The Full Wiki

Advertisements

More info on Wind power in the European Union

Wind power in the European Union: Map

Advertisements
  
  
  

Wikipedia article:

Map showing all locations mentioned on Wikipedia article:



In 2008, according to EWEA wind association, there were 5,000 wind turbines, with a total name plate capacity of 64.93 GW in the European Union, worth 142 TWh of electricity and requiring and investement of 11 billion euroIn 2008, the European Union produced 4.2% of its electricity with wind energy. . As of 2009, the leading countries are Germany (25 GW) and Spain (16.7 GW).

EEA (European Environment Agency)s Europe's onshore and offshore wind energy potential report, confirms wind energy could power Europe many times over. The report highlights wind power’s potential in 2020 as three times greater than Europe’s expected electricity demand, rising to a factor of seven by 2030.

In 2008, 8.48 GW (8.1 onshore and 0.37 GW offshore) of wind energy capacity was installed in the European Union compared to 27 GW in the world.The market for European wind power capacity grew in 2006, according to statistics from the European Wind Energy Association. 7,588 MW of wind power capacity, worth some €9 billion, was installed in the European Union (EU) in 2006, an increase of 23% compared to 2005. For the seventh consecutive year, wind power is second only to gas-fired capacity (approximately 8,500 MW in 2006) in terms of new electricity generating installations. Germanymarker and Spainmarker continue to attract the majority of investments. In 2006 these two countries represented 50% of the EU wind power market.

The cumulative wind power capacity operating in the EU increased by 19% and now exceeds 48,000 MW in 2006. In an average wind year this will produce approximately 100 TW·h of electricity, equal to 3.3% of total EU electricity consumption.

Currently more than 25,000 wind farms are operating throughout Europe, and capacity is expected to double by 2015. According to the European Wind Energy Association, the industry will be worth $109 billion by 2020.

Research from a wide variety of sources in various countries shows that support for wind power is consistently between 70 and 80 per cent amongst the general public.

Wind power installed in Europe by end of 2007


European countries

Wind power in the European Union‎
Capacity (MW) Electricity (GWh)
# Country 2006 2007 2008 Total 2007 2008
1 2,233 1,667 1,656 23,903 39,500 41,923
2 1,587 3,522 1,609 16,754 27,050 34,207
3 11 3 51 3,180 7,173 7,300
4 634 427 852 3,241 5,274 6,591
5 417 603 1,010 3,736 4,034 5,957
6 694 434 712 3,180 4,040 5,700
7 810 888 950 3,404 4,052 5,654
8 356 210 478 2,225 3,437 4,200
9 250 59 197 1,002 1,875 2,298
10 173 125 114 985 1,847 2,159
11 146 20 13 995 2,019 2,040
12 62 217 233 1,021 1,430 2,021
13 69 123 196 472 472 723
14 26 93 97 384 520 653
15 4 24 33 143 191 260
16 43 4 62 127 110 230
17 22 34 88 158 61 157
18 22 63 34 150 125 140
19 0 26 20 78 72 121
20 49 7 3 54 66 104
21 0 0 0 35 64 71
22 0 0 0 27 51 51
23 1 5 2 10 8 18
24 0 0 0 3 6 10
25 0 0 0 0 0 0
26 0 0 0 0 0 0
27 0 0 0 0 0 0
27 (MW) 7,609 8,554 8,484 64,949 103,477 122,687
28 97 287 433
29 47 8 95 428
30 3 1 90
31 0 11
Europe (MW) 7,708 8,662 8,877 65,947


The table shows the installed wind power capacity and produced electricity in the European union countries and some selected European countries at the end of years 2006-2008.

The other table shows the installed wind power capacity of the top 10 countries at the end of 2006 and 2007. The actual total for Europe in 2006 was 48,545 MW. Thus, the top ten group made up 94%, even though there are now 27 countries in the EU.

Wind power today, in an average wind year, generates the equivalent of over 20% of Denmark’s electricity use and 25–30% of that in three German Länder, and on windy days with light loads, over 100% of the load in certain regions, particularly in West Denmark, North Germany, and northern Spain.

