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The Yellow-bellied Glider (Petaurus australis), also known as the Fluffy Glider, is a marsupial about the size of a rabbit. It typically has a grey-brown back and is off-white to orange underneath, with large pointed ears and a long tail.

The Yellow-bellied Glider is the largest species of Petaurus, the wrist-winged gliders, a group of arboreal marsupials, and can glide up to 150 metres.

It is similar in appearance to the Mahogany Glider, although slightly larger in size. It is also similar in appearance to the Greater Glider, a species that is more closely related to the Lemur-like Ringtail Possum than to the other members of the Petaurus genus.

The Yellow-bellied Glider is gregarious and spends the day in a leaf-lined tree hole, which is usually shared with other members of the same species.

Although the Yellow-bellied Glider has a narrow range down eastern Australia, reaching from northern Queenslandmarker to Victoriamarker, its status is classified as uncommon to rare, and it is vulnerable in the topics.

The Yellow-belled Glider's diet consists of nectar, honeydew, insects, pollen and Eucalyptus sap (which is obtained by the Yellow-bellied Glider biting a 'V' shape wedge into the bark to promote the flow of gum and sap).

Breeding occurs in spring in the south, but throughout the year in the north.

There are two subspecies:
  • P. a. australis in the south (which is locally common)
  • P. a. reginae in northern Queensland (which is rare and threatened with logging)


Conservation

The two primary threats to the species are barbed-wire fences and logging, specifically felling of old nest trees. It is currently listed as a species of "Least Concern" because it has a wide distribution, including several protected areas. While it is a rare species, there is a presumed large population which is unlikely to be decreasing at a rate that would threaten the species under the criteria for current categories. gyes

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