancey Sts., Philadelphia, PA (1891).
  • Dr. Joseph Leidy house and office, 1319 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA (1894).
  • Mrs. Evan Randolph house, 218 W. Chestnut Hill Ave., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, PA (1906).
  • Alterations to Wilson Eyre house, 1003-05 Spruce St., Philadelphia, PA (1909-1910). Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.
  • "Allgates" (Horatio Gates Lloyd mansion), Coopertown Rd., Haverford, PA (1910, expanded by Eyre & McIlvaine 1917).
  • Additions to "Bel Orme" (Thomas Mott house), Matson Ford & County Line Rds., Radnor, PA (Eyre & McIlvaine) (1917).

Other buildings



Buildings elsewhere

Gallery

File:TaylorFacade.jpg|Dr. Henry Genet Taylor house and office, 305 Cooper St., Camden, NJ (1884-86).File:TaylorStair.jpg|Interior of Taylor house (1884-86).File:SchaefferHouse.jpg|Harriet D. Schaeffer house, 433 W. Stafford St., Philadelphia, PA (1888).File:Charles Lang Freer House.jpg|Charles Lang Freer Housemarker, 71 E. Ferry St., Detroit, MI (1890).File:DetroitClub.jpg|Detroit Clubmarker, 712 Cass Ave., Detroit. MI (1891).File:ClarenceBMooreHouse.jpg|Clarence Bloomfield Moore House, 1321 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA (1890). Eyre's Leidy House is next door (right).File:1319locustst front.jpg|Dr. Joseph Leidy, Jr. House & Office, 1319 Locust St., Philadelphia, PA (1894).File:Mask&Wig.jpg|Mask & Wig Clubhousemarker, 310 S. Quince St., Philadelphia, PA (1894, altered by Eyre 1901).Image:University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.JPG|University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropologymarker, 3260 South St., Philadelphia, PA (1895-99), Wilson Eyre, Frank Miles Day, and Cope & Stewardson, architects.File:BelOrme.jpg|"Bel Orme" (Thomas Mott house), Radnor, PA (altered by Eyre & McIlvaine 1917).File:Swann Fountain-27527.jpg|Swann Memorial Fountainmarker, Logan Circle, Philadelphia, PA (1924), Eyre & McIlvaine, architects; Alexander Stirling Calder, sculptor.

References

  1. Wilson Eyre Biography at Philadelphia Architects and Buildings
  2. Vincent J. Scully, Jr. The Shingle Style and the Stick Style (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1955, revised 1971), p. 124, figs. 97, 98, 100 & 101.
  3. Anglecot at Bryn Mawr College
  4. "Anglecot" plan & photos at University of Pennsylvania
  5. "Farwood" plan & photos at University of Pennsylvania
  6. Newhall house at Chestnut Hill Historical Society
  7. Taylor House at Historic American Buildings Survey
  8. [ Schaeffer House] at Historic American Buildings Survey
  9. Clarence Moore house (left) at Bryn Mawr College
  10. Cochran house at University of Pennsylvania
  11. Neil and Mauran houses at University of Pennsylvania
  12. Joseph Leidy house (right) at Bryn Mawr College
  13. Randolph house at Chestnut Hill Historical Society
  14. Wilson Eyre house at the Historic American Buildings Survey
  15. "Bel Orme" at the Historic American Buildings Survey
  16. Mask & Wig
  17. Corn Exchange Bank at Bryn Mawr College
  18. McPherson Square Library at Library Company of Philadelphia
  19. Parrish House
  20. "Meadowcroft" at Philadelphia Architects and Buildings
  21. Sands mansion plan & photos


External links




Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message