Wind power in the European Union‎
Country 2006 (MW) 2007 (MW) Target 2010 (MW)
Germany 20,622 22,247 30,000*
Spain 11,615 15,145 20,000 a)
Denmark 3,136 3,125 5,000 c)
Italy 2,123 2,726 9,500 b)
UK 1,963 2,389 6,000 c)
France 1,567 2,454 13,500
Portugal 1,716 2,150 5,100
Netherlands 1,560 1,746 2,500 c)
Austria 965 982 965 d)
Greece 746 871 3372 d)
Romania 3 10 1200 c)
Lithuania . - 52 200 c)
Total 46,013 51,900 93,311
* = prediction, a) 2010-11 b) 2012 c) 2009-10 d) already 2006




Wind power
% of electricity and per person Pure Power, Wind Energy Scenarios up to 2030 EWEA April 2008 s. 20-21
2007 2008
Country % electricity W/person W/person
21.3 579 581
11.8 367 370
7.0 270 291
9.3 203 270
8.4 193 228
Average 3.8 116 131
3.4 107 136
3.3 120 119
1.3 88 111
1.1 71 90
3.7 78 88
1.7 47 63
1.8 45 58
1.8 40 54
1.2 40 53
0.7 28 36
0.3 21 27
0.5 10 21
1.1 15 19
0.4 11 14
0.9 12 12
0.4 7 12
0.4 6 12
0.0 1 1
0.0 0 1


Germany



Germanymarker is the world's second largest user of wind power, behind only the United Statesmarker, with an installed capacity of 20,621 MW in 2006 and 25,000 MW in 2009, ahead of Spain which had an installed capacity of 11,615 MW in 2006 and 16.7 at the end of 2008. More than 18,000 wind turbines are located in the German federal area and the country has plans to build more wind turbines.

Wind power in Germany produces about seven percent of the country's total power and it is said that no other nation has more technological know-how in this area. Wind power in Germany provides over 64,000 people with jobs and German wind energy systems are also exported.

However, the economics of wind power in Germany are under close scrutiny and there are other issues which deserve consideration. These include the effect of wind turbines on the landscape, the effect on the bird population, and the effect on the tourist industry.


Spain

Spain is the second leading producer of wind power in Europe (after Germanymarker) and is in competition with the United Statesmarker for second place globally.

“Spain holds these positions as a result of the establishment of a stable regulatory framework, better understanding of the resource, and improved technology that have afforded considerable cost reduction in terms of initial investment, maintenance, and exploitation”.



Denmark



Wind power in Denmark provides some 20 per cent of Danish domestic electricity
and Denmarkmarker is a leading wind power nation in the world. The Danes were pioneers in developing commercial wind power during the 1970s and today almost half of the wind turbines around the world are produced by Danish manufacturers such as Vestas.


The Danish wind turbine industry is the world’s largest and 90% of the wind turbines manufactured in Denmark are sold to international markets. In 2003, the Danish manufacturers had a total world market share of approximately 38%, generating a combined turnover of almost 3 billion Euro and maintaining over 20,000 people employed in the industry, from wind turbine factories to maintenance and research.

The development of wind power in Denmark has been characterized by a close collaboration between publicly financed research and industry in key areas such as research and development, certification, testing, and the preparation of standards.

United Kingdom

In February 2007 the installed capacity of wind power in the United Kingdom passed the 2 GW milestone, equivalent to two coal fired power stations, with the opening of the Braes O'Doune wind farm, near Stirlingmarker. The UK is the seventh country in the world to reach this capacity.

Romania

As of 2008, wind power in Romania has an installed capacity of 76 MW, up from the 7 MW installed capacity in 2007.In 2009, Romania will add to its installed wind capacity another 1,200 MW from two wind farms complete in the summer of 2009.Romania has a high wind power potential of around 14,000 MW and a power generating capacity of 23 TWh.The main regions of great potential of wind are Dobrogea and Moldavia.

Republic of Ireland

Ireland is one of the best locations in Europe for wind power as it is situated on the Western edge of Europe and is exposed to high winds from the Atlantic Oceanmarker and Irish Seamarker. Wind power capacity factors tend to be higher in Ireland than anywhere else. By the end of 2008 the installed capacity of wind power in Irelandmarker was 1,244.7 MW.

Most wind farms in Ireland are located in coastal regions and especially in the West of Ireland. However the Irish Sea is getting some attention and the first offshore wind farm in Ireland is located a few kilometers north of Arklowmarker and 10 km out to sea and is known as the Arklow Bank Wind Park. This is set to expand in the future. Other proposals are an offshore wind farm on the Kish Bankmarker which is about 15 kilometers offshore from Dublinmarker, the capital city. With another planned wind farm at Clogherhead (north of Droghedamarker, south of Dundalkmarker), to be called the Oriel Wind Farm.


Lithuania

The Lithuanian government is planning on mimicing Baltic neighbor Denmarkmarker, which generates 20 percent of its energy with wind turbines. Lithuanian government have plans to build 200 megawatts of renewable energy by 2010 in wind turbines .

See also



References

  1. http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/press/campaigns/Count_on_Wind_Energy_Briefing.pdf
  2. http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/Annual_Report_2008.pdf
  3. http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/press/campaigns/Count_on_Wind_Energy_Briefing.pdf
  4. http://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/europes-onshore-and-offshore-wind-energy-potential
  5. http://www.eolicenergynews.org/?p=1329#more-1329
  6. http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/press/campaigns/Count_on_Wind_Energy_Briefing.pdf
  7. http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/reports/Offshore_Report_2009.pdf
  8. European Market for Wind Turbines Grows 23% in 2006
  9. Europe: No. 1 in Sustainable Energy
  10. Fact sheet 4: Tourism
  11. EWEA 2006 Annual report, Powering change European Wind Energy Association p. 5
  12. Wind power installed in Europe by end of 2007 (cumulative) EWEA 5.2.2008
  13. Wind energy barometer 2008 EurObserv’ER Systèmes solaires Le journal des énergies renouvelables n° 183, 2/2008
  14. Wind energy barometer 2008 EurObserv’ER Systèmes solaires Le journal des énergies renouvelables n° 189, 4/2009
  15. Wind farms in Portugal, March 2007
  16. Lovins, Amory B. (2005). Nuclear power: economics and climate-protection potential, see footnote 28.
  17. EWEA 2006 Annual report, Powering change European Wind Energy Association
  18. Wind power installed in Europe by end of 2007 (cumulative) EWEA 5.2.2008
  19. ReportWindkraft, IG Metall 4/2005
  20. ren21 2006, 2005: Record year for investments in renewable energy REN21: Renewables Global Status Report 2006 Update, REN21 Paris and Washington, DC, 18.7.2006
  21. Wind energy barometer 2007 - EurObserv’ER Systèmes solaires Le journal des énergies renouvelables n° 177, s. 71-90, 2/2007, Italy note: In order to reach 25 % RE of electricity (2012) “National Wind Power Association”
  22. Prioritising Wind Energy Research Prioritising Wind Energy Research, Strategic Research Agenda of the Wind Energy Sector European Wind Energy Association EWEA 5/2005, (2003 ennuste)
  23. Photovoltaic power systems programme Annual report 2006
  24. Bridging Lithuania’s energy gap. Adam Mullett. December 3, 2008
  25. Wind energy barometer 2008 EurObserv’ER Systèmes solaires Le journal des énergies renouvelables n° 189, 4/2009, p.54, 72
  26. http://www.erneuerbare-energien.de/inhalt/45021/4590/
  27. Global wind energy markets continue to boom – 2006 another record year
  28. Wind energy in Germany -- overview
  29. Germany's wind farms challenged
  30. The world's leader in Wind Power
  31. Wind energy: a visionary match
  32. UK wind power portfolio reaches new milestone
  33. World Wind Energy Report 2008
  34. Bridging Lithuania’s energy gap. Adam Mullett. December 3, 2008


External links




Embed code:
Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message